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Bulletin Article

7968
 

Umiat field in northern Alaska is a shallow, light-oil accumulation with an estimated original oil in place of more than 1.5 billion bbl and 99 bcf associated gas. The field, discovered in 1946, was never considered viable because it is shallow, in permafrost, and far from any infrastructure. Modern drilling and production techniques now make Umiat a more attractive target if the behavior of a rock, ice, and light oil system at low pressure can be understood and simulated.

The Umiat reservoir consists of shoreface and deltaic sandstones of the Cretaceous Nanushuk Formation deformed by a thrust-related anticline. Depositional environment imparts a strong vertical and horizontal permeability anisotropy to the reservoir that may be further complicated by diagenesis and open natural fractures.

Experimental and theoretical studies indicate that there is a significant reduction in the relative permeability of oil in the presence of ice, with a maximum reduction when connate water is fresh and less reduction when water is saline. A representative Umiat oil sample was reconstituted by comparing the composition of a severely weathered Umiat fluid to a theoretical Umiat fluid composition derived using the Pedersen method. This sample was then used to determine fluid properties at reservoir conditions such as bubble point pressure, viscosity, and density.

These geologic and engineering data were integrated into a simulation model that indicate recoveries of 12%–15% can be achieved over a 50-yr production period using cold gas injection from five well pads with a wagon-wheel configuration of multilateral wells.

7963
 
Organic-carbon–rich shales of the lower Marcellus Formation were deposited at the toe and basinward of a prograding clinothem associated with a Mahantango Formation delta complex centered near Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. Distribution of these organic-carbon–rich shales was influenced by shifts in the delta complex driven by changes in rates of accommodation creation and by a topographically high carbonate bank that formed along the Findlay-Algonquin arch during deposition of the Onondaga Formation. Specifically, we interpret the Union Springs member (Shamokin Member of the Marcellus Formation) and the Onondaga Formation as comprising a single third-order depositional sequence. The Onondaga Formation was deposited in the lowstand to transgressive systems tract, and the Union Springs member was deposited in the transgressive, highstand, and falling-stage systems tract. The regional extent of parasequences, systems tracts, and the interpreted depositional sequence suggest that base-level fluctuations were primarily caused by allogenic forcing—eustasy, climate, or regional thermal uplift or subsidence—instead of basement fault reactivation as argued by previous workers. Paleowater depths in the region of Marcellus Formation black mudrock accumulation were at least 330 ft (100 m) as estimated by differences in strata thickness between the northwestern carbonate bank and basinal facies to the southeast. Geochemical analysis indicates anoxic to euxinic bottom-water conditions. These conditions were supported by a deep, stratified basin with a lack of circulation.

Explorer Article

8473
 

Shale formations can confound even the savviest geoscientist when it comes to determining the inner workings of the rock. After expert evaluation, even the most attractive prospecting deal can be a tough sell. And there’s almost always a new piece to each of these puzzles that requires some sophisticated high-tech explaining.

8045
 

Oklahoma! As-yet unlocked SCOOP and STACK plays have plen’y of room for maturation and development.

Explorer Emphasis

8058
 

Induced seismicity has been the bane of hydraulic fracturing’s public image, but research is underway to determine the precise culprit for seemingly unnatural earthquakes.

Explorer Policy Watch

3803
 

Oil and natural gas production continued to grow in the United States in 2013 even as progress on new federal laws and regulations stalled – but local opposition to shale gas and oil development increased.

Explorer Regions and Sections

8075
 

This is a very significant year in Alberta and throughout the Canada Region, as it represents the 100-year anniversary of the Turner Valley gas field.

Search and Discovery Article

8143
 

In recent years, artificial intelligence techniques, and neural networks in particular, have gained popularity in solving complex nonlinear problems. Permeability, porosity and fluid saturation are three fundamental characteristics of reservoir systems that are typically distributed in a spatially non-uniform and non-linear manner. In this context, porosity and permeability prediction from well log data is well-suited to neural networks and other computer-based techniques. The present study aims to estimate formation porosity and permeability from digital well log data using an artificial neural network (ANN) approach. A representative case study from the Alberta Deep Basin is presented. Five well log responses (Gamma Ray Log (GR), Deep Resistivity (RD), Formation Density (DEN), Neutron Porosity (PHIN) and Density Porosity (PHID)) are used as inputs in the ANN to predict porosity and permeability. Core porosity and permeability are used as target data in the ANN to test the prediction. The accuracy of the ANN approach is tested by regression plots of predicted values of porosity and permeability with core porosity and permeability respectively. Excellent matching of core data and predicted values reflects the accuracy of the technique. ANN is a fast and accurate method for the prediction of reservoir properties and could be applied in reservoir modeling and characterization.

Wiki Article

9048
 

From AAPG Wiki: Offshore rigs are similar to land rigs but with several additional features to adapt them to the marine environment. Those features include: Heliport, Living quarters, Cranes and Riser.

9046
 

From AAPG Wiki

Forum

Oklahoma City Oklahoma United States 29 May, 2014 29 May, 2014 3810
 
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, United States
29 May 2014
Join us for an intensive one-day forum which will focus on optimizing the exploration and development of the Woodford Shale. We're looking at recent findings in geochemistry and geomechanics to understand how best to drill and complete the reservoir, and also where the productive limits may be.

Short Course

Denver Colorado United States 03 June, 2014 05 June, 2014 1505
 
Denver, Colorado, United States
3-5 June 2014

Here is an introduction to the tools and techniques that geologists and geophysicists use to locate gas and oil, that drillers use to drill the wells and that petroleum engineers use to test and complete the wells and produce the gas and oil. Exercises throughout the course provide practical experience in well log correlation, contouring, interpretation of surface and subsurface, contoured maps, seismic interpretation, well log interpretation, and decline curve analysis.

Workshop

Muscat Oman 28 April, 2014 30 April, 2014 8522
 
Muscat, Oman
28-30 April 2014

This workshop will focus on the technologies and techniques through a comprehensive technical program with presentations and discussions to share experiences, case studies, and opportunities.

Ho Chi Minh Viet Nam 25 May, 2014 28 May, 2014 7913
 
Ho Chi Minh, Viet Nam
25-28 May 2014

The purpose of this workshop is to bring together all stakeholders necessary to consider the potential bottle-necks and pinch point related to optimising a field’s production given a full understanding of the necessary components from the reservoir to the well-head.

Pittsburgh Pennsylvania United States 17 June, 2014 19 June, 2014 3780
 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States
17-19 June 2014

Two of the top unconventional plays just keep getting stronger. Learn why they are successful, and how to optimize exploration and development.

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