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Spheres of Influence Article

Environmental issues are a worldwide concern - the Division of Environmental Geosciences has an obligation to provide science-based opinions of these issues to educate the public, government officials and other petroleum industry professionals.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Search and Discovery Article

Subsurface electromagnetic (EM) measurements, namely galvanic resistivity, EM induction, EM propagation, and dielectric dispersion, exhibit frequency dependence due to the interfacial polarization (IP) of clay minerals, clay-sized particles, and conductive minerals. Existing oil-in-place estimation methods based on subsurface EM measurements do not account for dielectric permittivity, dielectric dispersion, and dielectric permittivity anisotropy arising from the IP effects. The conventional interpretation methods generate inaccurate oil-in-place estimates in clay- and pyrite-bearing shales because they separately interpret the multi-frequency effective conductivity and permittivity using empirical models.  We introduce a new inversion-based method for accurate oil-in-place estimation in clay- and pyrite-bearing shales. The inversion algorithm is coupled with an electrochemical model that accounts for the frequency dispersion in effective conductivity and permittivity due to the above-mentioned IP effects. The proposed method jointly processes the multi-frequency effective conductivity and permittivity values computed from the subsurface EM measurements. The proposed method assumes negligible invasion, negligible borehole rugosity, and lateral and vert ical homogeneity effects.  The successful application of the new interpretation method is documented with synthetic cases and field data. Water saturation estimates in shale formations obtained with the new interpretation method are compared to those obtained with conventional methods and laboratory measurements. Conventional interpretation of multi-frequency effective conductivity and permittivity well logs in a clay- and pyrite-rich shale formation generated water saturation estimates that varied up to 0. 5 saturation units, as a function of the operating frequency of the EM measurement, at each depth along the formation interval. A joint interpretation of multifrequency conductivity and permittivity is necessary to compute the oil-in-place estimates in such formations. Estimated values of water saturation, average grain size, and surface conductance of clays in that formation are in the range of 0.4 to 0.7, 0.5 micro meter to 5 micrometer, and 5×10 - 7 S to 9×10 - 7 S, respectively. The proposed method is a novel technique to integrate effective conductivity and permittivity at various frequencies. In doing so, the method generates frequency-independent oil-in-place estimates, prevents under-estimation of hydrocarbon saturation, and identifies by-passed zones in shales.

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American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Search and Discovery Article

Relative permeability in shales is an important petrophysical parameter for purposes of accurate estimation of production rate and recovery factor, efficient secondary recovery, and effective water management. We present a method to estimate saturation-dependent relative permeability in shales based on the interpretation of the low-pressure nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherm measurements. Relative permeability were determined for 30 samples from the gas — and oil — window of Eagle Ford and Wolfcamp shale formations. These sample have low-pressure helium porosity (LPHP) in the range of 0.04 to 0.09 and total organic content (TOC) in the range of 0.02 to 0.06. The samples were ashed to study the effects of removal of organic matter on the pore size distribution, pore connectivity, and relative permeability. The estimated irreducible water saturation and residual hydrocarbon saturation are directly proportional to the TOC and LPHP, and exhibit 15% variation over the entire range. Pore connectivity, in terms of average coordination number, decreases by 33% with the increase in TOC from 0.02 to 0.06. The estimated fractal dimension is close to 2.7 for all the samples. The estimated relative permeability of aqueous phase and that of hydrocarbon phase at a given saturation is inversely proportional to the TOC. Relative permeability curves of the hydrocarbon phase for geological samples from various depths in a 100-feet interval indicate that the hydrocarbon production rate will vary drastically over the entire interval and these variations will increase as the hydrocarbon saturations reduce in the formation. In contrast, relative permeability curves of the aqueous phase suggest limited variation in water production rate over the entire interval. Further, based on the relative permeability curves, the hydrocarbon production is predicted to be negligible for hydrocarbon saturations below 50% and the water production is expected to be negligible for water saturations below than 80%. Efforts are ongoing to use the laboratory-based estimates to predict field-scale production and recovery rates.

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American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Search and Discovery Article

Measurements of fluid wetting characteristic are made routinely on rock samples. However, there are no published petrophysical models to differentiate between oil-wet and water-wet fractions of a reservoir sequence using commonly available log suites. This presentation builds on our previous publication that describes the unconventional reservoir petrophysical model we have developed (Holmes, 2014). Essentially, we define four porosity components, namely total organic carbon, clay porosity, effective porosity, and “free shale porosity.” This last component is an indirect calculation if the first three components do not sum to total porosity.  Porosity/resistivity plots can be constructed for the total porosity and interpreted in a standard fashion. These will mostly indicate a water-wet system where the effective porosity fraction is examined. A second porosity/resistivity plot compares resistivity with “free shale porosity,” and is clearly interpreted to indicate Archie saturation exponents of much larger than 2 — frequently in excess of 3 — indicating the oil-wet fraction of the reservoir system. Additionally, the plots suggest low to very low values of cementation exponent, ranging from 1.0 to 1.5.   Examples from the Bakken of Montana and North Dakota, the Niobrara of Colorado, and the Wolfcamp and Spraberry of Texas are presented showing quantitative distinction of water-wet vs. oil-wet reservoir components.

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American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Search and Discovery Article

Interpretations of thermal maturation provide critical data needed for both conventional and unconventional resource assessments. The absence of true vitrinite in pre-Devonian sediments eliminates one of the most commonly measured geothermometers used for thermal maturity determination. Programmed pyrolysis parameters like Tmax can be of limited utility given the maturity regime. However, other organic macerals are potentially available to constrain thermal maturity. The current organic petrology study has been undertaken to provide a very detailed comparison of reflectance measurements on pyrobitumens, “vitrinite-like” material and graptolites.  In the Appalachian Basin of North America, Cambrian-aged source rocks were deposited in shallow water mixed carbonate-siliciclastic depositional environments. Solid pyrobitumen material is found to occur in both lenticular lens/layer morphology as well as distinct pore-filling angular varieties. Published formulas to calculate Equivalent Reflectance (Eq. Ro) from solid bitumens have been applied to these discrete morphological populations. In addition, a newly developed formula to calculate Eq. Ro from angular pyrobitumen (VRc=0.866*BRo ang + 0.0274) is introduced based upon statistical evaluation of reflectance readings from a global dataset. “Vitrinite-like” organic macerals were found in rare abundance within these potential source rocks, but their occurrence enables an independent comparison to pyrobitumen Eq. Ro values. Graptolites are another organic maceral that can be evaluated via organic petrology, but caution should be utilized since these tend to show a high degree of anisotropy. The results of this investigation provide additional geochemical guidance to assist geologists in more accurately interpreting thermal maturity in the Rome Trough region of the Appalachian Basin.

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American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Search and Discovery Article

Rock-Eval hydrogen index (HI) is often used to compare relative maturities of a source horizon across a basin. Usually, there are several measurements from the source horizon at a single well, and the mean hydrogen index is calculated, or the S2 is plotted against TOC. The slope of the best fit line through that data is used as the representative HI for that well (sometimes referred to as the ‘slope HI ’ methodology). There is a potential flaw in both these methodologies; however, that renders the calculated HI as misleading if the source horizon being examined is not relatively uniform in source quality, vertically in the stratigraphic column. From a geologic perspective, it would be unusual for the source rock quality not to vary vertically in the stratigraphic column. Organic matter input, preservation, dilution, and sediment accumulation rate typically vary in many depositional environments over the millions of years required to create a thick source rock package. Nevertheless, there are source rocks which do display remarkable source-quality uniformity from top to bottom of the stratigraphic package. We have examined source rocks from several basins where the source quality is relatively uniform over the stratigraphic column, and source rocks where the source quality varies greatly over the stratigraphic column. Methodologies to assess hydrogen index at specific wells for the se two scenarios differ. Most geoscientists may not be familiar with why a single technique is not suitable for both these scenarios, or how to correctly use hydrogen index as a relative maturation proxy in the case where source rock quality is not uniform. We will demonstrate how to determine if your source rock quality is uniform or varied relative to HI over the stratigraphic column, and how to assign a hydrogen index to the different source facies when that source rock quality is not uniform. Further we will illustrate how to estimate the original hydrogen index of the different source facies and assign each a transformation ratio. The transformation ratio is a better proxy for relative maturity, since different source facies may have different present-day hydrogen indices, but their present-day transformation ratio should be quite similar.

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American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Search and Discovery Article

The assessment of the natural temporal variability of source rock units is critical for the understanding of petroleum systems as changes in mineral matrix, organic matter (OM) concentration, and composition can significantly affect expulsion efficiency, primary and secondary migration processes, hydrocarbon quality as well as oil source rock correlation. Already small-scaled fluctuations within sediment successions can critically influence migration efficiency. High-resolution investigation of a well-preserved Lower Jurassic drill core (Toarcian Posidonia Shale) revealed seven discrete and systematic intervals of deviating source rock quality. These were composed of homogenized, non-laminated marls of light grey color, opposed to laminated dark grey background sedimentation. Both lithotypes differentiate not only in mineral composition, but particularly in OM content and quality. An average TOC content of app. 3.9 wt.% reached by the grey marl, is faced by an average TOC content of app. 7.8 wt.% measured for the laminated dark grey marls. Average hydrogen index for grey non-laminated marls was app. 550 mg HC/g TOC, whereas much higher source rock quality with 780 mg HC/g TOC was attained in the dark laminated marls. The marls lower OM concentration and inferior OM quality generates important domains for preferential migration of products, originated from the dark grey layers, or hydrocarbon cluster in case of limited migration into adjacent reservoirs. To assess the potential for preferential intake of hydrocarbons by the coarser-grained light marls and their qualification as migration avenues, artificial maturation experiments were performed with both lithotypes. Hydrocarbon generation was simulated by hydrous pyrolysis in two successive temperature steps 330 °C and 360 °C, covering an early maturity stage, as well as the end of the oil window. Both lithologies show striking differences, not only for the extract yield, but also for the timing of generation. OM quality differences were reflected by variable n-alkane distributions and molecular maturity parameters. High-resolution continuous data produced by non-destructive techniques allows to draw conclusions on i) source rock potential, ii) expulsion and migration processes , and iii) on prediction of petroleum accumulation within the sediment succession. High-resolution investigation in combination with artificial maturation experiments represent an easy-to-use tool in petroleum system analysis.

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American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Search and Discovery Article

The San Joaquin Basin lies west of the Sierra Nevada Mountains and east of the San Andre as Fault. Tens of kilometers of Mesozoic and Cenozoic sediments, including deep-water organic-rich source rocks, deposited in a forearc setting, comprise the basin and have contributed to a petroleum system that generates more than 70 percent of California 's daily oil production and includes three of the 10 largest oilfields in the United States. Based on a comprehensive 3D petroleum systems model of the San Joaquin basin, published by the USGS in 2008, we further refine the modeling to account for the unique depositional and tectonic history of the basin. Here, we compare various basal heat flow scenarios to model hydrocarbon generation and calibrate the results to available temperature and vitrinite reflectance (Vr) data. We investigate two types of crustal models: a McKenzie-type rift model, and a no-rift static crustal thickness model. Crustal stretching models calculate basal heat flow resulting from stretching/thinning of mantle and crust during initial (syn-rift) and thermal (post-rift) subsidence. This method uses rock matrix radiogenic heat production values. It does not account for transient effects resulting from burial and uplift of the basin fill. The static no-rift model, alternatively, calculates the basal heat flow based on a stable or non-thinning crust and mantle over time. This method uses estimated Uranium (U), Thorium (Th), and Potassium (K) concentrations within the rock material to then calculate the rock matrix heat production. Unlike the rift model, it accounts for the transient effects resulting from burial and uplift of the basin fill, which can have a considerable additional effect on the basal heat flow. Given the low probability of crustal stretching as the starting point for basal heat flow in the San Joaquin Basin and considering the forearc nature of the basin as well as the strong concentration of U, K, and Th in the Sierran granites, we focused on and refined the no-rift models. We manually account for the transitional nature of the San Joaquin basement from hot Sierran granite on the east to cool Franciscan oceanic rocks on the west. Radiogenic heat production from solely continental crust results in models that are too warm and cannot be calibrated to well temperature and Vr data. Solely oceanic models are too cool to match well data. ‘Combined crust’ incorporates a seismically derived suture zone that allows for a transition from oceanic to granitic basement, while the ‘intermediate crust’ mixes oceanic and continental radiogenic heat production. These models generate a good match to well data to the east and westward through the transition zone. Additionally, we are able to calibrate to wells off of the Belridge and Lost Hills structures. On structure wells, however, cannot be calibrated with a crustal conductive heat flow scenario and would require (local) elevated heat flows on the order of 20 mW/m 2. This is not in agreement with the generally cooler underlying oceanic crust and suggests that there might be a different and/or additional source of heat flow. Most likely, basin-scale hydrothermal groundwater flow, both along faults and up-structure, could account for elevated Vr and temperature. Convective heat flow would be an additional overprint or enhancement to conductive basal heat flow.

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American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Search and Discovery Article

The driving forces for conventional accumulations (structural or stratigraphic traps) are Forces of Buoyancy which are due to differences in densities of hydrocarbons and water. In contrast, the driving forces for unconventional tight accumulations are Forces of Expulsion which are produced by high pressures. That is an enormous difference and creates unconventional petroleum systems that are characterized by very different and distinctive characteristics. The Force of Expulsion pressures are created by the significant increase in volume when any of the three main kerogen types are converted to hydrocarbons. At those conversion times in the burial history, the rocks are already sufficiently tight so the large volumes of generated hydrocarbons cannot efficiently escape through the existing tight pore system, thus creating a permeability bottleneck that produces an overpressured compartment over a large area corresponding to the proper thermal oil and gas maturities for that basin. The forces initially created in these source rocks can only go limited distances into adjacent tight reservoirs (clastics or carbonates) above or below the source. The exact distance will vary depending on the pressure increase, matrix permeability, and fractures of that specific tight reservoir system. In general, the distances are small, in the orders of 10s to 100s of feet for oil and larger for more mobile gas systems. Those exact distance numbers are subject to ongoing investigations.   A plot of the pressure data versus elevation for a given formation is critical in determining whether an accumulation is conventional or unconventional. Conventional accumulations will have hydrocarbon columns of 10s to 100s of feet with the pressure in the hydrocarbons and that in the water equal at the bottom of the accumulation (at the HC-water contact). In contrast, the unconventional accumulations will show HC column heights of 1000s of feet with the pressure in the hydrocarbon phase and the water phase being the same at the top of the accumulation (at the updip transition zone). Those significant differences are critical for understanding and differentiating these two play types. Because the system is a pore throat bottleneck with very little or minimum lateral migration, the type of hydrocarbon s are closely tied to the thermal maturity required to generate those hydrocarbons. Thus the play concept begins with two important geochemical considerations: (1) where are the source rocks and what are the kerogen types and organic richness (TOC), and (2 ) where are they mature in the basin for oil, condensate, and gas in the basin. These parameters will very quickly define the fairway for the play. Then one has to add the critical information on the reservoirs themselves: composition (brittleness), thickness, and reservoir quality (matrix porosity and permeability). In summary, these tight unconventional petroleum systems (1) are dynamic , and (2) create a regionally inverted petroleum system with water over oil over condensate over gas for source rocks wit h Type I or II kerogen types.

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American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Learn! Blog

Welcome to an interview with the Panton Data Science Team, who are working in drone-based projects where they are pushing the envelope with respect to applications and accuracy, thanks to a unique approach to data collection and analytics.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Workshop
Calgary, Canada
Wednesday, 19 August 2020, 8:00 a.m.–4:00 p.m.

Machine Learning is an increasingly important tool for geoscientists. This one-day workshop demonstrates the implementation of a tailored End-to-End Upstream E & P workflow solution using Machine Learning (ML). It is intended for basic to intermediate skill levels. Designed to provide a baseline overview of ML, this hands-on workshop will focus on the generation of synthetic Gamma-Ray Logs by applying Artificial Intelligence (AI) Techniques. The student will learn the various aspects of deploying this workflow in an end-to-end solution. The workshop is designed to provide an appreciation of what is possible through machine learning and to spur thought about how this evolving tool can be otherwise applied.

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American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Short Course
Texas
Tuesday, 14 April Wednesday, 15 April 2020, 8:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m.

Software engineering is becoming a key skillset in the oil and gas industry. These skills are used to implement data science projects that increase production, lower costs, and improve safety. To boost the value of oil and gas practitioners, this course teaches software development in VBA for machine learning and the creation of a random forest tool in Excel. 

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Workshop
Perth, Australia
Wednesday, 17 March Thursday, 18 March 2021, 8:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m.

This workshop will focus on advances made in petroleum systems analysis as a predictor of hydrocarbon presence, new technology and applications, and future directions of this important geological tool.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Workshop
Lisbon, Portugal
Wednesday, 8 July Thursday, 9 July 2020, 8:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m.

This 2-day conference brings together diverse experts working on modern and ancient turbidite, MTDs, contourite and hybrid/mixed systems in order to improve the present-day knowledge, models and predictive power.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Workshop
Netherlands
Tuesday, 15 September Wednesday, 16 September 2020, 8:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m.

Join us for the AAPG Europe Workshop in Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) to be held in Utrecht, Netherlands on its new date, 15-16 September 2020. The aim of this conference is to explore how best to develop large scale geostorage of CO2.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Workshop
Barcelona, Spain
Tuesday, 24 November Wednesday, 25 November 2020, 8:00 p.m.–5:00 p.m.

This workshop brings together experts from academia and industry from a range of disciplines to share experiences, new approaches, new data and new ways of integrating information that can help in reducing the uncertainties related to the exploration activities in Thrust Belt Systems.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Workshop
Mozambique
Monday, 27 April Wednesday, 29 April 2020, 8:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m.

In 2020, AAPG will launch its first GTW (Geosciences Technology Workshop) in Mozambique, partnering with ENH (Mozambique National Oil and Gas Company) with a focus on deepwater reservoirs and LNG. The goal will be to build scientific knowledge, discover innovations, and network with peers. AAPG has established the GTWs as the primary vehicle for scientific and technological knowledge exchange throughout the world.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Short Course
Singapore
Thursday, 19 November 2020, 8:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

Jon Rotzien presents a 1-day course in Singapore on 21st Century Deep-water Clastic Reservoirs: Processes and Products.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Field Seminar
Houston, Texas
Tuesday, 2 June Friday, 5 June 2020, 11:00 a.m.–2:00 p.m.

A five day field trip held in conjunction with AAPG ACE 2020 in Houston, Texas, with visits to outcrops in Austin, Eagle Ford, Wolfcamp, and/or Bone Springs

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Workshop
Salzburg, Austria
Wednesday, 7 October Thursday, 8 October 2020, 8:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m.

Join us in Salzburg, the “castle of salt” and cradle of Mozart and Doppler, for a meeting aimed at bringing together different perspectives in the science of evaporite basins: from their formation to their deformation, from description and characterization to modelling. Exploratory success in evaporite-rich basins worldwide has depended on the role of evaporites as a deformable substrate, as a seal, or even as a good thermal conductor. The aim of this workshop is to improve our understanding and predictive ability by addressing evaporite systems in an integrated manner, all the way from precipitation to structuration, and exploring the multiple properties of evaporite sequences. The pre- and post-meeting field trips will also explore the salt mining heritage of the region, first exploited by the Celts 3500 years ago, and the salt-related structures of the Northern Calcareous Alps.

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American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Short Course
Houston, Texas
Thursday, 11 June Friday, 12 June 2020, 9:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m.

Deltas are extremely important depositional systems and often source and contain prolific hydrocarbon accumulations. This workshop includes topical lectures, key cores, and a suite of exercises that integrate core, well logs, experimental flume data, and seismic sections to develop identification and subsurface mapping skills of hydrocarbon accumulations within deltaic settings.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Short Course
Houston, Texas
Sunday, 7 June 2020, 8:30 a.m.–4:30 p.m.

This course provides an overview of different 3-D printing techniques that use both rock-like materials (e.g., sand, gypsum, clay) and polymers (e.g., plastics, resins). Participants will learn how to deploy 3-D-printed models to improve technical communication to diverse audiences (e.g., students, geoscientists, engineers, managers, community stakeholders).

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Short Course
Houston, Texas
Sunday, 7 June 2020, 8:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m.

The purpose of the course is to help people who are immersed in the oil and gas industry to gain a practical understanding of what unstructured data is, what value there is in it, how it can be utilized, and why this is now relevant.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Short Course
Houston, Texas
Saturday, 6 June Sunday, 7 June 2020, 8:30 a.m.–4:30 p.m.

A two-day course studying advanced methods in seismic stratigraphy including application of sequence stratigraphy to unconventional resources.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Short Course
Houston, Texas
Saturday, 6 June Sunday, 7 June 2020, 8:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m.

This course is designed to teach graduate students the principles, concepts and methods of sequence stratigraphy.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Short Course
Houston, Texas
Saturday, 6 June 2020, 9:00 a.m.–4:00 p.m.

Entry cost and CO2 supply have long been barriers to traditional Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) applications, but new tax regulations may break the stalemate, providing both for feasible EOR capture from a larger range of anthropogenic sources, and potential CCS options. The course will provide participants with an overview of CO2 in the framework of the energy transition. Speakers will address the regulatory and policy issues as well as societal concerns.

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American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Workshop
Barranquilla, Colombia
Tuesday, 27 October Wednesday, 28 October 2020, 8:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m.

The AAPG Latin America & Caribbean Region and the Colombian Association of Petroleum Geologists and Geophysicists (ACGGP) invite you join us for GTW Colombia 2020, a specialized workshop bringing leading scientists and industry practitioners to share best practices, exchange ideas and explore opportunities for future collaboration. The 2-day workshop brings together technical experts and industry leaders from Colombia and throughout the Americas to take a multidisciplinary look at future opportunities for exploration and development of Southern Caribbean Frontier Basins.

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American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Field Seminar
Ipoh, Malaysia
Sunday, 8 November 2020, 9:00 a.m.–10:00 a.m.

Date: Sunday 8 November 2020 Time: To be determined View Information On CO2 Laboratory Further details to come.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Workshop
Ipoh, Malaysia
Thursday, 5 November Saturday, 7 November 2020, 8:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m.

High CO2 fields and marginal fields (due to high levels of contaminants) are some of the challenges that are prevalent in the Asia Pacific petroleum industry. Join AAPG Asia Pacific for a 2-day workshop focused on best practices, risk-based planning and the role geoscientists and engineers will play in these changing times.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Field Seminar
Ipoh, Malaysia
Sunday, 8 November 2020, 8:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

Date: Sunday 8 November 2020 Time: To be determined Organized by: Southeast Asia Carbonate Research Laboratory, SEACARL, The Department of Geosciences, Faculty Fundamental Sciences, Information system Technology, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS. While AAPG and EAGE welcome this Field Trip in conjunction with our 2-day Geosciences Technology Workshop, all management and attending responsibilities will be taken care of by Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS. View Flyer Further details to come.

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American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Workshop
Al-Khobar, Saudi Arabia
Monday, 26 October Wednesday, 28 October 2020, 8:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m.

Join us for the 3rd Edition of Stratigraphic Traps of the Middle East. The Geosciences Technology Workshop (GTW) aims to build on the success of the previous two workshops the AAPG hosted on stratigraphic traps of the Middle East GTW in Muscat Oman in 2014 and 2017. See Event Website

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
VG Abstract

The following short course option was developed for geology and geophysics students that have not had much exposure to how geoscience is applied in industry. It can be tailored for undergraduate juniors and seniors or graduate students. The agenda can be modified to meet specific needs and time constraints. Contact the presenter to discuss options.

Request a visit from Fred Schroeder!

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
VG Abstract

Hydraulic fracturing has been around for decades. This talk describes some of the first applications of the technology, how it developed over time, and our current understanding of its impacts with some discussion of both water and earthquake hazards.

Request a visit from Sherilyn Williams-Stroud!

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
VG Abstract

This is a less-technical education topic. It can be condensed to an hour or given as 2 two-hour sessions. It stresses selected controversial aspects of fracking that touch some combination of environment and economics and includes a short video of how fracking is done.

Request a visit from David Weinberg!

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
VG Abstract

The carbonate sequences that were deposited in the now exhumed Tethyan Ocean influence many aspects of our lives today, either by supplying the energy that warms our homes and the fuel that powers our cars or providing the stunning landscapes for both winter and summer vacations. They also represent some of the most intensely studied rock formations in the world and have provided geoscientists with a fascinating insight into the turbulent nature of 250 Million years of Earth’s history. By combining studies from the full range of geoscience disciplines this presentation will trace the development of these carbonate sequences from their initial formation on the margins of large ancient continental masses to their present day locations in and around the Greater Mediterranean and Near East region. The first order control on growth patterns and carbonate platform development by the regional plate-tectonic setting, underlying basin architecture and fluctuations in sea level will be illustrated. The organisms that contribute to sequence development will be revealed to be treasure troves of forensic information. Finally, these rock sequences will be shown to contain all the ingredients necessary to form and retain hydrocarbons and the manner in which major post-depositional tectonic events led to the formation of some of the largest hydrocarbon accumulations in the world will be demonstrated.

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Request a visit from Keith Gerdes!

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
VG Abstract

The following short course option was developed for geology and geophysics students that have not had much exposure to how geoscience is applied in industry. It can be tailored for undergraduate juniors and seniors or graduate students. The agenda can be modified to meet specific needs and time constraints.

Request a visit from Fred Schroeder!

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
VG Abstract

This lecture will discuss the differences between carbonates and siliciclastics from their chemical composition through their distributions in time and space. Building on these fundamental differences, we will explore the challenges carbonates pose to petroleum geologists in terms of seismic interpretation, reservoir quality prediction, field development, etc. Peppered with humorous personal stories, still raging academic debates, and the heartfelt frustrations of real industry professionals, the aim is to inspire students and young professionals to rise to the occasion and embrace the reservoir rocks that petroleum geologists love to hate.

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Request a visit from Noelle Joy Purcell!

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
VG Abstract

The following short course option was developed for geology and geophysics students that have not had much exposure to how geoscience is applied in industry. It can be tailored for undergraduate juniors and seniors or graduate students. The agenda can be modified to meet specific needs and time constraints. Contact the presenter to discuss options.

Request a visit from Fred Schroeder!

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
VG Abstract

The following short course option was developed for geology and geophysics students that have not had much exposure to how geoscience is applied in industry. It can be tailored for undergraduate juniors and seniors or graduate students. The agenda can be modified to meet specific needs and time constraints. Contact the presenter to discuss options.

Request a visit from Fred Schroeder!

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
VG Abstract

The Betic hinterland, in the westernmost Mediterranean, constitutes a unique example of a stack of metamorphic units. Using a three-dimensional model for the crustal structure of the Betics-Rif area this talk will address the role of crustal flow simultaneously to upper-crustal low-angle faulting in the origin and evolution of the topography.

Request a visit from Juan I. Soto!

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
VG Abstract

Analysis of microseismicity induced by hydraulic fracture stimulation in the Marcellus Shale shows changes in stress state for different zones of failure. During the treatment, shear failure occurs on both the J1 and J2 fracture orientations in response to different maximum stress orientations, indicating localized changes in the orientation during the treatment. Reactivation of a fault near the wellbore is associated with failure mechanisms with a higher volumetric component, indicating possible inflation of faults and fractures by the introduction of the slurry. Quantification of the stress conditions that are associated with inflation could potentially be used to optimize the stimulation by identifying which fractures will preferentially take on slurry volume.

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Request a visit from Sherilyn Williams-Stroud!

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)

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