HomeResources Videos Virtual Events & Webinars

Virtual Event Videos and Webinars

An ever-growing collection of webinars and virtual event recordings from AAPG Headquarters and AAPG Regions. These videos are available for viewing on demand.

Recent Webinar Videos

Go deeper into the June Explorer with this lively and informative video presentation, this month featuring: A presidential conversation: AAPG President Rick Fritz and SPE President Tom Blasingame, for the first time in a public setting, discuss the past, active and future dynamics that are inspiring both groups to jointly consider a new path forward. And back in the field … Tom Blasingame puts on his “day job” hat to provide a comprehensive answer to a crucial question: “Where does unconventional resource development go from here?” A “giant” story is getting bigger: John Dolson’s love affair with studying and understanding giant fields of the world began decades ago – but it’s still going strong. Thanks to technological advances, new chapters are being added to the story. And thanks to a new AAPG memoir, the impact could be huge. Also, AAPG Editor Bob Merrill discusses some exciting new geoscience that’s about to become available and easily accessible to all, and Rick Fritz takes a look back on an unforgettable – and unprecedented – year for geoscientists around the world. All that, and more, in the newest Explorer Live!
William Dickson (presenter), Dickson International Geosciences; Mark Odegard, GrizGeo; Craig Schiefelbein, Geochemical Solutions international (GSI); David Rajmon, Geosophix; and Seva Egorov, GeoExpera
Eduardo Faria (presenter), Márcia Karam, Felipe Nascimento, Daniel Canellas, Alexandre Souza, Ronaldo Baldi, Enauta
Miguel Nuñez (presenter), Lidiane Garcia, Erick Moreno, Karoline Conti, Kesley Melo, Leandro Lubiana and Jhonny Marquez, IMETAME Energia
Bruno Valle (presenter), Andrés V. Rodriguez, Augusto Silva-Telles, Marcos Pimentel Mendes, Jorge Lorenzon, 3R Petroleum Oleo e Gas S.A.
Rodolfo Saboia, General Director, National Agency of Petroleum, Natural Gas and Biofuels (ANP)

Recent HQ Webinars

Go deeper into the June Explorer with this lively and informative video presentation, this month featuring: A presidential conversation: AAPG President Rick Fritz and SPE President Tom Blasingame, for the first time in a public setting, discuss the past, active and future dynamics that are inspiring both groups to jointly consider a new path forward. And back in the field … Tom Blasingame puts on his “day job” hat to provide a comprehensive answer to a crucial question: “Where does unconventional resource development go from here?” A “giant” story is getting bigger: John Dolson’s love affair with studying and understanding giant fields of the world began decades ago – but it’s still going strong. Thanks to technological advances, new chapters are being added to the story. And thanks to a new AAPG memoir, the impact could be huge. Also, AAPG Editor Bob Merrill discusses some exciting new geoscience that’s about to become available and easily accessible to all, and Rick Fritz takes a look back on an unforgettable – and unprecedented – year for geoscientists around the world. All that, and more, in the newest Explorer Live!
Go deeper into the May Explorer with this lively and informative video presentation, this month featuring: What happens next? Global energy expert Jim Krane sits down with Susan Nash to discuss the current global energy transition, including the impacts and dynamics of geopolitics for today's geoscientists. Breaking News: Karl Bloor and Jensen Angelloz talk about the challenges and exciting results of the just-completed AAPG/AAPG Foundation Imperial Barrel Award competition. (And the winner is …) Challenge accepted: One year ago, AAPG Elected Editor Bob Merrill said that challenging phases often allow for new ideas and innovative approaches. And then came the pandemic, begging the question: How are we doing? Plus, AAPG President Rick Fritz also talks about AAPG’s experiences and progress throughout the past difficult year, and discusses a potentially important development for AAPG’s future.
Go deeper into the April Explorer with this lively and informative video presentation, this month featuring: Fantastic updates: Tim Shin talks to salt tectonic expert Mark Rowan about how industry’s understanding of salt diapirs is improving – and what that means for tomorrow’s exploration potential. Principal investigator Joseph Moore tells Sarah Barnes about the historic, granite-piercing advances involving geothermal research and development at Utah’s FORGE project – and the resulting new global potential. Community service: Lisa Chisholm, co-chair of AAPG’s new Kuala Lumpur Special Interest Group, tells why she helped start a diverse group devoted to geoscience, networking and community – and the determination to keep it going through a pandemic. Plus AAPG president Rick Fritz shares some important updates involving ACE 2021 plus other big changes for AAPG, and editor Bob Merrill talks about an exciting new chapter in the life of DEG’s journal, Environmental Geosciences – a development designed to shine a brighter spotlight on both DEG and AAPG’s global impact. All that, and more, in this month’s Explorer Live!
The March edition of the Explorer Live! is available for streaming. Go deeper into the March Explorer with the lively and informative video podcast featuring: Jeff Aldrich and John Seidel talking about the elusive and elastic history of “sweet spots.” Jorge Calvache, Ecopetrol’s vice president of exploration, explaining long-term strategies for Colombia’s offshore potential. Linda Sternbach and Julia Lemaster taking a look at how AAPG Sections are adapting and progressing despite the challenges of a COVID world. Plus AAPG president Rick Fritz talks about the future of AAPG’s governance structure, and elected editor Bob Merrill announces some exciting new plans for the AAPG Bulletin. (Hint: Expanded access for all.) All that and more – don’t miss this month’s Explorer Live! podcast.

Recent Asia Pacific Videos

Presented by Dr Basim Faraj, Faraj Consultants Pty Ltd; Australia The Base of Fish Scales Formation (BFSF) is basin-wide and marks the Albian/Cenomanian unconformity (Lower/Upper Cretaceous) boundary at the foreland Western Canada Sedimentary Basin (WCSB). The formation contains abundant fish remains within finely laminated, generally non-bioturbated, very fine sandstone, siltstone, tuff and organic rich mudstones. Regional log mapping of the formation as well as geochemical studies, facies and new core analyses integration allowed the elucidation of the main controls on BFSF productivity. The interplay between volcanic ash fall from Western Cordillera’s super volcanic eruptions, fish kill, authigenic dolomite & hydroxylapatite precipitation, the preservation of organic carbon and the sedimentation of sand/silt layers through storm action during major regression resulted in the preservation of this unique play. EOG Resources Canada and others have completed hundreds of vertical wells in the BFSF as either a stand-alone production zone or co-mingled with other producing zones. Production profiles shows a classic unconventional pattern.
Presented by Gary Greene, Moss Landing Marine Labs, San Jose State University and President, Circum-Pacific Council The Queen Charlotte transform (QC) fault system is a major structural feature that extends from near the northern end of Vancouver Island, Canada to the Fairweather Range of Alaska, where it connects to the Fairweather (FW) Fault system. The QC-FW transform marks the margin between the North America and Padific plates. Until recently the QC fault system, exclusively located in the oceanic realm, was poorly mapped but through the efforts of the USGS, Geological Survey of Canada, U. Alaska, and NOAA, the entire ca 900 km length of the fault and its immediate surrounding seafloor have been surveyed using multibeam echosounder and geophysical instruments. These data present a straight 'knife edged' fault that appears to accomodate the majority of the relative plate motion along the priary strand of the system. However, extensive deformation associated with volcanism and fluid seeps are present throughout most of the length of the system. Elongated conjugate ridges, volcanic cones, and mud volcanoes are well imaged in the bathymetry and in seismic-reflection profiles. Multiple fluid sources including thermogenic formed fluids from hydrocarbon basins are speculated. Seafloor structures and geomorphic feature formed on the seafloor from volcanism and fluid flow provide valuable habitats for various organisms that live at depth in the region.
Presented by Amanda Barlow, Independent Wellsite Geologist Amanda will be giving a run down on the progression of her career from working in mineral drilling roles to working as a wellsite geologist in offshore oil and gas drilling operations. Being a female in a male-dominated industry can present obstacles but Amanda will cover this, as well as such topics as: Deciding what field of geology to study at university What role options there are for graduate geologists and how to choose what's right for you Taking a career break to start a family Resuming your career when the time is right Making the decision to cross industries from minerals to oil and gas What a wellsite geologist actually does Navigating the ever-increasing shift from full-time employment to contractor employment Evaluating your suitability to field based work compared with office based work Deciding if you should stay in the industry or look elsewhere for work during a downturn in the O&G industry Ideas for surviving a downturn in the industry Becoming a published author and how to share your knowledge and experience with the world through writing and publishing your own books
Patawarta Diapir, approximately 2-6km2 located in the Central Flinders Ranges, South Australia, has been interpreted as a single allochthonous salt sheet containing Tonian-aged igneous and layered evaporite sedimentary intrasalt inclusions derived from the Callanna Group. In this webinar, Rachelle Kernen describes the diapir as five primarily silty limestone inclusions (0.5-2km2), re-interpreted as Ediacaran-aged Wonoka Formation and Patsy Hill member of the Bonney Sandstone (Wilpena Group). Webinar presented Thursday 3 December 2020 at 11:00 SGT (GMT+8) Singapore time

Recent Europe Videos

This presentation and demonstration will focus on a machine learning workflow in the upstream Oil and Gas domain to predict formation tops by applying artificial intelligence and machine learning techniques to learn the well logs signatures. This deep learning model provides high quality predictions to aid the geologists in picking lithology markers consistently and in an accelerated fashion thus boosting their operational efficiency. The self-learning model, which is a unique differentiator of dataVediK and encompasses the detection of outliers and data quality issues and their subsequent validation and suggested corrections to improve the quality of data in an automated fashion during the model training process. The demo will then showcase a real-time drilling solution built using this ML model, whereby the formation tops are predicted, and the structural model is updated automatically as the GR log is acquired.
This talk examines what we are missing the use of in terms of waste heat in both the petroleum industry and long abandoned coal industry of the UK, how we might use that heat and what the collateral benefits of heat use would be in terms of sustainability and the circular economy.
Join us as Jane Whaley, geologist and Editor-in-Chief of GEO ExPro Magazine, interviews Gretchen Gillis, President-Elect of AAPG, about her experiences as a woman in the oil-and-gas industry.
Ray Leonard will be talking to us about 'Climate Change, Covid-19 and the Effect on Energy’s Future'. Fossil fuels have led to a profound increase in world living standards but resulting emissions of CO2 and methane into the atmosphere are a primary factor in climate change. The impact of the Covid-19 pandemic of 2020 has resulted in a significant decrease in world economic activity, which in turn has led to a major, if temporary, decrease in greenhouse gas emissions, particularly CO2. Join Ray Leonard via Zoom on June 15 at 12:00 GMT+1

Recent Latin America & Caribbean Videos

Conveners: Lizbeth Calizaya, Ecopetrol Brasil; Renato Darros de Matos, Independent Researcher and Consultant Participants: Márcio Mello, Brazil Petroleum Studies; Sean Romito, University of Houston; Hualing Zhang, University of Houston; Tom Wilson, Core Laboratories UK; Randall Etherington, TGS; Pedro Victor Zalan, ZAG Consulting in Petroleum Exploration Conveners Lizbeth Calizaya and Renato Darros de Matos moderate a discussion with presenters, who answer questions and share final thoughts to conclude Session IV, Northeast Brazilian Basins, at the South Atlantic Basins Virtual Research Symposium. Bios: Convener: Lizbeth Calizaya, Ecopetrol Brasil Convener: Renato Darros de Matos, Guarini Services Renato is geologist graduated from the Universidade de Brasília, Brazil (1979) and holds a PhD from Cornell University (1992). He has 40 years of professional experience, which includes 21 years at Petrobras, 4 years at academia (UFRN) as researcher, founder of Flamoil Services, E&P Director of Potioleo, Aurizonia and Imetame Energia (small independent oil companies); Coordinator and first President of ABPIP (Brazilian Independent Petroleum Producers Association); Exploration Manager of Petrobras International in Libya and Turkey; Management Director of the first board of the government controlled PPSA (Pré-Sal Petróleo S.A.). Currently, he is Director and Senior E&P Consultant at Guarini Services, Natal and Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Renato is a member of AAPG, ABGP and SBGf. Marcio Rocha Mello, Brazilpetrostudies (BPS) Marcio holds a PhD from Bristol University, England. With 43 years of experience in the industry, he is the President of Brazilpetrostudies (BPS), Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Prior to BPS he worked at Petrobras, HRT Petroleum. Marcio is a member of AAPG, ABGP and ALAGO. Sean Romito, University of Houston Sean earned a BSc in Geology from the University of Texas at Dallas, and currently is a PhD candidate and research assistant at the University of Houston, where he develops large-scale tectonic research within the Caribbean plate and the Brazilian passive margin. He has experience as intern on prospect generation within onshore US basins; field work as a wellsite geologist in the Permian; and intern on geologic risk within the Texas panhandle. Sean is a member of AAPG and HGS. Hualing Zhang, University of Houston Hualing is a PhD student at the University of Houston. She is a member of AAPG and AGU. Tom Wilson, Core Laboratories Tom is a geologist from Kingston University and holds a MSc in Palynology from Sheffield University. With 24 years of experience in the industry, he is Senior Geological Advisor at Core Laboratories, UK, where, as part of the regional studies group his main technical role is reviewing stratigraphic data, coordinating new analyses and interpreting the results to produce consistent stratigraphic interpretations and well correlations; working with regional and reservoir geologists to place the well data in tectono-stratigraphic context, better understanding basin evolution, reservoir distribution and reservoir quality. He spent 16 years at Robertson, initially as a palynologist working principally on West African basins. Subsequently moved to multi-client studies as a Petroleum Geologist looking at basins in the South Atlantic and then around the globe. A move to the proprietary studies department resulted in a change to working on license rounds and prospect analysis, later becoming a Technical Advisor in this department. Upon leaving Robertson he went to Xodus as a Senior Geologist looking at exploration opportunities in Africa and then spent 3 years in the Central North Sea exploration team at Eon E&P, before joining Core Lab early 2017. Tom is a member of AAPG, PESGP and Micropalaeontological Society, Randall Etherington, TGS-NOPEC Geophysical Company Randall earned a bachelor’s degree in Engineering from Utah State University, and a MSc in Geology from Brigham Young University. His more than 40 years of experience in the industry include several positions in companies as ExxonMobil, Chevron, Shell, Phillips, Devon, YPF-Regsol, Pennzoil, Cobalt, Murphy; Maersk, among others. Currently, he is Exploration Advisor at TGS-NOPEC Geophysical Company, where is responsible for geophysical interpretation and basin analysis. Randall is a member of AAPG and SEG. Pedro Victor Zalán, ZAG Consulting in Petroleum Exploration Pedro holds a MSc and a PhD from the Colorado School of Mines. With 42 years of experience in the industry, he is independent consultant in petroleum exploration at ZAG Consulting in Petroleum Exploration, in Rio de Janeiro. He worked for 34 years in Petrobras. Pedro is a member of AAPG and ABGP.
Authors: Pedro Victor Zalan (presenter), ZAG Consulting in Petroleum Exploration; Eric Newman, Mike Saunders, TGS With the fantastic exploratory success obtained by ExxonMobil and Apache in Guyana and Suriname it is logical to follow the trend southeastwards, passing through the Zaedyus discovery in French Guyana, into the Foz do Amazonas and Pará-Maranhão Basins in Brazil (Figure 1). The northern portion of the FOZ, bordering French Guyana, had several blocks adjudicated to majors that had acquired 3D seismic and defined several drilling locations aiming stratigraphic traps similar to the discoveries further north. New long-offset, broadband reprocessed, 2D seismic data acquired in deep/ultra-deep waters in the southern part of the FOZ and in PAMA, have unraveled the exciting geology and the enormous petroleum potential of these basins. Three distinct seismic-stratigraphic sequences were mapped in the Drift Sequence: (1) a basal unit composed of Late Albian-Coniacian source rocks, plus abundant turbidite bodies, followed by (2) an intermediate unit displaying low-energy seismic facies, typical of effective seal strata, plus Santonian-Lower Paleogene turbidite bodies, capped by (3) Upper Paleogene-Neogene shales/claystones and enormous amounts of turbidite bodies (Figure 2). The source rock strata had been downwarped by the load exerted by the Amazon Cone and by huge volcanic edifices to depths spanning the entire thermal maturation range (Figure 2). One regional and one local HC kitchens were mapped. HCs emanating from these kitchens tend to migrate towards the compensation highs created in response to these downwarps in the Pará-Maranhão Basin (Figure 2). On these migration routes innumerous stratigraphic and mixed traps were identified, some with very large dimensions, some with strong DHI response (Figures 3-6). The scenario is ready for the replication of the exploratory success happening in Guyana and Suriname and, across the Ocean, in Ghana and Ivory Coast. Bio: Pedro Victor Zalán, ZAG Consulting in Petroleum Exploration Pedro holds a MSc and a PhD from the Colorado School of Mines. With 42 years of experience in the industry, he is independent consultant in petroleum exploration at ZAG Consulting in Petroleum Exploration, in Rio de Janeiro. He worked for 34 years in Petrobras. Pedro is a member of AAPG and ABGP.
Authors: Randall Etherington (presenter); Eric Newman, TGS The Potiguar Basin is the largest oil-producing region in equatorial Brazil along the onshore and near offshore areas of the basin. The petroleum system of the basin contains lacustrine to marine prolific source rocks of rift to post-rift spanning in age from Barremian through Turonian. Proven reservoir rocks range in age from Barremian to Eocene times. Seal rocks are observed throughout the entire stratigraphic column and are represented by intra-formational lacustrine shales, fine-grained argillaceous sandstones and shales, and thick deep marine pelitic rocks. The Pitu well, announced in December of 2013 became the first deep water oil discovery of the Potiguar Basin. The Pitu well found a 188 meter hydrocarbon column in Upper Aptian sands of the Pescada Formation in a rift structure at depths of 4,300 meters, thus confirming that the proven petroleum system extends into the deep water. Two main play types have been identified. The confirmed ‘Rift’ play which follows the Potiguar oil basin off the shelf is the same play as Pitu and extends across all of the basin. The well-defined horst blocks at Pescada Formation level show several thickened intervals. The greatly anticipated ‘Drift’ Late Cretaceous-Tertiary play is a turbidite sand play of channel sands and toe of slope fans, many with amplitude anomalies. Broadband, long offset 2D seismic clearly shows the Aptian ‘Rift’ play and evidence of the ‘Drift’ Late Cretaceous-Tertiary turbidite channel complex and basin floor fans. The most recent 3D data takes the seismic image and detail of the Cretaceous turbidite channel/fan complexes and Aptian ‘Rift’ structures to an all-new level. Bio: Randall Etherington, TGS-NOPEC Geophysical Company Randall earned a bachelor’s degree in Engineering from Utah State University, and a MSc in Geology from Brigham Young University. His more than 40 years of experience in the industry include several positions in companies as ExxonMobil, Chevron, Shell, Phillips, Devon, YPF-Regsol, Pennzoil, Cobalt, Murphy; Maersk, among others. Currently, he is Exploration Advisor at TGS-NOPEC Geophysical Company, where is responsible for geophysical interpretation and basin analysis. Randall is a member of AAPG and SEG.
Authors: Tom Wilson (presenter), Joseph Whiting, Corneliu Cosovanu, Ann Watkins, Anne McAfee, Core Laboratories UK The emergence of a significant submarine fan play, in the ultra-deep waters of the Sergipe Basin, is exemplified by 6 discoveries since 2010. This paper integrates biostratigraphic and sedimentological data to better understand the evolution of the Late Cretaceous deep-water fan systems. Success in the Calumbi play, for example in the Barra, Moita Bonita and Farfan discoveries, is characterised by accumulations within stratigraphic traps basinwards of the Alagoas Hinge Line. Biostratigraphic analysis of exploration wells shows Upper Cretaceous sediment packages, which are thin or absent on the present-day shelf, thicken outboard of the Hinge Line. These packages can be related to the Drift-Transgressive and Regressive sequences and are associated with channel and fan sands. The marked increase in accommodation space occurred during the transition and drift phases, initiated by a basinward shift in the rift / spreading axis. Hyperextension of the continental crust, emplacement of magmatic crust and SDRs gave way to thermal sag and an increase in accommodation space in the outboard region. Extensive core logging of Upper Cretaceous Calumbi sections allowed the differentiation of interbedded coarse-grained sand and gravel-rich intervals into turbidity current and hyperpycnal surge facies, driven by increased fluvial discharge (figure A.). These sediments were transported across a narrow shelf and preserved within stacked channel systems on the steep and terraced slope. Observed facies include inboard bypass deposits giving way to levee-confined slope systems consisting of amalgamated channel complex sets and associated mass transport deposits, and distal lobes characterised by discrete low-density flows. These rock-based observations are integrated with downhole logs and information on the regional geology to extrapolate the sedimentary succession and create palaeogeographic maps. Bio: Tom Wilson, Core Laboratories Tom is a geologist from Kingston University and holds a MSc in Palynology from Sheffield University. With 24 years of experience in the industry, he is Senior Geological Advisor at Core Laboratories, UK, where, as part of the regional studies group his main technical role is reviewing stratigraphic data, coordinating new analyses and interpreting the results to produce consistent stratigraphic interpretations and well correlations; working with regional and reservoir geologists to place the well data in tectono-stratigraphic context, better understanding basin evolution, reservoir distribution and reservoir quality. He spent 16 years at Robertson, initially as a palynologist working principally on West African basins. Subsequently moved to multi-client studies as a Petroleum Geologist looking at basins in the South Atlantic and then around the globe. A move to the proprietary studies department resulted in a change to working on license rounds and prospect analysis, later becoming a Technical Advisor in this department. Upon leaving Robertson he went to Xodus as a Senior Geologist looking at exploration opportunities in Africa and then spent 3 years in the Central North Sea exploration team at Eon E&P, before joining Core Lab early 2017. Tom is a member of AAPG, PESGP and Micropalaeontological Society,

Webinars

Other Videos