Explorer Geophysical Corner

One of the first questions a seismic interpreter must ask is how to recognize and characterize the reservoir. Understanding the geology and the depositional history of the area is a good start.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Explorer Article

If the recent evidence of an uptick in acquisitions and divestiture activities continues, the next APPEX Global event in London should coincide with many new international prospects in the first quarter of 2018.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Explorer Article

Commercial space exploration is on the rise, and they need astronauts with the right stuff — geoscience expertise.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Middle East Blog

Registration for 2018 GEO Conference and Exhibition is now open! Don’t miss out on the early bird rate and register before 5 February 2018.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Explorer Geophysical Corner

Curvature has long been used by geologists to predict the density of natural fractures from outcrop. Sand box experiments show that correlations between curvature and strain can be significant, which is supportive of the curvature-strain-natural fractures supposition inherent in the use of curvature to predict natural fractures.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Explorer President’s Column

This month, AAPG will hold our International Conference and Exhibition ICE in London. The theme of the event is “100 Years of Science Fueled by 100 Years of Prosperity.”

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Middle East Blog

Submit your abstract by 26 October to participate in this fourth AAPG/EAGE workshop focusing on the experiences gained in exploring and developing tight reservoirs in the Middle East across the different disciplines.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Explorer Geophysical Corner

In this article, we demonstrate the identification of organically rich sweet spots within the Point Pleasant interval using 3-D seismic data, the available well and core data.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Explorer Director’s Corner

Just days ago we, here in North America, experienced a full solar eclipse. As daylight turned to twilight in midday, outside temperatures fell, and we witnessed one of the grandest celestial dances as the moon slipped between Earth and sun. Awe and wonder is a natural and human response to such an event.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Explorer President’s Column

Helping all our members add to the global energy supply is AAPG’s prime goal and will be for a very long time. Research shows that we have underestimated petroleum systems. Combine that with our ever-improving ability to extract energy sources from nano-scale spaces, and we have an energy revolution.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
DL Abstract

Physics is an essential component of geophysics but there is much that physics cannot know or address. 

Request a visit from John Castagna!

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
DL Abstract

Three-dimensional (3D) seismic-reflection surveys provide one of the most important data types for understanding subsurface depositional systems. Quantitative analysis is commonly restricted to geophysical interpretation of elastic properties of rocks in the subsurface. Wide availability of 3D seismic-reflection data and integration provide opportunities for quantitative analysis of subsurface stratigraphic sequences. Here, we integrate traditional seismic-stratigraphic interpretation with quantitative geomorphologic analysis and numerical modeling to explore new insights into submarine-channel evolution.

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Request a visit from Jacob Covault!

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
DL Abstract

Around 170 million years ago, the Gulf of Mexico basin flooded catastrophically, and the pre-existing landscape, which had been a very rugged, arid, semi-desert world, was drowned beneath an inland sea of salt water. The drowned landscape was then buried under kilometers of salt, perfectly preserving the older topography. Now, with high-quality 3D seismic data, the salt appears as a transparent layer, and the details of the drowned world can be seen in exquisite detail, providing a unique snapshot of the world on the eve of the flooding event. We can map out hills and valleys, and a system of river gullies and a large, meandering river system. These rivers in turn fed into a deep central lake, whose surface was about 750m below global sea level. This new knowledge also reveals how the Louann Salt was deposited. In contrast to published models, the salt was deposited in a deep water, hypersaline sea. We can estimate the rate of deposition, and it was very fast; we believe that the entire thickness of several kilometers of salt was laid down in a few tens of thousands of years, making it possibly the fastest sustained deposition seen so far in the geological record.

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Request a visit from Frank Peel!

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
VG Abstract

In comparison with the known boundary conditions that promote salt deformation and flow in sedimentary basins, the processes involved with the mobilization of clay-rich detrital sediments are far less well established. This talk will use seismic examples in different tectonic settings to document the variety of shale geometries that can be formed under brittle and ductile deformations.

Request a visit from Juan I. Soto!

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)

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