The Latin America and Caribbean Region (LACR) video library includes a collection of recordings from virtual events, including the Tuesday Talks Visiting Geoscientist series, Thursday Thoughts interview sessions with LACR leadership and the 2020 LACR Young Professionals Virtual Conference. Videos are available for viewing on demand.

SW Caribbean Basins Virtual Research Symposium

Southwest Caribbean Basins Virtual Research Symposium: Recent Studies and Advances in Understanding the Geology of Colombia, Panama and Venezuela | Thursday, 23 July – Friday, 24 July 2020, 8:00 a.m.–6:30 p.m. | Virtual Research Symposium via Zoom (Bogota, Colombia time)

Hear Andres Pardo, Antonio Velásquez, and Andrea Ortiz-Karpf debate how geophysics enhance the geological understanding of Caribbean stratigraphy configuration. The panelists talk both in English and Spanish throughout the discussion. The panel discussion took place on 23 July 2020, as a part of the Southwest Caribbean Basins Virtual Research Symposium. Bios: Andres Pardo, Universidad de Caldas Andres earned a BSc in Geology form the Universidad de Caldas, Colombia, and a MSc and PhD both in Geology from the Universite De L'Etat A Liege, Belgium. With 31 years of experience in the academy, he is currently Titular Professor and researcher at the Universidad de Caldas in Manizales, Colombia, where he also administrates the Instituto de Investigaciones en Estratigrafía-IIES (Stratigraphy Research Institute). He previously worked at the ANH and is a member of the ACGGP and Professional Council of Geology, Colombia. Antonio Velásquez, Ecopetrol S.A./p> Antonio graduated from Universidad Nacional de Colombia with a BSc degree in Geology. He also holds a MSc in Geology from the same university and a MSc in Geophysics and Seismology form the Colorado School of Mines. With 15 years of experience in the industry, he currently works at Ecopetrol Brasil as Exploration Assets Manager, where he leads the exploration team responsible for prospect generation and maturation, and is also on charge of project management, economical evaluations, TCR / Alt.TCR roles in partnerships and operations follow-up in offshore assets located in both PreSalt and Ecuatorial Magin basins. Antonio is a member of AAPG, SEG, EAGE and ACGGP. Andrea Ortiz-Karpf, Ecopetrol S.A. Andrea earned a BSc in Geology form the Universidad Nacional de Colombia and a PhD from the University of Leeds. In her 15 years of experience in the industry, Andrea has worked in companies as BP and Equion. Currently, she is Technical Advisor for the Exploration Vice-presidency at Ecopetrol in Bogota, where she supports the exploration VP by prompting technical quality and rigor, and implementing technical standards. Andrea is a member of AAPG, ACGGP and IAS. Jaime Checa, Occidental Petroleum Geophysicist with 30 years of experience in seismic acquisition and processing. Current manager of geophysical projects for OXY in Colombia.
Authors: Germán Prieto (presenter), Daniel Martinez, Universidad Nacional de Colombia; Max Bezada, University of Minnesota Hear Germán Prieto will talk about what seismology can tell us (or maybe not) about the tectonics in the Southern Caribbean. This presentation was part on the Southwest Caribbean Basins Virtual Research Symposium held on July 2020. Bio: Germán Prieto, Universidad Nacional de Colombia Germán graduated from Universidad Nacional de Colombia with a BSc degree in Geology, and holds a PhD in Geophysics and Seismology from the University of California. He currently is an associate professor and researcher at Universidad Nacional de Colombia, and with more than 15 years of experience in academia, Germán has been Faculty in various institutions, as Universidad de Los Andes, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and Universidad Nacional de Colombia. Germán is a member of American Geophysical Union, Sociedad Colombiana de Geología, Seismological Society of America and SEG.
Author: Luis Salazar, SpecTIR LLC; presented by Marco Nieto A survey of the airborne hyperspectral images was performed in the Guarumen Exploratory Area, Sub Basin of Guarico in Venezuela, over 4000 Km2. The survey specifications were 3 meters spatial resolution (GSD) with the ProSpecTIR-VS sensor (VINIR-SWIR), 356 spectral bands and a spectra resolution of 5nm. The aim of this project consisted of determining the possible ones associated with hydrocarbon emanations. The hypothesis was based on the hydrocarbon microleakage model (Dietmar Schumacher 1996). The decision by PDVSA Exploration Management to use hyperspectral images was based on the primary function to detect anomalies in minerals and vegetation that are associated with hydrocarbon migrations on the surface, seeking greater exploratory reliability and obtaining a better understanding of the oil system in the study area. Once with the laboratory results, the hydrocarbon -related hyperspectral anomaly data were integrated with surface geology, geomorphology, analysis of geochemistry, soil and vegetation laboratories to identify the areas with more significant potential for hydrocarbon exploration. This technique has an advantage in planning seismic and geochemical surveys in detail, managing to precisely direct and focus the location of oil systems at a low cost and a low probability of success. This approach helps to minimize financial risk in acquiring 2D and 3D seismic surveys. The conventional or traditional way of conducting hydrocarbon exploration through the use of 2D, 3D and Geochemical seismic survey technology is well known, however, every day the costs of these technologies increase, which is why many state and private oil companies currently resort to state-of-the-art techniques that minimize costs. That is why remote sensing technology has specialized in oil and gas exploration processes on the surface, since it allows planning and detection in these surveys, managing to precisely direct and focus the location of the oil systems. Bio: Luis David Salazar Paredes, SpecTIR LLC Luis is a Systems Engineer. In his 12 years of experience, he has worked at NatQ Consulting (Mexico), ASD Inc (Sales LATAM), and TsiC Ingenieros Consultores CA. He currently works in International Business Development Oil and Gas at SpecTIR LLC in Reno, Nevada, where he is responsible for oil and gas business in Latin America.
Authors: Benjamin Miller (presenter), Paul Mann, University of Houston The Lesser Antilles arc is a largely submarine feature covered by thick, marine sedimentary rocks and locally by 19 active, stratovolcanoes, and small, carbonate platforms formed on bathymetric highs and extinct volcanic highs. Gravity data therefore provide a useful tool for understanding the continuity and relationships of crustal provinces along the 800-km-long, north-south-trending, intra-oceanic arc of early Cretaceous to recent age. There is no question from gravity data that the remnant arc (Aves Ridge) and the active volcanic arc forms two continuous ridges along the length of the arc. Ages from the remnant arc range from 86 to 65 Ma while those from the active arc range from 38 to 0 Ma. Gravity data reveals a prominent bifurcation in the volcanic arc north of Martinique with the active arc to the west ranging in age in this area from 3.5 to 0 Ma and the inactive “Limestone Caribees” ranging in age from 38 to 25 Ma and capped by a carbonate platform of 15 Ma to recent age. Gravity data reveals that the obliquely subducting St. Lucie fracture zone marks the zone of bifurcation of the northern arc near Martinique. To the south, the Tobago-Barbados ridge extends over a distance of 300 km and is underlain at Tobago Island by arc rocks ranging in age from 160 to 140 Ma. The Limestone Caribees ridge in the north and the TBR to the south appear unrelated arc crustal provinces because: 1) the TBR is located 100 km east of the bifurcation point of the northern arc near Martinique; 2) the TBR and Limestone Caribees exhibit strongly contrasting gravity signatures; and 3) the known ages of the two ridges differ with the Limestone Caribees being much younger. Bio: Benjamin Miller, University of Houston Benjamin has double degree in Geology and Geophysics at the University of Houston. He currently is research assistant at Conjugate Basins, Tectonics, and Hydrocarbons (CBTH) Consortium working on the investigation of the structures in the Northeastern Caribbean plate on the Saba Bank by interpreting stratigraphic sequences on vintage seismic data, examining volcanic history and the impact of the regional plate tectonics, and modelling potential fields. His past experience includes the AAPG UH IBA Team, Finance Departments Payroll and Department Specialist, Landslide Research in China using GPS and LiDar, and Entech Sales and Services Intern. Benjamin is a member of SEG Wavelets, AAPG and HGS.
Authors: Antonio Velásquez (presenter), Ricardo Zavala, Enrique Casaña, Mauricio Afanador, Juan Carlos Llinás, Mauricio Pulido, Oscar Moreno, Sandra Montoya, Fabio Malagón, Helga Nino, Andrea Ortíz-Karpf, John Londoño, Pranab Sen, Ecopetrol, S.A. The AVO technology has become a key tool for the exploration efforts in the offshore Caribbean frontier. In recent years, it emerged as an interesting gas-prone basin with a multitude of reservoirs with characteristic elastic properties and seismic responses. This work reveals and describes the type of AVO reservoirs encountered in three geologic provinces of the offshore Caribbean: Guajira Offshore, Magdalena Fan and Sinú Offshore. In general, DHI analysis based on AVO has been a powerful tool to predict hydrocarbon accumulations. However, key geologic processes control the seismic response differently at each structural province. Using elastic data from recent wells, the seismic signatures were modeled, classified and analyzed, and their meaning as possible DHI’s widely discussed. The AVO response of hydrocarbon-filled sands varies in the whole spectrum of the Rutherford and Williams (1989) classification. In general, DHI analysis based on AVO has been a powerful tool to predict gas accumulations. However, the composition of the sediments (e.g., sand and shale proportions), the changes in pressure or stress regime, as well as the burial history and the sedimentation rate, strongly affect the rock properties and the seismic response, making the fluid prediction quite challenging. Furthermore, low gas-saturated reservoirs, tuned amplitudes and poor quality of pre-stack data are the most common sources for pitfalls. In the Sinú Province, Pleistocene gas-saturated turbidities exhibit class III AVO and create classical bright spots relatively easy to identify. However, thinly bedded sands are tricky to characterize if the gross thickness approaches tuning. The Magdalena Fan Province mostly has confined channel-like Pliocene reservoirs, also with class III AVO gas sands, but fizz reservoirs and tuned amplitudes commonly generate high risk of pitfalls. Finally, the Guajira Province that is geologically more diverse, exhibit high impedance reservoirs, aged Miocene and Oligocene. Typically, class I or IIp AVO signatures affected by tuning are not properly imaged and represent the most challenging reservoirs to accurately predict fluids from seismic data. Bio: Antonio Velásquez, Ecopetrol S.A. Antonio graduated from Universidad Nacional de Colombia with a BSc degree in Geology. He also holds a MSc in Geology from the same university and a MSc in Geophysics and Seismology form the Colorado School of Mines. With 15 years of experience in the industry, he currently works at Ecopetrol Brasil as Exploration Assets Manager, where he leads the exploration team responsible for prospect generation and maturation, and is also on charge of project management, economical evaluations, TCR / Alt.TCR roles in partnerships and operations follow-up in offshore assets located in both PreSalt and Ecuatorial Magin basins. Antonio is a member of AAPG, SEG, EAGE and ACGGP.
Authors: Diego León Venegas Gutiérrez (presenter), Juan Carlos Llinás, Ecopetrol S.A. The Fuerte Sur Block is located in the southern Caribbean offshore of Colombia between the Urabá and the Morrosquillo Gulfs. The area of the block has an extension of 278.000 km2, mostly on the current continental slope. A significant percentage of this block is covered by a 3D PSDM seismic cube, which is the main dataset for this project. A handful of wells have been drilled just outside of the study area, including the Uvero-1, Fuerte-1, Morrosquillo-1 and El Bobito-1 drilled on the continental platform in the late 60s and 70s and the Kronos-1, Purple Angel and Gorgon wells drilled recently at the foot of the slope, which resulted in significant gas discoveries that are being currently evaluated. The studied interval corresponds to the syn-kinematic succession accumulated on top of a distinctive angular unconformity of Pleistocene age that separates it from the pre-kinematic succession that forms the Sinú Offshore Deformed Belt. The syn-kynematic section in the Fuerte Sur area displays a series of narrow depocenters located on the back limbs of predominantly west-verging folds that were being filled by sediments as these structures grew. The objective of this study was to identify and map seismic horizons that are continuous throughout the entire area in order to generate a chronostratigraphic framework for the syn-kinematic succession, and then to define seismic facies in the interpreted sequences that would help to understand the depositional environments, and therefore, to predict the distribution of reservoir, source and seal rocks. Five Horizons were interpreted; the lowest one is the angular unconformity, and four additional horizons define the top of the four sequences (TS1 to TS4). In the syn-kinematic sequence of the Sinú Deformed Belt, seismic facies Cbh, Bh, Cbl, Bl and A were identified based on the methodology of Prather (1998), in addition to hemipelagic deposits corresponding to the slope wedge. The sequences TS1 (Lower Pleistocene) and TS2 (Middle Pleistocene) contain the main reservoir intervals (Cbh facies). In TS3 and TS4, there is a predominance of facies Bh and Bl, which are not considered good reservoirs in the area. In the northern part of the block the sequences become shallower and thinner reducing their prospectivity. The intermediate sector of the block, is the most prospective area with seven deep depocenters containing significant sandy facies. To the south, the depocenters are interpreted to be filled mostly with fine sediments. The identified play in the syn-kinematic sequence in the Fuerte Sur block is characterized by stratigraphic traps, where Cbh facies pinch out of near the edges of the “piggy-back” basins of folds developed due to active compressional tectonics at the time of deposition. Main provenance seems to come from the north, where some sequences were not deposited or eroded (TS1 and TS3), and where Cbh facies predominate and onlap in each mini basin. Bio: Diego León Venegas Gutiérrez, Ecopetrol S.A. Diego earned a BSc in Geology from the Universidad Nacional de Colombia. In his 18 years of experience in the petroleum industry, he has worked at DEMINEX Colombia for 2 years as a Geologist, and was a consultant for the Instituto Colombiano del Petróleo (ICP) for three and a half years in a project about seal rocks, working in petrography and mapping. Currently, Diego works as Geologist in Ecopetrol, providing support as interpreter for the geophysics group in acquisition, interpretation, reprocessing and data management. For the last three years he worked in the offshore group, interpreting the 3D seismic of the Sinu Belt, in orther to identify the seismic facies for the syn-kinematic sequences and prospectivity. Previously, he worked in prospetivity for the onshore group in the different basins of Colombia. He is a member of ACGGP.
Authors: Julián Naranjo-Vesga (presenter), Darwin Mateus-Tarazona, Instituto Colombiano del Petróleo, Ecopetrol S.A.; Andrea Ortiz-Karpf, Pedro Galindo, Ecopetrol S.A.; Lesli Wood, Zane Jobe, Lauren Shumaker, Colorado School of Mines; Juan Felipe Paniagua-Arroyave, Universidad EAFIT The distribution of deep-water gravity deposits in the Sinú Fold Belt, offshore Colombia, is the result of the interaction between tectonic deformation and sediment supply. In tectonically deformed areas, anticlinal structures form barriers for sediment transport from the continental shelf to the basin floor, and piggy-back sub-basins act as sediment traps. Three main river systems feed the Sinú offshore basin: The Magdalena, Atrato, and Sinú rivers. The interplay between sediment supply and along-strike variations in structural deformation, results in complicated sediment-flow pathways, determines the geometry of the continental shelf and slope, and controls the distribution and morphometry of deep-water deposits. This study used approximately 7,736 km2 of 3D seismic and 42,500 km2 of high-resolution multibeam bathymetric data, in order to characterize Pliocene-Recent deep-water gravity-driven deposits along the Sinú offshore basin, analyzing spatial variability and its relationship with shelf and slope morphology and sediment input. The study area was divided in three geomorphological zones: 1) The Northern Zone is characterized by a relatively undeformed slope and high sediment supply from the Magdalena River. In this sector large channel-levee systems that stack vertically for more than 350 m prevail. Most channels start as gullies at the transition between the continental shelf and the slope. In this zone, mass-transport complexes (MTCs) also occur; the larger ones are commonly associated with failures at the shelf edge. MTCs fill bathymetric lows and erode bathymetric highs smoothing the seafloor topography and modifying sediment pathways. 2) The Central Zone highly structurally deformed by NE-SW trending anticlines with steep flanks, separated by piggy-back sub-basins that form a rugose slope profile and act as barriers for sediment transport. This zone is mainly associated with low sediment supply from Sinú River. Submarine canyons are the main conduits for basin-ward sediment transport. They start as gullies on the upper slope and merge downslope to form canyons. Erosion along canyons can breach the anticlines, resulting in the interconnection of piggyback sub-basins and enabling sediments to reach the basin floor. Mass-failures from the steep flanks of structures generate block falls and detached MTCs which commonly run out less than 15 km. 3) The Southern Zone has a moderate sediment supply fed by the Atrato River. Mass wasting has modified sea-floor topography; anticline crests have been eroded and piggyback sub-basins filled, burying the thrust belt and smoothing sea-floor topography. Erosional scours carved by mass failures merge basinward to become submarine canyons on the slope and connecting the slope with the distal basin, where up to 80 km long, MTCs accumulate. This study documents and analyses the impact of sediment supply, structural deformation and shelf width, on the sedimentary processes and depositional architecture of deep-water deposits along the Sinú offshore basin. Bio: Julián Naranjo-Vesga, Instituto Colombiano del Petróleo (ICP) – Ecopetrol S.A Julian earned a BSc in Geology from the Universidad Industrial de Santander, Colombia. With 14 years of experience in the industry, he currently works as a Geologist in the Instituto Colombiano del Petróleo (ICP) – Ecopetrol, S.A. at Piedecuesta, Colombia, bringing support to sedimentology and stratigraphy projects.
Authors: Carlos Ortiz (presenter), Daniel Fernández, Jorge Galeano, Aldo Rincón, Camilo Montes, Felipe Lamus, Universidad del Norte Presentation in Spanish. The Magdalena River is the most important fluvial system in the northern Andes; its delta is located in the Colombian Caribbean Basin and represents one of the largest submarine fans in the world. The evolution of the Magdalena River paleo-delta is recorded in the upper Miocene-lower Pliocene units deposited near its current mouth. Previous studies have proposed a late Neogene - Pleistocene migration of multiple paleo-deltaic lobes, and more recently, the paleo-delta dynamics have been tentatively linked to regional paleoclimatic events during early Pliocene times. To identify Spatio-temporal changes in depositional environments associated with the evolution of the Magdalena river paleo-delta, we carried out detailed mapping of the late Neogene units in the area and analyzed facies associations and stacking patterns in three stratigraphic sections, providing a new interpretation of the previous stratigraphic data. We identified progradational deltaic environments interpreted during late Miocene times, with a westward progradational shift in deltaic facies in early Pliocene times. These changes in the Spatio-temporal distribution of the facies suggest a westward migration of the paleo-delta in a progradational phase during early Pliocene, leading to the deposition of calcareous foreshore deposits to the east of the mapping area, and deltaic deposits in marginal marine environments to the west. Eastward thinning and reduction of siliciclastic input previously identified in the lower Pliocene sequence reinforce this hypothesis and could explain the onset of the great influx of siliciclastic sedimentation in the western upper Magdalena submarine fan. Bio: Carlos Ortiz, Universidad del Norte Carlos is a Geologist from the Universidad del Norte, Colombia.
Authors: Damián Cárdenas (presenter), Francisca Oboh-Ikuenobe, Carlos Jaramillo; Missouri University of Science and Technology, Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute Palynology has been widely used to date sedimentary sequences in Colombia over the last four decades, especially in terrestrial environments. While palynostratigraphic schemes in Colombia—which primarily rely on pollen and spores—are reliable in onshore basins, increasing offshore exploration activities in the Caribbean require detailed studies of both terrestrial and marine palynomorphs. Although dinoflagellate cysts (dinocysts) and acritarchs are widely used for biostratigraphic purposes in shallow to marginal marine sequences worldwide, there are few marine palynological studies in the Caribbean. Here, we present new data on dinocysts and acritarchs from a well-calibrated, shallow-marine sequence drilled in the Cocinetas Basin, Alta Guajira. We propose a novel marine palynostratigraphic scheme that comprises a late Chattian–early Aquitanian Minisphaeridium latirictum Interval Zone (~23.9–22.0 Ma), a late Aquitanian Achomosphaera alcicornu Interval Zone (~22.0–20.3 Ma), and a Burdigalian Cribroperidinium tenuitabulatum Interval Zone (~20.3–17.5 Ma). Our results not only demonstrate the potential of marine palynology for oil and gas exploration in the Colombian Caribbean Margin, but also highlight the need to establish a palynological zonation for this region. Bio: Damián Cárdenas Loboguerrero, Missouri University of Science and Technology Damian earned a BSc in Geology from the Universidad Nacional de Colombia and is a PhD Candidate at the Missouri University of Science and Technology, where he develops analysis and interpretation of Neogene palynological data in the Tropical Americas. In his two years of experience in the industry, he previously worked as Geologist-Palynologist at both the Colombian Petroleum Institute and the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute. Damian is a member of AAPG, Geological Society of America, Paleontological Society and Palynological Society
Authors: Rigo Ramírez (presenter), A. Torres, G. Jiménez, S. Carvajalino, Génesis Consultoría en Geología; G. Veloza, D. Sierra, A. Mora, HOCOL S.A Presentation in Spanish. The ANH-Conuco-1 is a stratigraphic well drilled by the ANH in 2013, in the northernmost San Jacinto fold belt. The well reached a total depth of 2475’ and cored Neogene units on its entirety. Based on our sedimentological analyses three lithostratigraphic intervals were defined, recording a shallowing-upwards succession, from shallow marine (shelf) to strand plain and estuarine deposits. From base to top, the lowermost Interval-1, (2245’-2475’, 229’ thickness) is composed of 59% claystones and 41% siltstones with abundant foraminifera. In this interval, two facies and one facies association were defined and interpreted as shelf deposits.The Interval-2 (384’-2245’, 1861’ thickness) is composed of sandstones (42%), mudstones (25%), siltstones (13%), muddy sandstones (8%) and sandy siltstones (6%). In general, the ichnological record exhibits null to moderate bioturbation, with Phycosiphon and Thalassinoides (several sand-filled and bivalves-filled) as the dominant trace fossils. The major sedimentological structures are even and wavy parallel lamination, with sporadic laminae of organic matter and siderite. It also has fossiliferous sandstones (6%) with bivalves and gastropods shells. Fifty facies and fourteen facies associations were determined, and were interpreted as shelf, delta and strand plain deposits. The contact between Intervals 2 and 1 is conformable gradational. Additionally, a fault zone was identified at depth 1884’- 1886’. The uppermost Interval-3 (10’-384’, 374’ thickness) is made up of mudstones (23%), sandstones (21%), siltstones (18%), limestones (16%) and muddy sandstones (7%). The ichnological record exhibits null to slight bioturbation, with Thalassinoides (filled by mollusk fragments) as the dominant trace fossil. It locally exhibits even and wavy parallel lamination. This interval contains 14% glauconitic limestones, 3% glauconitic sandstones and 8% fossiliferous sandstones. Limestones were classified as wackestone/packstone/grainstone composed of mollusk fragments and glauconite (up to 20%). Thirty facies and eleven facies associations were established. The depositional environment was interpreted from base to top as wave-dominated estuary, strand plain and delta deposits. The contact between Intervals 3 and 2 is identified as a disconformity. This study provides a unique view to the Late Neogene to Quaternary evolution of the Magdalena River paleodelta. Bio: Rigo Ramírez, Génesis Consultoría en Geología Rigo earned a BSc in Geology and is a MSc Candidate. With 18 years of experience I the industry, he currently is General Manager at Génesis Consultoría en Geología S.A.S., where he directs and supervises the development of the company's regular activities, and is also responsible for recruiting staff, selecting, orienting, and training employees, and carrying out administrative management tasks. He also leads, participates and supervises the development of sedimentological, petrographic, stratigraphic and structural analysis in drilling cores and geological mapping. He has previous experience at Rio Tinto Mining Exploration.
Author: Carlos Rey (presenter), ANH Colombia Presentation in Spanish. A campaign of geochemical exploration and heat flow was carried out in the Colombia basin by the DIMAR. The campaign included the interpretation of geophysical data for the identification of optimal sampling sites, followed by the acquisition of 45 samples, their processing and geochemical análisis, some on board and others of samples selected to a geochemical laboratory on the ground for the analysis of biomarkers, diamontoids and carbon isotopes. The remaining central material was labeled and delivered for DIMAR for archival purposes. In addition, a heat flow campaign was completed to better understand the geothermal regime of the region and its potential for hydrocarbon formation. The interpretation of the results of the analyses shows negligible amounts of thermogenic compounds (saturated and aromatic hydrocarbons) that increase south and southwest along the abyssal areas. Tentatively, given very low concentrations, biomarkers and diamontoids suggest that a source rock with a kerogen type II and type II/III may be the source of these hydrocarbons whose maturity stage does not exceed the peak of the oil window. Bio: Carlos Rey, ANH Colombia Carlos earned a BSc in Geology from the Universidad Nacional de Colombia, a MSc in Geology and a MSc in Energy Management. With 30 years of experience in the industry, he has worked 14 years in the ANH, where he currently is Knowledge Management Manager (Gerente de Gestión del Conocimiento) of the Technical Vice Presidency of the ANH.
Author: Andres Pardo (presenter), Universidad de Caldas Hear Andres Pardo talk about the geological history of the Caribbean as defined by its sedimentary and micropaleontologic record. This presentation was part on the Southwest Caribbean Basins Virtual Research Symposium held on July 2020. Bio: Andres Pardo, Universidad de Caldas Andres earned a BSc in Geology form the Universidad de Caldas, Colombia, and a MSc and PhD both in Geology from the Universite De L'Etat A Liege, Belgium. With 31 years of experience in the academy, he is currently Titular Professor and researcher at the Universidad de Caldas in Manizales, Colombia, where he also administrates the Instituto de Investigaciones en Estratigrafía-IIES (Stratigraphy Research Institute). He previously worked at the ANH and is a member of the ACGGP and Professional Council of Geology, Colombia.
Author: Carlos José Rodríguez Taborda (presenter), Technical Vice President, ANH Colombia One of the main objectives of the Colombian National Hydrocarbon Agency (ANH) is the acquisition of information in the Caribbean offshore basins. During the last years the ANH has performed several projects in order to improve the knowledge of the unexplored sedimentary basins and the possibility to find important commercial quantities of hydrocarbons. The Colombian Caribbean basins can be actually divided in three: the offshore Sinu (29, 471 km²), in the west part composed mainly of young Tertiary terrigenous rocks derived from the Magdalena river; the Offshore Guajira basin (56,392 km²) to the east which include older Tertiary and probably Cretaceous rocks highly affected by tectonics; the limit of the two basins is the major wrench Santa Marta-Bucaramanga faults system. The deepest part of the basin is called the Colombia Basin (130,369 km²) in deep and ultradeep waters. Multi structural and stratigraphic plays have been recognized in the three basins. No more than 66 wells have been drilled in the basins which are basically unexplored: only one commercial field, Chuchupa-Ballenas in the offshore Guajira with original reserves in the order of 7.0 TCF. The northern part of South America is now considered a new oil province, considering the major latest discoveries in Guyana and Surinam (8.0 billion BO) and the La Perla gas field (17.0 TCF) in offshore Venezuela. Other discoveries in the Colombian basins like Orca-1, Kronos-1 and Purple Angel-1 will be tested soon. The ANH is completing the acquisition of high resolution bathymetry that will cover 100% of the basins; the project will be ready by the end of the year, and the entire bathymetry will be integrated with regional gravimetry in order to recognize paleohighs with probably cretaceous rocks, which might trap thermogenic liquid hydrocarbons; campaigns of piston cores and heat flow are in process in order to help to understand the thermal maturity of the basins. A large multiclient seismic project is also in progress for reprocessing and acquisition of 2D seismic. The ANH will continue with the acquisition of information in order to have the best information to attract investment for competitive bidding processes. A recent Yet to Find study for the three basins has shown possibilities for at least 7.60 BBO and about 30.0 TCFG recoverable. Bio: Carlos José Rodríguez Taborda, Technical Vice President, ANH Colombia Carlos is a geologist from Universidad Nacional de Colombia and earned a MSc from the University of New Orleans. With 40 years of experience in the industry, he currently is Technical Vice President at the National Hydrocarbon Agency of Colombia (ANH), where he is on charge of the improvement of the knowledge and acquisition of information for mature, emergent and frontier basins; of the evaluation of areas to be promoted by the ANH for bidding process, and leads the update of the land map. He previously has held managerial positions at Interoil, Mansarovar and Mohave; business development for Ecopetrol; and senior geophysicist for Lasmo, Exxon and Texaco. Carlos is a member of AAPG and ACGGP.
Hear Jim Pindell, Paul Mann, Augustin Cardona and Camilo Montes debate the genesis and development of the Southern Caribbean Margin and its implications for the current basin configuration. The panel took place on 23 July 2020, as a part of the Southwest Caribbean Basins Virtual Research Symposium. Bios: Paul Mann, University of Houston Paul earned a BSc from the Oberlin College and a PhD from the State University of New York at Albany, both degrees in Geology. He currently is Professor of Geology at the Dept. of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, University of Houston, where he teaches, researches and supervises grad and undergrad students, and service to the EAS Dept. and other groups. He has also operated an oil industry-funded research group since 2005. Paul is a member of AAPG, GSA, AGU, SEG and HGS. James Pindell, Tectonic Analysis Jim earned a BSc from the Colgate University, a MSc from the State University of New York at Albany, and a PhD from the Durham University UK. With 35 years of experience, he is currently the director at Tectonic Analysis Ltd. In Duncton, West Sussex, U.K., where he is on charge of leading research programs. Jim’s professional memberships includes AAPG, GSA, AGU, GSL and HGS. Victor Ramirez, Hydrocarbon and Energy Consultant Victor is a geologist from Universidad Nacional de Colombia and earned a MSc in Geology from the University of Alabama. In his more than 26 years of experience in the industry he worked at Ecopetrol S.A. for 22 years. He is currently independent Hydrocarbon and Energy Consultant. Victor has been actively involved with professional associations and leadership. He is a member of AAPG since 1993, where he was president of AAPG Latin America & Caribbean Region on 2013-2015 term. He is also past president of ACGGP. Agustín Cardona, Universidad Nacional de Colombia-Medellín Camilo Montes, Universidad del Norte
Stephen Leslie, Paul Mann (presenter), University of Houston The structure and stratigraphy of the central area of the Colombian Basin - offshore the northern Caribbean coast of Colombia - is defined using ~8400 line km of depth-converted 2D seismic data assembled from academic and industry sources. Information from offset DSDP and ODP wells integrated into the structural and stratigraphic model of the Colombian Basin to identify the key elements of a petroleum system. These elements are; 1) Upper Cretaceous marine shale source rock;2) mid-to-upper Miocene (16 to 5.3 Ma) basin floor fans associated with the Magdalena Fan turbidite system; 3) structural traps, stratigraphic traps, or subtle three-way structural closures and 4) sealing intervals formed by Miocene hemipelagic marine shale associated with sea level high-stands. An extension of a previously recognized trap-type for the Colombian Margin is identified based on our seismic observations of amplitude anomalies conformant with structures, fluid migration pathways along faults, and bright, laterally continuous, and low-impedance seismic reflectors within the distal Miocene Magdalena fan section. The primary risk for the exploration potential of the area is the presence of a laterally extensive Upper Cretaceous source rock within this depocenter. 1D burial history models and 3D basin modeling indicate that a source rock of this age and at this stratigraphic level would have expelled hydrocarbons during mid-to-late Miocene from the deepest part of the basin and may continue to expel hydrocarbons at the present-day. Paul Mann, University of Houston Paul earned a BSc from the Oberlin College and a PhD from the State University of New York at Albany, both degrees in Geology. He currently is Professor of Geology at the Dept. of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, University of Houston, where he teaches, researches and supervises grad and undergrad students, and service to the EAS Dept. and other groups. He has also operated an oil industry-funded research group since 2005. Paul is a member of AAPG, GSA, AGU, SEG and HGS.
Ana Jazmin Rodriguez Lara (presenter), Mauricio Alberto Bermúdez, Universidad Pedagógica y Tecnológica de Colombia (UPTC) Presentation in Spanish. In the north-central South America lies Caribbean Mountains, which runs along the central and eastern portions of Venezuela's northern coast. This chain consists of two parallel ranges: Cordillera de la Costa and the Serranía del Interior. Both orogens are the result of the collision between the Caribbean and South American plates. In this area there are few thermochronological data that allow us to reconstruct the deformation history of this chain. Our research combines 2-D Structural restoration, thermal-kinematic models, and fission-track ages, to reconstruct the deformation history of the area. Two competing models were made in the 2D MOVE® software, velocity fields were introduced in the FetKin code, to predict ages on the surface of the zone and compare them with the existing thermochronological data. The choice of the best model is made according a misfit function. Subsequently, the thermal histories of our “best” model is compared with individual t-T paths using HeFTy software. Our results are consistent with an extension and/or sedimentation. Rocks were buried until the Eocene when the Caribbean plate collide with South America. We discriminated 4 different tectonic cooling pulses: ~48 to 40 Ma, ~40 to 23 Ma and ~23 to 5 and 5 to 0 Ma. The first one is related with the convergence between the Caribbean and South American plates, causing the emplacement of the Lara Nappes (Stephan et al., 1985), the second is related to the cooling caused by the subduction of the Caribbean plate below the Caribbean deformed belt, the third phase is explained by the subduction of the Caribbean plate under the South American plate, finally the last pulse could be to related with reactivations of different faults in a transpressive context, and the Mérida Andes exhumation. Ana Jazmin Rodriguez Lara, Universidad Pedagógica y Tecnológica de Colombia (UPTC) Ana Jazmin will be graduating with a BSc in Geological Engineering from the Universidad Pedagógica y Tecnológica de Colombia (UPTC), and is a Laureate thesis candidate. Ana is a member of the Colombian Geothermal Association.
Author: Brian Frost, Anadarko Petroleum Corporation (Retired) The Magdalena River feeds a world class deepwater fan with Miocene to Recent clastics greater than 10 kms thick and in water depths ranging from 2500-4000m. Offshore drilling to date has resulted in a giant dry gas field in shallow water and numerous other undeveloped gas discoveries between 600-2300m wd. A definitive source rock for the discoveries has not been defined and there is unresolved speculation whether the gas is a result of the primary biodegradation of recent organic material or the secondary biodegradation and migration from liquid petroleum. Shallow penetration piston coring has recovered some evidence of a liquids based petroleum system in the ultra-deepwater fan but no live oil samples have been recovered. High quality regional 2D and mega 3D seismic surveys over the ultra-deepwater fan show extensive and stacked class 3/2p AVO anomalies throughout the area with structural/stratigraphic conformance connected by faulting to underlying pods up to 2 kms thick of class 4 AVO source rock anomalies. The potential DHI anomalies cover thousands of sq kms and stack 1000-1500m in gross thickness. Such a large accumulations of anomalies suggest a world class source rock is present similar in facies to the Cenomanian to Campanian age Lomo Chomico Fm that outcrops on the Nicoya Peninsula in Costa Rica and measured 85m of type 1/2 kerogen, 15% avg TOC, and HI 324-935. The key geologic uncertainty is whether liquids are present and what is their API. The key economic uncertainty is can industry develop oil fields in waters >3200m deep. Frontier exploration requires making forecasts with only limited data meaning most of the time we get it wrong. It’s not a good path to follow for getting into the C-Suite but it is how we can find the next super basin. Bio Brian Russel Frost, Anadarko Petroleum Corporation (Retired) Brian frost earned a BSc in Geophysical Engineering from Colorado School of Mines in 1978. With a wide experience of 40 years in the industry, he currently is Distinguished Geophysical Advisor as retired from Anadarko Petroleum Corporation, responsible for worldwide new ventures, frontier exploration and finding the next “Mozambique”. His previous experience includes Phillips Petroleum Corp: Rocky Mountains Exploration, Geophysical Processing, GOM, Indonesia, PRC, and Somalia Exploration, Latin America New Ventures. Conoco: Advance Exploration Organization, Deepwater Niger Delta and Trinidad, Texas Shelf and Atlanic Margins New Ventures. British Borneo: Deepwater GOM, Frontier Exploration, Mauritania. Anadarko: International New Ventures, Frontier Exploration, West and East Africa, Colombia, Peru. Brian is a member of HGS, AAPG, Geological Society of London and PESGB.
Chajid Kairuz (presenter), Ruben Arismendy, ANH Consultants; José Osorno, Carlos Rey, ANH Colombia Presentation in Spanish. The Colombian Caribbean offshore is a frontier area of 223,694 km2, which includes two main Colombian offshore fields: Chuchupa and Ballena (producing for over 47 years). The interest in the region has risen in recent years due to several economic and non-economic discoveries. Hence, this paper aims to discuss the Colombian offshore Caribbean's economic potential, supported by the discoveries and their characteristics. This study used more than 18,600km of 2D seismic data (20 seismic surveys) reprocessed by Colombia's National Hydrocarbon Agency (ANH) on the continental shelf of the Colombian Caribbean (offshore basins of Guajira, Sinu, Uraba and southern region of the Colombia Basin). The integration, interpretation, and correlation of these seismic data was done with over 50 wells and potential methods. Moreover, geochemical data allowed the validation of the Petroleum systems. However, the results have conceived that the Colombian Caribbean only has the potential for biogenic gas. Nevertheless, the present study is supported by data showing otherwise: Crude oil samples in the Chimare 2-1, Punta Gallinas-1 and San Bernardo-1X exploratory wells, Condensed oil in the Orca-1, La Perla-1 (Venezuelan well), and Ballena 7 and 8 wells, Evidence of thermogenic hydrocarbons in core piston samples, Analysis of Cretaceous and Tertiary rocks in several wells in the Caribbean with the potential of generating thermogenic hydrocarbons and outcrops in Sinu and La Guajira (onshore sectors). The results show a new set of opportunities due to the variety of plays identified in the Colombian Caribbean, which have the potential to accumulate thermogenic hydrocarbons. Therefore, the Caribbean offshore has the potential to accumulate thermogenic hydrocarbons, which, together with the biogenic gas already discovered (at least 35 TCF), increase the potential for further exploration. Chajid Kairuz, ANH Consultant Chajid earned a BSc in Geology from the Universidad Nacional de Colombia. With more than 30 years of experience in the industry, he currently is ANH Consultant, and Co-Founder and Manager at Neoil Exploration, responsible project development. He has previous work experience at Ecopetrol, Trayectoria Oil & Gas and as a professor. Chajid is a member if ACGGP, AAPG, EAGE and SPE.
Author: Paul Mann (presenter), Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, University of Houston Using a mega-regional dataset that includes over 20,000 km of on- and offshore 2D seismic lines tied to wells, I illustrate three successive stages in the oblique collision of the Great Arc of the Caribbean (GAC) and the basin response along the northern, continental margin of South America. Stage One: Initial arc-continent collision is characterized by thrusting of the south- and southeastward-facing Caribbean arc and forearc terranes onto the northward-subducting Mesozoic passive margin of northern South America. Northward flexure of the South American craton produces a foreland basin between the thrust front and the downward-flexed continental crust that is initially filled by clastic sediments shed both from the colliding arc and South American craton. Stage Two: This late stage of arc-continent collision is characterized by termination of deformation in one segment of the fold-thrust belt as convergent deformation shifts eastward. Strain partitioning also begins to play an important role as oblique convergence continues, accommodating deformation by the formation of parallel, right-lateral, strike-slip fault zones and backthrusting (southward subduction of the Caribbean plate beneath the South Caribbean deformed belt). Stage Three: This final stage of arc-continent collision is characterized by east-west extension of the Caribbean arc as it elongates parallel to its strike forming oblique normal faults that produce deep rift and half-grabens. The three tectonic stages closely control the structural styles and traps, source rock distribution, and stratigraphic traps for the abundant hydrocarbon resources of the on- and offshore areas of Venezuela and Trinidad. Paul Mann, University of Houston Paul earned a BSc from the Oberlin College and a PhD from the State University of New York at Albany, both degrees in Geology. He currently is Professor of Geology at the Dept. of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, University of Houston, where he teaches, researches and supervises grad and undergrad students, and service to the EAS Dept. and other groups. He has also operated an oil industry-funded research group since 2005. Paul is a member of AAPG, GSA, AGU, SEG and HGS.
Authors: Ruben Arismendy (presenter), Chajid Kairuz, ANH Consultants; José Osorno, Carlos Rey, ANH Colombia The convergent boundaries of the Caribbean plate with the surrounding plates are making a complex structural configuration, associated with strike-slip faulting, compressive folding, lithospheric flexure, and collision zones. Additionally, the basement in the Caribbean Offshore is defined by a paleo-topography formed by extensional structures that caused grabens, hemigrabens, and horsts associated with the rifting phase during the Early Jurassic. The reprocessed 2D seismic data in 2015 (ANH), included four offshore basins: Guajira offshore, Sinu offshore, Uraba, and the Southern area of the Colombian basin. This study used 2D seismic , 50 wells, gravimetric and magnetometric methods to identify regional structural features. These methods allow the regional interpretation of depocenters, identify structural paleo-highs in the basement, and major structural features. The primary regional structurès conditioning the structural provinces styles are Santa Marta´s Fault, Oca´s Fault, Cuisa´s Fault, the Caribbean Southern Deformed Belt, and the Hess Escarpment, the Panama Northern Deformed Belt, and Sinu´s Folded Belt. This study aims to understand the structural configuration of the Colombian Caribbean offshore basins and describe its provinces according to each structural style as a tool to evaluate the prospectivity of the area. As a result, the Colombian Caribbean is divide into six regional structural provinces, according to the predominant structural deformation: province I, Colombian Basin; province II, Guajira´s Deformed Belt; province III, Guajira offshore (transitional zone); province IV, Magdalena Delta; province V, Sinu Offshore; Province VI, Gulf of Uraba. Bio: Ruben Arismendy, ANH Consultant Ruben earned a BSc in Geological Engineering from the Universidad Nacional de Colombia, and a MSc in Basin & Petroleum Systems from the Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam. With 15 years of experience in the industry, he currently is ANH Consultant, and Co-Founder and Manager at Neoil Exploration, responsible for both technical and management activities. Ruben is a member of AAPG and ACGGP.
Authors: Andreas Kammer (presenter), Alejandro Piraquive Universidad Nacional de Colombia Near its juncture with the Panamanian arc the South Caribbean Deformed Belt sways from an ENE margin-parallel strike into the NNW trending Northandean structural grain, and merges with the North Panama Deformed Belt. At this southern termination highly deformed Oligocene to Neocene platform sediments constitute the Sinu belt. They display a unique fold style, which consists of annular anticlinal trains outlining relatively sharp margins of broad elliptical synclines, some tens of km long. Near the western suture of this deformed belt these annular fold complexes are elongate and narrow, but track successively more open forms toward the eastern San Jacinto Belt. Annular antiformal rings may cut each other and their interference patterns display a structural younging toward the internal boundary of the fold belt. Mud volcanoes rooted within basal Oligocene muddy successions straddle the synclinal axes of these annular structures and occupy, only occasionally, their anticlinal borders. Based on these field observations, we suggest an inversion of initially broad, dome-like diapiric antiforms (or pillows), outlining the present synformal structures. A succeeding contractional deformation phase implied both a trend-parallel and perpendicular shortening and caused faults to cut through inherited rim synclines in such a way, that the formerly thickened anticlinal pillows partially peeled off and produced the observed interference patterns. In contrast to the W-vergent fold trains of the continental slope further north, a gravitational component should be dismissed for the formation of this subaerial belt. Instead, this overall constrictional fold pattern might have been caused by a crustal flow along the strongly arched oroclinal bend of the southern Sinu belt. Bio: Andreas Kammer, Universidad Nacional de Colombia Andreas earned a BSc from the University of Bern and currently is a Professor and researcher at the Universidad Nacional de Colombia. Previously also worked at the Universidad Industrial de Santander. Andreas is a member of Colombian Geological Society (SCG).
Authors: Weston Charles, Paul Mann (presenter), University of Houston Previous geophysical and seismological studies have shown that oceanic and oceanic plateau crust of the Colombian and Venezuelan basins of the central Caribbean plate are shallowly subducting southeastward and southward along the South Caribbean deformed belt to a depth of 300 km beneath the northern margin of the South American plate. In addition, the oceanic and oceanic plateau crust of the Venezuelan basin is shallowly subducting northward along the Muertos trench beneath Hispaniola and Puerto Rico. Both subduction systems are amagmatic. We have constructed seven regional transects over distances of (800-1200 km) at right angles to the SCDB and Muertos trench using bathymetry, free-air gravity, depth to the top of the basement, and depth to Moho to model the observed and predicted flexural response of the subducting areas of the Colombian and Venezuelan basins. Our main results include: 1) the distance to the modeled peripheral bulge of the Colombian basin occurs ~ 230 km to the northwest of the SCDB and records the deflection of the thickened, Caribbean large igneous province (CLIP) basement; 2) Plate deflection increases eastward in the Venezuelan basin at ~ 600 m then gradually decreases towards the Aves Ridge - the eastern part of the peripheral bulge forms an arch that slopes westward and is a result of varying load magnitudes along the SCDB and Muertos Trench; and 3) elastic thickness decreases from (57-15 km) west to east which reflects thicker (20-26 km) continental-arc-oceanic plateau crust of the western Caribbean while thinner (4-9 km) normal and thinned oceanic crust of the eastern Caribbean shows greater flexural deformation. Bio: Paul Mann, University of Houston Paul earned a BSc from the Oberlin College and a PhD from the State University of New York at Albany, both degrees in Geology. He currently is Professor of Geology at the Dept. of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, University of Houston, where he teaches, researches and supervises grad and undergrad students, and service to the EAS Dept. and other groups. He has also operated an oil industry-funded research group since 2005. Paul is a member of AAPG, GSA, AGU, SEG and HGS.
Authors: Sean Romito (presenter), Paul Mann, University of Houston Thick sedimentary cover (≤16 km), vintage seismic, and disparate crustal terranes have hindered understanding of the basement underlying the Caribbean plate. The plate formed by Early Cretaceous to Miocene amalgamation of four crustal types: The Caribbean Large Igneous Province oceanic plateau; the Chortis continental block; the related Great Arc of the Caribbean and Siuna/Mesquito Composite Oceanic Terranes island arc blocks; and the Colombian and Venezuelan basin oceanic crust. We characterize each terrane through interpretation of surface geology, 62 000-line-km of 2D seismic reflection data, 366 seismic refraction stations, 47 wells, 74 basement samples, 2D forward modelling, magnetic and gravity anomaly grids, and integration of previous studies. Basins overlying island arc crust are small, fault-bounded and deep, while on continental crust, they are broader and shallower. Strongly flexed oceanic and oceanic plateau crust along amagmatic subduction zones on the southern and northeastern edges of the Caribbean plate produce the largest and deepest sediment filled basins. Areas of proven hydrocarbon source rocks and mapped seeps are associated with continental and island arc terranes in the western Caribbean plate, while organically-rich, but immature, Late Cretaceous source rocks occur across the more elevated areas of the central and eastern Caribbean plate interior. Bio: Sean Romito, University of Houston Sean earned a BSc in Geology from the University of Texas at Dallas, and currently is a PhD candidate and research assistant at the University of Houston, where he develops large-scale tectonic research within the Caribbean plate and the Brazilian passive margin. He has experience as intern on prospect generation within onshore US basins; field work as a wellsite geologist in the Permian; and intern on geologic risk within the Texas panhandle. Sean is a member of AAPG and HGS.
Authors: Andrés Rodríguez-Corcho (presenter), Sara Morón, Romain Beucher, Rebecca Farrington, Louis Moresi, Camilo Montes, The University of Melbourne Unraveling the geodynamic mechanisms behind basin formation in the Caribbean margin of Colombia (CMC) is key for understanding the petroleum systems in the region. The genesis of these Oligocene to present basins remains controversial as none of the proposed mechanisms of fore-arc extension, back-arc extension and block-rotation can fully explain the formation of the basins in the CMC. In this project, I use numerical visco-plastic mechanical models to test the hypothesis that the transference of the intra-oceanic arc to the overriding plate causes extension in the continental margin. This modelling will provide potential mechanisms for explaining the formation of basins in Northern Colombia and the Caribbean margin, some of which are the biggest hydrocarbon-bearing basins in the world. Bio Andrés Rodríguez-Corcho, The University of Melbourne Andrés earned BSc in Geoscience from the Universidad de los Andes, Colombia, and currently is a PhD student at the University of Melbourne, Australia, where he develops original and innovative research in geodynamics. He is a member of ACGGP.
Author: Agustin Cardona (presenter), Universidad Nacional de Colombia Recent advances on the understanding of the Late Cretaceous to Eocene geological record of the Western Colombian Andes have been used to test different paleogeographic and tectonic scenarios of northwestern South America. This talk will try to present a review of this record and evaluate its continuation into the Caribbean region as a way to test the calendars and style of the Caribbean-South American plate tectonic interactions.
Tuesday Talks

Visiting Geoscientist presentations via Zoom

A Bacia de Santos é um excelente exemplo de quanto petróleo é mantido em locais remotos, apenas esperando ser encontrado por exploradores ousados com a vontade e os recursos necessários para encontrá-los. Junte-se a Flávio Feijó para uma apresentação da história e do potencial para futuras descobertas na Bacia de Santos
The Santos Basin is an excellent example of how much oil is kept in remote sites, just waiting to be found by bold explorationists with the will and resources needed to find them. Join Flávio Feijó to for a presentation of the history and potential for future discoveries in the Santos Basin
Visiting Geoscientist Susan Morrice shares her personal experience and insight in this talk about opportunities for geoscientists. “Geoscientists have advantages ... They are Time Travellers and have open minds. Bringing this creativity and innovation to your company or starting your own! Challenging times bring silver linings!”
Both climate change and the most recent coronavirus pandemic have generated multiple impacts on society. Though on the surface the crises appear to be unrelated, they have more similarities than differences. The common elements shared by Covid-19 and climate change promote the development of comprehensive solutions that mitigate both crises simultaneously. This talk examines how actions and strategies developed for the energy transition can help to address the multiple challenges that the world faces today.
Sequence stratigraphy is a method for stratigraphic interpretation, pioneered by Vail and colleagues in the mid 70’s, which explains the complex geometries that sediments create as they fill accommodation in response to changes in rates of sedimentation, subsidence, uplift and eustasy. This method was developed based on observations and concepts developed as early as in the 1800’s. Based on this strong scientific foundation, pioneer work from Caster, Sloss, Wheeler, Campbell, and Asquith established the basis for the methodology. These researchers established a new way to correlate stratigraphic units, demonstrating the time-transgressive nature of lithostratigraphic formations.
La Formación Smackover del Jurásico Superior (Oxfordiano) es una de las productoras de petróleo y gas más prolíficas de la llanura costera del noreste del Golfo de México, depositada en una rampa de carbonato proximal. Este estudio es una caracterización integral del ambiente de depositación de la Formación Smackover basada en datos sísmicos 3D y de pozos en los campos Vocation y Appleton situados en las subcuencas de Conecuh y Manila, en el suroeste de Alabama.
The Upper Jurassic (Oxfordian) Smackover Formation is one of the most prolific oil and gas producers in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico coastal plain, where it deposited in a proximal carbonate ramp. This study is a comprehensive characterization of the depositional environment of the Smackover based on 3D seismic and well data from wells in the Vocation and Appleton oil fields located in the Conecuh and Manila Sub-basins in southwest Alabama.

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