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Major 'Caribbean plate' survey by Moscow-based consortium 'Geology Without Limits' to commence soon, will bring together leading scientists from around the world.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
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After decades spent visiting Morocco and neighboring Algeria, an AAPG member who's led countless field trips to some of the earth's most exotic places says the two old countries are evolving into modern times.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
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Long captivated by both the onshore and offshore possibilities in Colombia, operators are hoping to turn Caribbean potential into reality soon.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
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Sequence stratigraphy and coal cycles based on accommodation trends were investigated in the coal-bearing Lower Cretaceous Mannville Group in the Lloydminster heavy oil field, eastern Alberta. The study area is in a low accommodation setting on the cratonic margin of the Western Canada sedimentary basin. Geophysical log correlation of coal seams, shoreface facies, and the identification of incised valleys has produced a sequence-stratigraphic framework for petrographic data from 3 cored and 115 geophysical-logged wells. Maceral analysis, telovitrinite reflectance, and fluorescence measurements were taken from a total of 206 samples. Three terrestrial depositional environments were interpreted from the petrographic data: ombrotrophic mire coal, limnotelmatic mire coal, and carbonaceous shale horizons. Accommodation-based coal (wetting- and drying-upward) cycles represent trends in depositional environment shifts, and these cycles were used to investigate the development and preservation of the coal seams across the study area.

The low-accommodation strata are characterized by a high-frequency occurrence of significant surfaces, coal seam splitting, paleosol, and incised-valley development. Three sequence boundary unconformities are identified in only 20 m (66 ft) of strata. Coal cycle correlations illustrate that each coal seam in this study area was not produced by a single peat-accumulation episode but as an amalgamation of a series of depositional events. Complex relations between the Cummings and Lloydminster coal seams are caused by the lateral fragmentation of strata resulting from the removal of sediment by subaerial erosion or periods of nondeposition. Syndepositional faulting of the underlying basement rock changed local accommodation space and increased the complexity of the coal cycle development.

This study represents a low-accommodation example from a spectrum of stratigraphic studies that have been used to establish a terrestrial sequence-stratigraphic model. The frequency of changes in coal seam quality is an important control on methane distribution within coalbed methane reservoirs and resource calculations in coal mining. A depositional model based on the coal cycle correlations, as shown by this study, can provide coal quality prediction for coalbed methane exploration, reservoir completions, and coal mining.

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This article reviews the mechanisms of shale gas storage and discusses the major risks or uncertainties for shale gas exploration in China. At a given temperature and pressure, the gas sorption capacities of organic-rich shales are primarily controlled by the organic matter richness but may be significantly influenced by the type and maturity of the organic matter, mineral composition (especially clay content), moisture content, pore volume and structure, resulting in different ratios of gas sorption capacity (GSC) to total organic carbon content for different shales. In laboratory experiments, the GSC of organic-rich shales increases with increasing pressure and decreases with increasing temperature. Under geologic conditions (assuming hydrostatic pressure gradient and constant thermal gradient), the GSC increases initially with depth due to the predominating effect of pressure, passes through a maximum, and then decreases because of the influence of increasing temperature at greater depth. This pattern of variation is quite similar to that observed for coals and is of great significance for understanding the changes in GSC of organic-rich shales over geologic time as a function of burial history. At an elevated temperature and pressure and with the presence of moisture, the gas sorption capacities of organic-rich shales are quite low. As a result, adsorption alone cannot protect sufficient gas for high-maturity organic-rich shales to be commercial gas reservoirs. Two models are proposed to predict the variation of GSC and total gas content over geologic time as a function of burial history. High contents of free gas in organic-rich shales can be preserved in relatively closed systems. Loss of free gas during postgeneration uplift and erosion may result in undersaturation (the total gas contents lower than the sorption capacity) and is the major risk for gas exploration in marine organic-rich shales in China.
Show more American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
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Anomalously high porosities and permeabilities are commonly found in the fluvial channel sandstone facies of the Triassic Skagerrak Formation in the central North Sea at burial depths greater than 3200 m (10,499 ft), from which hydrocarbons are currently being produced. The aim of our study was to improve understanding of sandstone diagenesis in the Skagerrak Formation to help predict whether the facies with high porosity may be found at even greater depths. The Skagerrak sandstones comprise fine to medium-grained arkosic to lithic-arkosic arenites. We have used scanning electron microscopy, petrographic analysis, pressure history modeling, and core analysis to assess the timing of growth and origin of mineral cements, with generation, and the impact of high fluid pressure on reservoir quality. Our interpretation is that the anomalously high porosities in the Skagerrak sandstones were maintained by a history of overpressure generation and maintenance from the Late Triassic onward, in combination with early microquartz cementation and subsequent precipitation of robust chlorite grain coats. Increasing salinity of pore fluids during burial diagenesis led to pore-filling halite cements in sustained phreatic conditions. The halite pore-filling cements removed most of the remaining porosity and limited the precipitation of other diagenetic phases. Fluid flow associated with the migration of hydrocarbons during the Neogene is inferred to have dissolved the halite locally. Dissolution of halite cements in the channel sands has given rise to megapores and porosities of as much as 35% at current production depths.
Show more American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
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The Heidrun field, located on the Halten Terrace of the mid-Norwegian continental shelf, was one of the first giant oil fields found in the Norwegian Sea. Traditional reservoir intervals in the Heidrun field lie within the Jurassic synrift sequence. Most Norwegian continental shelf fields have been producing from these Jurassic reservoirs for the past 30 yr. Production has since declined in these mature fields, but recently, exploration for new reservoirs has resurged in this region. The Jurassic rifted fault blocks form a narrow continental shelf in Norway, thereby greatly reducing the areal extent for exploration and development within existing fields. As the rift axis is approached farther offshore, these Jurassic reservoirs become very deep, too risky to drill, and uneconomical. This risk has prompted exploration in more recent years of the shallower Cretaceous, postrift stratigraphic succession. Cretaceous turbidites have been found in the Norwegian and North Seas, and the discovery of the Agat field in the Norwegian North Sea confirms the existence of a working petroleum system capable of charging Cretaceous reservoirs. These Cretaceous reservoirs were deposited as slope- and basin-floor fans within a series of underfilled rifted deeps along the Norwegian continental shelf and are thought to be sourced from the localized erosion of Jurassic rifted highs. We use three-dimensional seismic and well data to document the geomorphology of a deep-water, Lower Cretaceous wedge (Cromer Knoll Group) within the hanging wall of a rift-related half graben formed on the Halten Terrace offshore mid-Norway. Seismic attribute extractions taken within this Lower Cretaceous wedge reveal the presence of several lobate to elongated bodies that seem to cascade over fault-bounded terraces associated with rifted structures. These high-amplitude, elongated bodies are interpreted as deep-water sedimentary conduits that are time equivalent to the Cretaceous basin-floor fans in more distal parts of the basin to the west. These half-graben fills have the potential to contain high-quality Cretaceous sandstones that might represent a potential new reservoir interval within the Heidrun field.
Show more American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
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We describe the structure, microstructure, and petrophysical properties of fault rocks from two normal fault zones formed in low-porosity turbiditic arkosic sandstones, in deep diagenesis conditions similar to those of deeply buried reservoirs. These fault rocks are characterized by a foliated fabric and quartz-calcite sealed veins, which formation resulted from the combination of the (1) pressure solution of quartz, (2) intense fracturing sealed by quartz and calcite cements, and (3) neoformation of synkinematic white micas derived from the alteration of feldspars and chlorite. Fluid inclusion microthermometry in quartz and calcite cements demonstrates fault activity at temperatures of 195degC to 268degC. Permeability measurements on plugs oriented parallel with the principal axes of the finite strain ellipsoid show that the Y axis (parallel with the foliation and veins) is the direction of highest permeability in the foliated sandstone (10–2 md for Y against 10–3 md for X, Z, and the protolith, measured at a confining pressure of 20 bars). Microstructural observations document the localization of the preferential fluid path between the phyllosilicate particles forming the foliation. Hence, the direction of highest permeability in these fault rocks would be parallel with the fault and subhorizontal, that is, perpendicular to the slickenlines representing the local slip direction on the fault surface. We suggest that a similar relationship between kinematic markers and fault rock permeability anisotropy may be found in other fault zone types (reverse or strike-slip) affecting feldspar-rich lithologies in deep diagenesis conditions.
Show more American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
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The McMurray Formation of northern Alberta in Canada contains multiscale complex geologic features that were partially formed in a fluvial-estuarine depositional environment. The inclined heterolithic strata deposited as part of fluvial point bars contain continuous centimeter-scale features that are important for flow characterization of steam-assisted gravity drainage processes. These channels are common, extensive, and imbricated over many square kilometers. Modeling the detailed facies in such depositional systems requires a methodology that reflects heterogeneity over many scales. This article presents an object-based facies modeling technique that (1) reproduces the geometry of multiscale geologic architectural elements seen in the McMurray Formation outcrops and (2) provides a grid-free framework that models these geologic objects without relating them to a grid system. The grid-free object-based modeling can be applied to any depositional environment and allows for the complete preservation of architectural information for consistent application to any gridding scheme, local grid refinements, downscaling, upscaling, drape surface, locally variable azimuths, property trend modeling, and flexible model interaction and manipulation. Features millimeters thick or kilometers in extent are represented very efficiently in the same model.
Show more American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
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A new hierarchical architectural classification for clastic marginal-marine depositional systems is presented and illustrated with examples. In ancient rocks, the architectural scheme effectively integrates the scales of sedimentology (core, outcrop) and sequence stratigraphy (wireline-log correlation, reflection seismic). The classification also applies to modern sediments, which allows for direct comparison of architectural units between modern and ancient settings. In marginal-marine systems, the parasequence typically defines reservoir flow units. This classification addresses subparasequence scales of stratigraphy that commonly control fluid flow in these reservoirs. The scheme consists of seven types of architectural units that are placed on five architectural hierarchy levels: hierarchy level I: element (E) and element set (ES); hierarchy level II: element complex (EC) and element complex set (ECS); hierarchy level III: element complex assemblage (ECA); hierarchy level IV: element complex assemblage set (ECAS); and hierarchy level V: transgressive-regressive sequence (T-R sequence). Architectural units in levels I to III are further classified relative to dominant depositional processes (wave, tide, and fluvial) acting at the time of deposition. All architectural units are three-dimensional and can also be expressed in terms of plan-view and cross-sectional geometries. Architectural units can be linked using tree data structures by a set of familial relationships (parent-child, siblings, and cousins), which provides a novel mechanism for managing uncertainty in marginal-marine systems. Using a hierarchical scheme permits classification of different data types at the most appropriate architectural scale. The use of the classification is illustrated in ancient settings by an outcrop and subsurface example from the Campanian Bearpaw–Horseshoe Canyon Formations transition, Alberta, Canada, and in modern settings, by the Mitchell River Delta, northern Australia. The case studies illustrate how the new classification can be used across both modern and ancient systems, in complicated, mixed-process depositional environments.
Show more American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
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In-Person Training
Houston Texas United States 24 January, 2017 25 January, 2017 33528 Desktop /Portals/0/PackFlashItemImages/WebReady/gtw-deepwater-shelf-2016-hero.jpg?width=100&height=100&mode=crop&anchor=middlecenter&quality=75amp;encoder=freeimage&progressive=true Engineering, Development and Operations, Reservoir Characterization, Geochemistry and Basin Modeling, Basin Modeling, Geophysics, Clastics, Sedimentology and Stratigraphy, Deep Sea / Deepwater, Deepwater Turbidites, Shelf Sand Deposits, Structure, Structural Analysis (Other), Fractured Carbonate Reservoirs, Stratigraphic Traps, Subsalt Traps
 
Houston, Texas, United States
24-25 January 2017

The goal of this event is to bring together new technologies and developments in both exploring for new frontiers and developing known provinces in both deepwater and shelf environments. The event brings together geology, geochemistry, engineering, and geophysics.

Yangon Myanmar 21 February, 2017 21 February, 2017 36773 Desktop /Portals/0/PackFlashItemImages/WebReady/AAPG-EAGE-MGS-Myanmar-Geosciences-Conference-Hero-v2.jpg?width=100&height=100&mode=crop&anchor=middlecenter&quality=75amp;encoder=freeimage&progressive=true Structure, Geochemistry and Basin Modeling, Sedimentology and Stratigraphy, Business and Economics, Engineering, Basin Modeling, Petroleum Systems, Oil and Gas Analysis, Maturation, Clastics, Carbonates, Evaporites, Economics, Reservoir Characterization, Development and Operations, Production
 
Yangon, Myanmar
21 February 2017

Risk and Uncertainty in Offshore Exploration and Appraisal

Primary Instructor:
Mark Bentley, TRACS

Venue:
Sule Shangri-La Yangon Hotel

Pricing:
AAPG/EAGE/MGS Members : USD445
Non-Members : USD495

Fee includes course materials, lunch and two breaks.


The organizers reserve the right to cancel or reschedule courses in the event of insufficient registrations. Every effort will be made to give attendees no less than 7 business days notice of cancellation. The organizers will not be responsible for any costs incurred due to course cancellation.


Yangon Myanmar 21 February, 2017 21 February, 2017 34913 Desktop /Portals/0/PackFlashItemImages/WebReady/AAPG-EAGE-MGS-Myanmar-Geosciences-Conference-Hero-v2.jpg?width=100&height=100&mode=crop&anchor=middlecenter&quality=75amp;encoder=freeimage&progressive=true Structure, Geochemistry and Basin Modeling, Sedimentology and Stratigraphy, Business and Economics, Engineering, Basin Modeling, Petroleum Systems, Oil and Gas Analysis, Maturation, Clastics, Carbonates, Evaporites, Economics, Reservoir Characterization, Development and Operations, Production
 
Yangon, Myanmar
21 February 2017

"Mapping and Interpreting Deep Water Clastic Reservoirs"

Primary Instructor:
Robert C. Shoup, Subsurface Consultants & Associates LLC, Houston, Texas, USA.

Venue:
Sule Shangri-La Yangon Hotel

Pricing:
AAPG/EAGE/MGS Members : USD445
Non-Members : USD495

Fee includes course materials, lunch and two breaks.


The organizers reserve the right to cancel or reschedule courses in the event of insufficient registrations. Every effort will be made to give attendees no less than 7 business days notice of cancellation. The organizers will not be responsible for any costs incurred due to course cancellation.


Yangon Myanmar 25 February, 2017 28 February, 2017 34027 Desktop /Portals/0/PackFlashItemImages/WebReady/AAPG-EAGE-MGS-Myanmar-Geosciences-Conference-Hero-v2.jpg?width=100&height=100&mode=crop&anchor=middlecenter&quality=75amp;encoder=freeimage&progressive=true Structure, Geochemistry and Basin Modeling, Sedimentology and Stratigraphy, Business and Economics, Engineering, Basin Modeling, Petroleum Systems, Oil and Gas Analysis, Maturation, Clastics, Carbonates, Evaporites, Economics, Reservoir Characterization, Development and Operations, Production
 
Yangon, Myanmar
25-28 February 2017

The Myanmar Geosciences Society will offer a 4-day/3-night field trip to the Kalaw Basin to visit Mesozoic sediments of Kialaw Basin and view conspicuous surface geologic expressions of Sagaing Strike Slip Fault and Shan Boundary fault (Suture Zone), as well as various Paleozoic to Tertiary outcrops along the road sections.

Dar Es Salaam Tanzania 06 March, 2017 08 March, 2017 33259 Desktop /Portals/0/PackFlashItemImages/WebReady/sc-ar-sequence-stratigraphy-tanzania-hero-1.jpg?width=100&height=100&mode=crop&anchor=middlecenter&quality=75amp;encoder=freeimage&progressive=true Sedimentology and Stratigraphy, Business and Economics, Engineering, Clastics, Carbonates, Reserve Estimation, Reservoir Characterization, Production, Bitumen/Heavy Oil, Coalbed Methane, Stratigraphic Traps, Subsalt Traps
 
Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania
6-8 March 2017

The paradigm of sequence stratigraphy has entered a new phase and these once revolutionary concepts are now applied in pre-drill exploration at ever-increasing resolution. The concepts also prove useful in production geology, especially in enhanced oil recovery efforts in previously abandoned fields.

Miami Florida United States 26 March, 2017 01 April, 2017 36438 Desktop /Portals/0/PackFlashItemImages/WebReady/ace17-ft-01-hero.jpg?width=100&height=100&mode=crop&anchor=middlecenter&quality=75amp;encoder=freeimage&progressive=true Field Trips, Conventions, Pre-Convention, Sedimentology and Stratigraphy, Carbonates, Clastics, Transgressive Deposits
 
Miami, Florida, United States
26 March - 1 April 2017

In Conjunction with AAPG 2017 Annual Convention & Exhibition (ACE)
Carbonate rocks make up the majority of reservoirs being explored and exploited in unconventional resource plays. This trip will spend five days exploring a variety of modern, mud-dominated carbonate settings in South Florida, where the elements influencing the deposition of these unique strata will be observed first-hand and used as learning points for similar ancient deposits.

Houston Texas United States 31 March, 2017 01 April, 2017 36560 Desktop /Portals/0/PackFlashItemImages/WebReady/ace17-ft-03-hero.jpg?width=100&height=100&mode=crop&anchor=middlecenter&quality=75amp;encoder=freeimage&progressive=true Field Trips, Conventions, Pre-Convention, Sedimentology and Stratigraphy, Clastics, Fluvial Deltaic Systems, Marine
 
Houston, Texas, United States
31 March - 1 April 2017

In Conjunction with AAPG 2017 Annual Convention & Exhibition (ACE)
This course combines detailed investigations of modern fluvial, estuarine, deltaic, shoreface, and tidal inlet depositional environments with subsurface examples in core to provide participants with a more holistic understanding of the physical, chemical, and biological characteristics of shallow marine and fluvial reservoirs.

Houston Texas United States 01 April, 2017 02 April, 2017 34970 Desktop /Portals/0/PackFlashItemImages/WebReady/ace-sc-04-global-deep-water-siliciclastic-reservoirs-hero.jpg?width=100&height=100&mode=crop&anchor=middlecenter&quality=75amp;encoder=freeimage&progressive=true Conventions, Short Courses, Pre-Convention, Clastics, Sedimentology and Stratigraphy, Deep Sea / Deepwater, Deepwater Turbidites, Marine
 
Houston, Texas, United States
1-2 April 2017

In Conjunction with AAPG 2017 Annual Convention & Exhibition (ACE)
This two-day seminar is designed to provide participants with a modern appreciation of the full spectrum of deep-water reservoirs, their mechanisms of transport and deposition, their stratigraphic architecture, their predictive characteristics, and their 3D heterogeneity.

Houston Texas United States 02 April, 2017 02 April, 2017 36575 Desktop /Portals/0/PackFlashItemImages/WebReady/ace17-ft-05-hero.jpg?width=100&height=100&mode=crop&anchor=middlecenter&quality=75amp;encoder=freeimage&progressive=true Sedimentology and Stratigraphy, Field Trips, Conventions, Pre-Convention, Clastics, Fluvial Deltaic Systems
 
Houston, Texas, United States
2 April 2017

In Conjunction with AAPG 2017 Annual Convention & Exhibition (ACE)
This field trip explores Panther Creek, a natural laboratory to explore the morphology and sedimentological processes of a meandering creek system. Panther Creek is just a short drive north from Houston, tucked away just south of The Woodlands, Texas in the Montgomery County Preserve.

El Paso Texas United States 05 April, 2017 08 April, 2017 36585 Desktop /Portals/0/PackFlashItemImages/WebReady/ace17-ft-08-hero.jpg?width=100&height=100&mode=crop&anchor=middlecenter&quality=75amp;encoder=freeimage&progressive=true SEPM, Field Trips, Conventions, Post-Convention, Sedimentology and Stratigraphy, Sequence Stratigraphy, Clastics, Slope
 
El Paso, Texas, United States
5-8 April 2017

In Conjunction with AAPG 2017 Annual Convention & Exhibition (ACE)
The field trip will include stops at Shumard Canyon and Bone Canyon to observe the scale and internal architecture of submarine channels incising the bedrock of the relict platform. Other field-trip stops will include Stratotype Canyon, Black Stove Canyon, and Rest Area Gully to observe basin-restricted carbonate and siliclcastic sediment gravity flow deposits, carbonate channel-levee complexes, failure scours associated with the downslope transport of olistostromal blocks, and thick (>50 m) accumulations of recumbently folded deposits associated with these failure events.

Houston Texas United States 06 April, 2017 06 April, 2017 36592 Desktop /Portals/0/PackFlashItemImages/WebReady/ace17-ft-10-hero.jpg?width=100&height=100&mode=crop&anchor=middlecenter&quality=75amp;encoder=freeimage&progressive=true SEPM, Sedimentology and Stratigraphy, Sequence Stratigraphy, Field Trips, Conventions, Post-Convention, Clastics, Fluvial Deltaic Systems
 
Houston, Texas, United States
6 April 2017

In Conjunction with AAPG 2017 Annual Convention & Exhibition (ACE)
This field trip focuses on the late Quaternary depositional systems of the upper Texas coast, including the Brazos River and its wave-dominated delta, the Oyster Creek meanderbelt, Follets Island, the San Luis Pass tidal delta, and Galveston Island. The trip will emphasize the physical processes associated with shaping these various depositional environments, and will discuss the stratigraphic occurrence of sand bodies associated with these coastal systems. There will be a focus on linking physical processes to the geological record, and also describing the sequence stratigraphic framework of the upper Texas coastal systems.

Houston Texas United States 06 April, 2017 06 April, 2017 35070 Desktop /Portals/0/PackFlashItemImages/WebReady/Short-Course-17-Image.jpg?width=100&height=100&mode=crop&anchor=middlecenter&quality=75amp;encoder=freeimage&progressive=true Conventions, Short Courses, Post-Convention, Geochemistry and Basin Modeling, Source Rock, Clastics, Sedimentology and Stratigraphy, Marine, Reservoir Characterization, Engineering, Geochemical Fingerprinting
 
Houston, Texas, United States
6 April 2017

In Conjunction with AAPG 2017 Annual Convention & Exhibition (ACE)
This course will be aimed at geologists who study mudrocks, but the general knowledge base will be applicable to many different aspects of chemostratigraphy, mineral chemistry, and trace element geochemistry.

Little Rock Arkansas United States 06 April, 2017 08 April, 2017 36594 Desktop /Portals/0/PackFlashItemImages/WebReady/ace17-ft-11-hero.jpg?width=100&height=100&mode=crop&anchor=middlecenter&quality=75amp;encoder=freeimage&progressive=true SEPM, Clastics, Sedimentology and Stratigraphy, Deep Sea / Deepwater, Field Trips, Conventions, Post-Convention, Marine, Structure, Fold and Thrust Belts
 
Little Rock, Arkansas, United States
6-8 April 2017

In Conjunction with AAPG 2017 Annual Convention & Exhibition (ACE)
The objective of this field trip is to examine the deposits of an upper slope and slope canyon to deep basin floor deepwater depositional system developing along a Pennsylvanian-age fold and thrust belt called the Ouachita Trough. The units under study are part of the Stanley Group, Jackfork Group and the overlying Atoka Group.

Windhoek Namibia 10 April, 2017 12 April, 2017 33241 Desktop /Portals/0/PackFlashItemImages/WebReady/sc-ar-sequence-stratigraphy-a-predictive-tool-for-e-p-industry-hero-1.jpg?width=100&height=100&mode=crop&anchor=middlecenter&quality=75amp;encoder=freeimage&progressive=true Engineering, Production, Reservoir Characterization, Sedimentology and Stratigraphy, Carbonates, Clastics, Coalbed Methane, Bitumen/Heavy Oil, Subsalt Traps, Stratigraphic Traps, Business and Economics, Reserve Estimation
 
Windhoek, Namibia
10-12 April 2017

The paradigm of sequence stratigraphy has entered a new phase and these once revolutionary concepts are now applied in pre-drill exploration at ever-increasing resolution. The concepts also prove useful in production geology, especially in enhanced oil recovery efforts in previously abandoned fields.

Kampala Uganda 29 May, 2017 31 May, 2017 33266 Desktop /Portals/0/PackFlashItemImages/WebReady/sc-ar-sequence-stratigraphy-uganda-hero-1.jpg?width=100&height=100&mode=crop&anchor=middlecenter&quality=75amp;encoder=freeimage&progressive=true Sedimentology and Stratigraphy, Business and Economics, Engineering, Clastics, Carbonates, Reserve Estimation, Reservoir Characterization, Production, Bitumen/Heavy Oil, Coalbed Methane, Stratigraphic Traps, Subsalt Traps
 
Kampala, Uganda
29-31 May 2017

The paradigm of sequence stratigraphy has entered a new phase and these once revolutionary concepts are now applied in pre-drill exploration at ever-increasing resolution. The concepts also prove useful in production geology, especially in enhanced oil recovery efforts in previously abandoned fields.

Online Training
24 October, 2013 24 October, 2013 1499 Desktop /Portals/0/PackFlashItemImages/WebReady/oc-es-geomechanical-data-from-petrophysical-logs.jpg?width=100&height=100&mode=crop&anchor=middlecenter&quality=75amp;encoder=freeimage&progressive=true
 
24 October 2013

This e-symposium will be introducing signal processing techniques as a means to maximize extracting geomechanical data from petrophysical logs.

07 November, 2013 07 November, 2013 1500 Desktop /Portals/0/PackFlashItemImages/WebReady/oc-es-from-qualitative-to-quantitative-interpretations.jpg?width=100&height=100&mode=crop&anchor=middlecenter&quality=75amp;encoder=freeimage&progressive=true
 
7 November 2013

This e-symposium presentation places the interpretation of deep-water turbidites discernible in 3-D seismic inversion data within a geological context.

13 December, 2012 13 December, 2012 1494 Desktop /Portals/0/PackFlashItemImages/WebReady/oc-es-petrophysics-of-shales.jpg?width=100&height=100&mode=crop&anchor=middlecenter&quality=75amp;encoder=freeimage&progressive=true
 
13 December 2012

The course will review core data, petrophysical comparisons, rock physics modeling (including pseudo logs and mechanical properties).

08 December, 2011 08 December, 2011 1480 Desktop /Portals/0/PackFlashItemImages/WebReady/oc-es-connectivity-in-fluvial-systems.jpg?width=100&height=100&mode=crop&anchor=middlecenter&quality=75amp;encoder=freeimage&progressive=true
 
8 December 2011

This e-symposium focuses on methods for predicting connectivity within clastic fluvial systems.

01 January, 2013 01 January, 9999 1459 Desktop /Portals/0/PackFlashItemImages/WebReady/oc-cc-giant-oil-and-gas-fields.jpg?width=100&height=100&mode=crop&anchor=middlecenter&quality=75amp;encoder=freeimage&progressive=true
 
1 January 2013 - 1 January 9999

There are more approximately 1,000 oil and gas fields in the world that have been classified as "giant," containing more than 500 million barrels of recoverable oil and /or 3 trillion cubic feet of gas.

28 April, 2011 28 April, 2011 1471 Desktop /Portals/0/PackFlashItemImages/WebReady/oc-es-niobrara-petroleum-system-a-major-tight-resource-play.jpg?width=100&height=100&mode=crop&anchor=middlecenter&quality=75amp;encoder=freeimage&progressive=true
 
28 April 2011

The Niobrara Petroleum System of the U.S. Rocky Mountain Region is a major tight petroleum resource play.

17 February, 2011 17 February, 2011 1469 Desktop /Portals/0/PackFlashItemImages/WebReady/oc-es-siliclastic-sequence-stratigraphy.jpg?width=100&height=100&mode=crop&anchor=middlecenter&quality=75amp;encoder=freeimage&progressive=true
 
17 February 2011

This presentation is designed for exploration/production geologists and geological managers or reservoir engineers.

11 November, 2010 11 November, 2010 1465 Desktop /Portals/0/PackFlashItemImages/WebReady/oc-es-geochemical-evaluation-of-eagle-ford-group-source.jpg?width=100&height=100&mode=crop&anchor=middlecenter&quality=75amp;encoder=freeimage&progressive=true
 
11 November 2010

This e-symposium is ideal for geologists, geophysicists, engineers and other geoscientists who are involved in gas shale exploration and production.

29 April, 2010 29 April, 2010 1457 Desktop /Portals/0/PackFlashItemImages/WebReady/oc-es-seismic-stratigraphy-seismic-geomorphology-of-deep-water.jpg?width=100&height=100&mode=crop&anchor=middlecenter&quality=75amp;encoder=freeimage&progressive=true
 
29 April 2010

This presentation will focus on the seismic stratigraphic and seismic geomorphologic expression of deep-water deposits, including both reservoir and non-reservoir facies.

22 October, 2009 22 October, 2009 1452 Desktop /Portals/0/PackFlashItemImages/WebReady/oc-es-fluvial-stratigraphy.jpg?width=100&height=100&mode=crop&anchor=middlecenter&quality=75amp;encoder=freeimage&progressive=true
 
22 October 2009

This course can help you gain the ability to describe the complex and highly variable reservoirs, which are typified by complex internal heterogeneity.

14 February, 3000 14 February, 3000 7817 Desktop /Portals/0/PackFlashItemImages/WebReady/oc-es-generic-hero.jpg?width=100&height=100&mode=crop&anchor=middlecenter&quality=75amp;encoder=freeimage&progressive=true
 
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