Explorer Foundation Update

Russell A. Dorsey Jr. was an AAPG member who loved adventure, loved traveling and spent more than 30 years using his skills as a geologist for Esso and ExxonMobil in locations around the world. His wife, Mary, a Florida native with an ear for languages plus musical and artistic gifts of her own, equally embraced the journeys that Russell’s geological career afforded them, and together they left a record of not just involvement in but active impact on historical, archaeological, civic and cultural groups wherever they resided. Both are now deceased – Russell in 2001, and Mary earlier this year on May 19 – but their love of preservation and working together to help ensure better futures to global populations was manifested once again recently in a dramatic way for the AAPG Foundation.

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American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Explorer Foundation Update

Emma Giddens was a California girl who fell in love with carbonate rocks, excelled in nearly everything she tried, led her IBA team to a Selley Cup victory and even as a graduate student was known internationally for her “pioneering” research. In fact, professors at three schools marveled at her passion for geology, her intelligence, her kindness and mentorship of fellow students. Tragically, Giddens died shortly after receiving word that her research was being honored with an AAPG Foundation Grant-in-Aid.

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American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Explorer Article

Joshua Rosenfeld’s article in the April EXPLORER issue’s Historical Highlights provides an interesting compilation of observations selected to support an unproven hypothesis: that the large influx of Paleogene Wilcox sandstones in the Gulf of Mexico can be linked to a major evaporative drawdown of the basin, loosely aligned with and possibly triggering the Paleocene-Eocene thermal event. We offer our observations based on decades of oil industry experience working the Wilcox play, more than 55 peer- reviewed academic papers and one book on Gulf of Mexico sedimentary basin.

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American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Explorer Historical Highlights

It all started in 2002, when Unocal revealed that its Trident-1 well had found 400 meters of 70-percent net Lower Wilcox Formation sand in the deepwater Gulf of Mexico, about 400 kilometers beyond the contemporaneous shelf break offshore south Texas. Art Berman and I gazed at a GOM activity map and pondered how that amount of sand could have been deposited so far out into the basin. Our working hypothesis was that this sand deposit was due to a drop in base level, but we also knew that the worldwide sea level was not in decline at that time. A log of the nearby Shell Great White well shows that this sand deposition began suddenly and ended suddenly. This was also puzzling, since we were trained to expect gradational coarsening-upward bedding during regression and fining-upward during transgression, rather than the sharp contacts we were seeing. Sudden avulsion of a major river in a deltaic environment could produce something like this, but how could it happen far beyond the shelf edge?

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American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Explorer Article

The U.S. Gulf of Mexico often receives attention for its hydrocarbon potential in the Upper Jurassic and younger rocks in deep and shallow water. Increasingly more people are looking to another potential habitat for hydrocarbons, the syn-rift and associated sections, also known as the Gulf of Mexico pre-salt.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Explorer Article

With a new batch of freshman lawmakers in Congress, there has been increasing attention on a proposed “Green New Deal” to aggressively tackle climate change, among other issues. But how feasible is it?

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Explorer Article

November’s midterm elections in the United States brought a split decision and gave the country a divided Congress. The potential effect of the vote on the oil and gas industry and U.S. energy policy is also a toss-up, according to some analysts.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Explorer President’s Column

I’m writing November’s President’s Column on day 19 after Hurricane Michael devasted the Panhandle communities in Bay County, Florida on Oct. 10, 2018. I was driving from the AAPG Eastern Section Meeting in Pittsburgh, Pa. to the California University of Pennsylvania for an AAPG Visiting Geoscientist lecture and pulled to the side of the road to watch the weather radar at 12:43 p.m. as the west side of the eye of a hurricane, two knots shy of a Category 5, passed over my hometown of Panama City.

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American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Explorer Article

The American Petroleum Institute has a new coalition to promote offshore exploration, and not everybody is happy about it.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Explorer Emphasis Article

So-called “academic freedom” bills at various stages in state legislatures could threaten the integrity of science education in public schools.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Online e-Symposium
Thursday, 11 February 2010, 12:00 a.m.–12:00 a.m.

Gas hydrates, ice-like substances composed of water and gas molecules (methane, ethane, propane, etc.), occur in permafrost areas and in deep water marine environments.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Online e-Symposium
Thursday, 9 February 2012, 12:00 a.m.–12:00 a.m.

Projects in several shales will be discussed, including Marcellus, Eagle Ford, Haynesville, Fayetteville, Montney, and Barnett, as will several seismically-detectable drivers for success including lithofacies, stress, pre-existing fractures, and pore pressure.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Online e-Symposium
Friday, 20 January 2012, 12:00 a.m.–12:00 a.m.

The Eagle Ford Shale in South Texas is one of the more exciting shale plays in the United States at the current time.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Online e-Symposium
Thursday, 19 May 2011, 12:00 a.m.–12:00 a.m.

This e-symposium presents and discusses the results of laboratory tests and research relating to determining shale prospectivity in general, and specifically in the Black Warrior Basin, Alabama.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Online e-Symposium
Thursday, 20 August 2009, 12:00 a.m.–12:00 a.m.

This e-symposium covers advances in geothermal energy, integration with petroleum operations, and lessons learned in recent cases.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Online e-Symposium
Thursday, 10 May 2012, 12:00 a.m.–12:00 a.m.

Recognition and Correlation of the Eagle Ford, Austin Formations in South Texas can be enhanced with High Resolution Biostratigraphy, fossil abundance peaks and Maximum Flooding Surfaces correlated to Upper Cretaceous sequence stratigraphic cycle chart after Gradstein, 2010.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Online e-Symposium
Thursday, 11 November 2010, 12:00 a.m.–12:00 a.m.

This e-symposium is ideal for geologists, geophysicists, engineers and other geoscientists who are involved in gas shale exploration and production.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Online e-Symposium
Thursday, 12 July 2012, 12:00 a.m.–12:00 a.m.

This presentation will look at well placement vertically in the pay, well azimuth and well trajectory with explanations of how geology and post-depositional effects can make the difference between a successful well and a failure.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Carbonate Sedimentologist Research Associate

The Reservoir characterization Research Laboratory (RCRL) at the Bureau of Economic Geology (BEG) of the Jackson School of Geosciences at The University of Texas at Austin is seeking a full-time researcher to develop areas of existing and emerging research on carbonate systems as it relates to applied subsurface geology. Candidates that have experience in mixed carbonate-siliciclastics stratigraphy and sedimentology are preferred.

Tenure-Track Faculty Position in Atmospheric Sciences

The University of Houston Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences (EAS) invites applications for a tenure-track position in Atmospheric Science at the assistant professor level. This position request seeks a dynamic researcher and educator who can establish an externally funded research program in the field of Atmospheric Dynamics. This position is open to candidates whose research interest may cover any spatial scale in the climate system. Candidates with modeling and/or experimental background are encouraged to apply.

VG Abstract

In 1991, Gulf Indonesia and its partners discovered South Sumatra Basin’s first major gas field at Dayung in the Corridor PSC. A key feature of this field is that most of the reserves are held within fractured basement rocks of pre-Tertiary age. 

Request a visit from Charles Caughey!

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)

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