wwwUpdate Blog

A new website, changes to the Bylaws, Student and Educational Support and the list of new Eastern Section Officers and more. A report from Drew Waggener, Eastern Section AAPG President.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Explorer Foundation Update

It has a new name, a new energy and a new lineup of experts, all primed to spread geoscience knowledge around the world. “It” is AAPG’s newly named Global Distinguished Lecture Program – emphasis on the “global” – which dates back to 1941 but continues to be the Association’s flagship initiative for offering the latest in geologic science to AAPG affiliated geological societies and universities.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Explorer Article

February proves itself the busiest month of the year for AAPG’s Distinguished Lecture program, with seven speakers – five domestic and two international – set to be on speaking tours. The tours involve stops at 40 cities in North America and at least 12 stops throughout Europe and Asia. Some tours continue into early March.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Explorer Policy Watch

We enjoyed working with Governmental Affairs Committee Chair (GAC) Carl J. Smith and DPA President Tom Ewing this year at the AAPG booth in the National Conference of State Legislators (NCSL), hosted by Massachusetts in Boston.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Explorer Regions and Sections

The AAPG Eastern Section was founded in 1977 in Washington, D.C., by a council of AAPG associated societies. The Section has been active ever since, holding society-hosted annual meetings at locales throughout the Section and eastern Canada. The Section currently is home to 2,209 AAPG members (1,039 Active, 695 Associate, 298 Student, 163 Emeritus, 11 Honorary and three Life members).

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Explorer Article

What would compel a geologist to give up a well-earned university sabbatical or dust off a rock hammer and come out of retirement to spend three months alone mapping the geology of some of America's most remote and rugged national parks and national forests?

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Online e-Symposium
Thursday, 12 July 2012, 12:00 a.m.–12:00 a.m.

This presentation will look at well placement vertically in the pay, well azimuth and well trajectory with explanations of how geology and post-depositional effects can make the difference between a successful well and a failure.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Online e-Symposium
Thursday, 3 June 2010, 12:00 a.m.–12:00 a.m.

Upon successful completion of this course, you will be able to describe faults and fractures in carbonates, black shales, and coarser clastics as they occur in the northern Appalachian Basin.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Online e-Symposium
Thursday, 20 August 2009, 12:00 a.m.–12:00 a.m.

This e-symposium covers advances in geothermal energy, integration with petroleum operations, and lessons learned in recent cases.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Online e-Symposium
Thursday, 9 February 2012, 12:00 a.m.–12:00 a.m.

Projects in several shales will be discussed, including Marcellus, Eagle Ford, Haynesville, Fayetteville, Montney, and Barnett, as will several seismically-detectable drivers for success including lithofacies, stress, pre-existing fractures, and pore pressure.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Online e-Symposium
Thursday, 28 July 2011, 12:00 a.m.–12:00 a.m.

This presentation discusses one operator’s approach to fully integrate data captured in the Marcellus Shale in order to optimize horizontal well performance.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
VG Abstract

This lecture will discuss the differences between carbonates and siliciclastics from their chemical composition through their distributions in time and space. Building on these fundamental differences, we will explore the challenges carbonates pose to petroleum geologists in terms of seismic interpretation, reservoir quality prediction, field development, etc. Peppered with humorous personal stories, still raging academic debates, and the heartfelt frustrations of real industry professionals, the aim is to inspire students and young professionals to rise to the occasion and embrace the reservoir rocks that petroleum geologists love to hate.

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American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)

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