American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Explorer Article

Oklahoma! As-yet unlocked SCOOP and STACK plays have plen’y of room for maturation and development.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Explorer Article

'The Great American Carbonate Bank' sounds like a great read, doesn't it? Hear what Bill Morgan has to share about this memoir from a great sedimentologist, paleontologist and educator - James Lee Wilson.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Explorer Article

The Distinguished Lecture program, funded in part by the AAPG Foundation, is the Association’s flagship initiative for spreading the latest in science, technology and professional information.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Explorer Geophysical Corner

Last month in this space we analyzed the relations of fracture patterns and layer curvature in clay models. This month we examine these relations in a central Oklahoma field developed by Pathfinder Exploration, Norman, Okla.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Explorer Emphasis Article

After decades spent visiting Morocco and neighboring Algeria, an AAPG member who's led countless field trips to some of the earth's most exotic places says the two old countries are evolving into modern times.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Field Seminar
Naples, Italy
Friday, 24 June Saturday, 25 June 2022, 8:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m.

Field Trip Leaders: Jean Borgomano – CEREGE, Aix-Marseille Université, France Michele Morsilli – University of Ferrara, Italy Fees: €450 + VAT Fee Includes: Transportation during the field trip Overnight Accommodation Breakfast, lunch 2 days and dinner Themes The Gargano Promontory (southern Italy) offers the opportunity to investigate a complete carbonate facies transect from inner platform to basin and to reconstruct the various events that shaped and controlled the evolution of the Apulia Carbonate Platform during the Cretaceous and Paleogene. This area can be considered a wonderful outcrop analog to better understand and visualize facies, depositional geometries, stratigraphic relationships and to compare them with other carbonate platforms. The exposed carbonate rocks show well-preserved original reservoir properties and form relevant analogues of subsurface reservoirs located in different structural settings; e.g. inner platform palaeokarst (Ombrina Mare, Rospo Mare oil fields), subthrust setting (Monte Alpi, Tempa Rossa), slope, base-of-slope resedimented carbonate facies (Elsa, Miglianico, Aquila, Rovesti), as well as relevant for the comparison with the specular Adriatic Carbonate Platform (AdCP) or other Tethyan carbonate systems. Main goals of this field trip are the observation of the facies and stratigraphic architecture of the inner platform and of slope and base-of-slope units deposited during the Early - Late Cretaceous and Eocene, as well as the carbonate production and exporting/resedimentation processes. The Apulia Carbonate Platform represents a well-known case study of a carbonate platform with different evolution through time. Facies distribution from inner platform to base-of-slope, stratigraphic architecture and depositional geometries, together with retreat and drowning of the platform or margin collapses, and seismic-scale outcrops, in a relatively poorly deformed context, constitute a text book examples of a Cretaceous Carbonate System. Itinerary and Stops Day 1 Naples (or Bari airport) to Apricena by bus (travel about 3 h) Stop 1.1 - Apricena quarries district: stop on peritidal cycles of Lower Cretaceous, fractured and karst reservoir (outcrop analog of the Rospo Mare oil field). Lunch Stop 1.2 - Belvedere di Ruggiano: stop on scalloped/faulted platform margin of mid-Cretaceous and base of slope to basin facies associations. Night in Monte Sant’Angelo Day 2 Stop 2.1 Monte Sant’Angelo: slope to basin facies of the Lower Cretaceous and facies observation of the resedimented succession of the Upper Cretaceous. Lunch Stop 2.2 Monte Sant’Angelo to Manfredonia road – Upper Cretaceous slope to base of slope facies and architecture of the systems. Stop 2.3 (optional) - Monte Saraceno-Mattinata: panoramic view of the Upper Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous sequence and Valanginian retreating/drowning of the Apulia Platform and depositional geometries of the Eocene clinoforms. End of the Excursion (travel to Naples or Bari airport)

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American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Workshop
Naples, Italy
Wednesday, 22 June Thursday, 23 June 2022, 8:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m.

Modelling carbonate sequences and reservoirs has always been a challenging task. Carbonate rocks are generated and subsequently modified by a large variety of biological, physical and chemical processes that start at the time of deposition and end today. To unravel the geological evolution and history of carbonate sequences is fundamental not only for understanding their hydrocarbons potential but also for their role as potential reservoirs for renewable energy (geothermal) or geological gas storage (CO2 and hydrogen). Several science disciplines are often involved to fully understand the characteristics of carbonate rocks and old approaches and new technologies and tools are nowadays applied in these types of sequences. The objective of this meeting is to allow scientists and engineers working on carbonate rocks in academia and industry to share their most recent experience, work, approaches and use of innovative technologies to increase the understanding of the very complex world of carbonates.

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American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
VG Abstract

This lecture will discuss the differences between carbonates and siliciclastics from their chemical composition through their distributions in time and space. Building on these fundamental differences, we will explore the challenges carbonates pose to petroleum geologists in terms of seismic interpretation, reservoir quality prediction, field development, etc. Peppered with humorous personal stories, still raging academic debates, and the heartfelt frustrations of real industry professionals, the aim is to inspire students and young professionals to rise to the occasion and embrace the reservoir rocks that petroleum geologists love to hate.

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Request a visit from Noelle Joy Purcell!

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
VG Abstract

The carbonate sequences that were deposited in the now exhumed Tethyan Ocean influence many aspects of our lives today, either by supplying the energy that warms our homes and the fuel that powers our cars or providing the stunning landscapes for both winter and summer vacations. They also represent some of the most intensely studied rock formations in the world and have provided geoscientists with a fascinating insight into the turbulent nature of 250 Million years of Earth’s history. By combining studies from the full range of geoscience disciplines this presentation will trace the development of these carbonate sequences from their initial formation on the margins of large ancient continental masses to their present day locations in and around the Greater Mediterranean and Near East region. The first order control on growth patterns and carbonate platform development by the regional plate-tectonic setting, underlying basin architecture and fluctuations in sea level will be illustrated. The organisms that contribute to sequence development will be revealed to be treasure troves of forensic information. Finally, these rock sequences will be shown to contain all the ingredients necessary to form and retain hydrocarbons and the manner in which major post-depositional tectonic events led to the formation of some of the largest hydrocarbon accumulations in the world will be demonstrated.

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Request a visit from Keith Gerdes!

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)

Related Interests

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