Explorer Article

Using a combination of certain seismic techniques helped bring success to a team of fracture-hunting geoscientists.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Explorer Article

This is a place that’s historic, innovative, hugely resourceful and enormously complex. When it comes to energy, California has it all. 

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Explorer Emphasis Article

A team player: 3-D seismic technology is more than just a stand-alone tool – its true value shines when it is combined with other well data.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Explorer Emphasis Article

An added dimension: 3-D seismic data is an essential ingredient in operators’ efforts to understand the risks and nuances of shale plays.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Explorer Article

Have an opinion about hydraulic fracturing? So does the person next to you, which is why Steve Leifer, this year’s speaker at the upcoming DEG annual luncheon, says to look at the big picture.  

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Explorer Regions and Sections

Geoscientists and others working the booming plays of Latin America know experience is a great tool.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Explorer Article

Home grown: A recent National Petroleum Council study suggests America has enough oil resources to meet its growing demand for several decades.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Explorer Policy Watch

A wise adage states that anything worth having is not easily obtainable – and it just so happens that the most promising source of cleaner, domestic, cost-effective energy of the near future also is incredibly controversial.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Explorer Article

The way we were: 2011 was a busy year for the oil and gas industry – huge economic problems, yes, but a lot of great success stories.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Explorer Division Column DEG

The use of injected carbon dioxide for enhanced oil recovery (EOR) is a process that was first used on Jan. 26, 1972, at the SACROC unit in Scurry County, Texas. Since then carbon dioxide-enhanced oil recovery in primary production zones has expanded across the Permian Basin in west Texas and eastern New Mexico, and to a more limited extent in Kansas, Mississippi, Wyoming, Oklahoma, Colorado, Utah, Montana, Alaska and Pennsylvania – and in other countries.

Show more
American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)

Related Interests

See Also ...