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Explorer Historical Highlights

Natural gas was first commercially discovered in the San Juan Basin of New Mexico in 1921, making this year the Basin’s centennial. The first San Juan Basin natural gas strike occurred one mile south of Aztec, N.M., when the Aztec Oil Syndicate completed their No. 1 State. Production was found at a depth of about 1,000 feet. The gas discovered south of Aztec was piped into town and used domestically throughout most of the 1920s. This was the first commercial use of natural gas in New Mexico or the San Juan Basin. Located in northwest New Mexico and southwest Colorado, the San Juan is one of the largest gas basins in the United States, along with the Marcellus in the Appalachian Basin and the greater Hugoton Field of Texas, Oklahoma and Kansas.

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American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Explorer President’s Column

Listening to “A Change Is Gonna Come” as I write prompted me to think about change. For some of us, change is not a comfortable thought because we focus on how change affects our sense of self, or we fixate on the potential loss of comfortable routines and familiar circumstances. For others, change is the stuff of life because it promises something new and exciting. For AAPG, change is inevitable as we prepare to serve future generations of petroleum geologists and geoscientists in closely related fields like environmental geology, geothermal energy and the burgeoning hydrogen industry.

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American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Explorer Emphasis Article

Initially in charge of funding energy research and resource assessments, Houseknecht received a fateful telephone call in 1995 from former USGS Research Geologist Don Gautier, who asked him to participate in a field session in Alaska. Now, 26 years later, David Houseknecht has been awarded the Wallace E. Pratt Memorial Award for the best AAPG Bulletin article in 2019, which outlines a detailed geological framework of the North Slope to explain the geology of recent discoveries and delineate the potential for future discoveries.

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American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Explorer Emphasis Article

Analog traps are an important part of any geoscientist’s tool kit, and there is no better source than understanding how giant fields form and have been found by past and current generations of explorers. My sojourn into learning about these big fields was in the mid-1980s at Amoco in Denver, part of a task force charged with understanding how to better explore for big, subtle, stratigraphic and combination traps. Meeting weekly for lunch for several months, a team of us reviewed Amoco’s proprietary “Red Book” – a collection of summaries of giant fields worldwide, which included maps and rock properties, but, more importantly, the strategy used in finding each field. In addition, we pulled heavily from AAPG giant fields publications compiled from hundreds of AAPG volunteers.

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American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Explorer Article

Unconventional resource development has a remarkable history, combining breakthroughs and advances in both technology and geoscience. The pace of progress might have slowed in recent years, but that history is still being written.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Explorer Article

In North America’s history of building pipelines to transport oil, natural gas and petroleum products, somewhere along the way, the process became political. By pulling the presidential permit on the Keystone XL pipeline, President Joe Biden sent a powerful message: Even if a pipeline benefits citizens and trade relations with important allies, and even if it has met or exceeded design and regulatory requirements and secured community support, its fate can ultimately be determined by a whim.

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American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Explorer Division Column EMD

What motivates you? How do you keep going? I have been thinking about how we have been keeping motivated over the past year while most of us have been coping with working from home, juggling office space and taking care of children, along with job losses, health crises, and few (if any) interactions or in-person networking opportunities. I know that many of you have been experiencing all or some of those situations and, unfortunately, it is not over yet!

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American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Asia Pacific Blog

Join us for this free webinar where Dr. Yong Li will discuss the Co-Occurrence of Multi Unconventional Natural Gases in Upper Paleozoic, Ordos Basin, China.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Explorer Article

If you have ever wondered what Robert Southey, who wrote “Goldilocks,” Lewis Carroll, who wrote “Alice in Wonderland,” and W.H. Adams, widely credited with discovering the Permian Basin, have in common – and you would be forgiven if you haven’t – then this month’s AAPG Global Super Basins Leadership Conference will be the occasion to find out. Because someone from Chevron has been thinking about that very comparison – both from the perspective of how the company is working to use the Permian as a template for future exploration and also because it sums up the state of affairs in 2020 about as well as anything.

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American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Explorer Geophysical Corner

This study is primarily based on a 3-D seismic dataset that covers 1,107 square kilometers of the deepwater Ceará Basin. For this demonstration, the seismic cube was cropped and extends over an area of 765 square kilometers. It covers part of Premier Oil, Cepsa, Chevron and Ecopetrol exploration blocks, as well as ANP’s blocks of permanent offer. Here we present a broad overview of the seismic geomorphology of the study area aiming at delineating the turbidite channels, as the sands are deposited in the channels and can accumulate the hydrocarbons, which can be exploited for the benefits of the petroleum industry, as well as discuss a pitfall associated with the cropping of seismic data.

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American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Short Course
Manama, Bahrain
Thursday, 22 September 2022, 8:30 a.m.–4:30 p.m.

Date: 25 September 2022 Time: 8:30am - 4:30pm Course Instructor: Alberto Ortiz, Net Zero Carbon Solutions Registration Fee: $530 Registration Deadline: 25 August 2022 Short Course registration is included as part of the GTW registration process. The petrophysical characterization of unconventional shale-type reservoirs has been one of the most approached and relevant issues in the oil and gas industry in the last 8 years. This is because after several years, the operating companies comprehended the impact that an appropriate characterization of the reservoir has on their project economics. Another reason for this were the technical obstacles encountered in the measurement of petrophysical properties such as porosity, saturation and permeability due to the complexity of this type of reservoir. Obstacles and limitations not only relate to laboratory measurements but also to electrical logging tools. As a consequence of this, nowadays, petrophysical evaluations in this type of reservoir do not have standardized workflows established and accepted worldwide as is the case for conventional reservoirs. This motivates the professionals involved in the study of this type of rocks to dedicate a lot of effort in the validation of the technologies used, and sometimes it is difficult for them to understand the results, the evaluation of uncertainties and the construction of petrophysical models with results and representative parameters of the subsurface conditions. This course will focus on providing key knowledge for a better characterization of the rock both in the aspects related to the matrix represented by mineralogy and kerogen as well as the fluids present. The approach will be based on the convergence of different technologies that support and give robustness to the results. The contents that will be provided will include laboratory testing techniques and petrophysical evaluation of electrical well logs for unconventional shale-type reservoirs. The contents provided will cover a variety of studies based on the most diverse physical principles that will include the latest advances and techniques used in the industry such as Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, Spectroscopy, Dielectric, Computed axial tomography and SEM images, among others. As a result of this, attendees will have tools that allow a more comprehensive understanding of this type of rocks, a better assessment of the uncertainty of the model used and the necessary steps to improve its precision, accelerating the learning curve. The contents provided will also allow knowing the critical parameters that must be taken into account for the definition of areas to be drilled. Course Topics Reservoir heterogeneity characterization from outcrops to lab data and electrical logging. Most relevant unconventional plays of the world. Main characteristics. The petrophysical model. Components and definitions, construction, uncertainties, strengths and weakness. Lab studies: porosity, saturation, mineralogy, organic geochemistry and permeability. Electrical logging response on unconventional shale plays: triple combo, NMR, NMR T1T2, nuclear spectroscopy, spectral GR, dielectric. The effect of maturity on kerogen. Challenges on water saturation calculation. Data integration. Interpretation workflows and core calibration.

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American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Workshop
Naples, Italy
Wednesday, 22 June Thursday, 23 June 2022, 8:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m.

Modelling carbonate sequences and reservoirs has always been a challenging task. Carbonate rocks are generated and subsequently modified by a large variety of biological, physical and chemical processes that start at the time of deposition and end today. To unravel the geological evolution and history of carbonate sequences is fundamental not only for understanding their hydrocarbons potential but also for their role as potential reservoirs for renewable energy (geothermal) or geological gas storage (CO2 and hydrogen). Several science disciplines are often involved to fully understand the characteristics of carbonate rocks and old approaches and new technologies and tools are nowadays applied in these types of sequences. The objective of this meeting is to allow scientists and engineers working on carbonate rocks in academia and industry to share their most recent experience, work, approaches and use of innovative technologies to increase the understanding of the very complex world of carbonates.

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American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Online Certificate Course
Tuesday, 1 January 2013, 12:00 a.m.–1:00 a.m.

This course introduces the learner to the fundamentals of shale gas, including current theories that explain its origin, and how to determine which reservoirs are commercially viable.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Online e-Symposium
Thursday, 20 August 2009, 12:00 a.m.–12:00 a.m.

This e-symposium covers advances in geothermal energy, integration with petroleum operations, and lessons learned in recent cases.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Online e-Symposium
Thursday, 28 April 2011, 12:00 a.m.–12:00 a.m.

The Niobrara Petroleum System of the U.S. Rocky Mountain Region is a major tight petroleum resource play.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Webinar
Virtual Webinar
Thursday, 4 June 2020, 3:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m.

Salt welds form due to salt thinning by mechanical (e.g., salt-flow) and/or chemical (e.g., salt-dissolution) processes. This webinar explores how we use 3-D seismic reflection, borehole, and biostratigraphic data to constrain the thickness and composition of salt welds, and to test the predictions of analytical models for salt welding.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Online e-Symposium
Thursday, 24 October 2013, 12:00 a.m.–12:00 a.m.

This e-symposium will be introducing signal processing techniques as a means to maximize extracting geomechanical data from petrophysical logs.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Online e-Symposium
Thursday, 26 September 2013, 12:00 a.m.–12:00 a.m.

The presentation will discuss key reservoir information and how to develop a predictive pressure model.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Online e-Symposium
Thursday, 19 March 2015, 2:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

A detailed biostratigraphic analysis and stratigraphic framework of the Paleocene and Eocene Chicontepec Formation in the Tampico-Misantla basin, onshore eastern Mexico, was conducted using 33 wells.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Online e-Symposium
Tuesday, 16 August 2011, 12:00 a.m.–12:00 a.m.

The geochemistry of formation fluids (water and hydrocarbon gases) in the Uinta Basin, Utah, is evaluated at the regional scale based on fluid sampling and compilation of past records.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Online e-Symposium
Tuesday, 2 December 2014, 2:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.

The gas transport in organic-rich shales involves different length-scales, from organic and inorganic pores to macro- and macrofractures. In order to upscale the fluid transport from nanoscale (flow through nanopores) to larger scales (to micro- and macrofractures), multicontinuum methodology is planned to be used.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Online Certificate Course
Tuesday, 1 January 2013, 12:00 a.m.–1:00 a.m.

Unconventional Resources is an online course that enables participants to learn about shale gas, shale oil and coalbed methane.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
VG Abstract

In 1991, Gulf Indonesia and its partners discovered South Sumatra Basin’s first major gas field at Dayung in the Corridor PSC. A key feature of this field is that most of the reserves are held within fractured basement rocks of pre-Tertiary age. 

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American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
VG Abstract

Production from unconventional petroleum reservoirs includes petroleum from shale, coal, tight-sand and oil-sand. These reservoirs contain enormous quantities of oil and natural gas but pose a technology challenge to both geoscientists and engineers to produce economically on a commercial scale. These reservoirs store large volumes and are widely distributed at different stratigraphic levels and basin types, offering long-term potential for energy supply. Most of these reservoirs are low permeability and porosity that need enhancement with hydraulic fracture stimulation to maximize fluid drainage. Production from these reservoirs is increasing with continued advancement in geological characterization techniques and technology for well drilling, logging, and completion with drainage enhancement. Currently, Australia, Argentina, Canada, Egypt, USA, and Venezuela are producing natural gas from low permeability reservoirs: tight-sand, shale, and coal (CBM). Canada, Russia, USA, and Venezuela are producing heavy oil from oilsand. USA is leading the development of techniques for exploring, and technology for exploiting unconventional gas resources, which can help to develop potential gas-bearing shales of Thailand. The main focus is on source-reservoir-seal shale petroleum plays. In these tight rocks petroleum resides in the micro-pores as well as adsorbed on and in the organics. Shale has very low matrix permeability (nano-darcies) and has highly layered formations with differences in vertical and horizontal properties, vertically non-homogeneous and horizontally anisotropic with complicate natural fractures. Understanding the rocks is critical in selecting fluid drainage enhancement mechanisms; rock properties such as where shale is clay or silica rich, clay types and maturation , kerogen type and maturation, permeability, porosity, and saturation. Most of these plays require horizontal development with large numbers of wells that require an understanding of formation structure, setting and reservoir character and its lateral extension. The quality of shale-gas resources depend on thickness of net pay (>100 m), adequate porosity (>2%), high reservoir pressure (ideally overpressure), high thermal maturity (>1.5% Ro), high organic richness (>2% TOC), low in clay (<50%), high in brittle minerals (quartz, carbonates, feldspars), and favourable in-situ stress. During the past decade, unconventional shale and tight-sand gas plays have become an important supply of natural gas in the US, and now in shale oil as well. As a consequence, interest to assess and explore these plays is rapidly spreading worldwide. The high production potential of shale petroleum resources has contributed to a comparably favourable outlook for increased future petroleum supplies globally. Application of 2D and 3D seismic for defining reservoirs and micro seismic for monitoring fracturing, measuring rock properties downhole (borehole imaging) and in laboratory (mineralogy, porosity, permeability), horizontal drilling (downhole GPS), and hydraulic fracture stimulation (cross-linked gel, slick-water, nitrogen or nitrogen foam) is key in improving production from these huge resources with low productivity factors.

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American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)

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