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Assets within the Appalachian Basin range from conventional clastic and carbonate reservoirs to source rocks of Devonian black shale and Pennsylvanian coal, all of which are fractured.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Desktop /Portals/0/images/_site/AAPG-newlogo-vertical-morepadding.jpg?width=100&h=100&mode=crop&anchor=middlecenter&quality=75amp;encoder=freeimage&progressive=true Tectonic History of the Marcellus Gas Shale as Revealed by Fracturing in the Appalachian Mountain Foreland
 

The Gulf of Mexico (GOM) is the 9th largest body of water on earth, covering an area of approximately 1.6 million km2 with water depths reaching 4,400 m (14,300’). The basin formed as a result of crustal extension during the early Mesozoic breakup of Pangaea. Rifting occurred from the Late Triassic to early Middle Jurassic. Continued extension through the Middle Jurassic combined with counter-clockwise rotation of crustal blocks away from North America produced highly extended continental crust in the subsiding basin center. Subsidence eventually allowed oceanic water to enter from the west leading to thick, widespread, evaporite deposition. Seafloor spreading initiated in the Late Jurassic eventually splitting the evaporite deposits into northern (USA) and southern (Mexican) basins. Recent work suggests that this may have been accomplished by asymmetric extension, crustal delamination, and exposure of the lower crust or upper mantle rather than true sea floor spreading (or it could be some combination of the two). By 135 Ma almost all extension had ceased and the basic configuration of the GOM basin seen today was established. The Laramide Orogeny was the last major tectonic event impacting the GOM. It caused uplift and erosion for the NW margin from the Late Cretaceous to early Eocene.

Show more American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Desktop /Portals/0/images/_site/AAPG-newlogo-vertical-morepadding.jpg?width=100&h=100&mode=crop&anchor=middlecenter&quality=75amp;encoder=freeimage&progressive=true A Brief Tectonic and Depositional History of the Northern Gulf of Mexico
 

Offshore Angola has to date delivered recoverable reserves in excess of 20 billion barrels of oil equivalent. This has been encountered in two distinct play systems: the Upper Cretaceous Pinda carbonates sourced by Lower Creatceous lacustrine mudstones and Tertiary deepwater slope turbidite sands sourced by underlying Upper Cretaceous marine mudstones. An extension of the Girassol play into Block 18 to the south will be used to describe how high quality 3D seismic data coupled with a detailed analysis of rock properties led to an unprecedented 6 successes out of 6 wells in the block, including the giant Plutonio discovery. Industry is turning once more to the carbonate play potential - this time in deepwater. It would seem that the Angola offshore success story is set to continue for some time to come.

Show more American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Desktop /Portals/0/images/_site/AAPG-newlogo-vertical-morepadding.jpg?width=100&h=100&mode=crop&anchor=middlecenter&quality=75amp;encoder=freeimage&progressive=true Oil Exploration Offshore Angola: Past, Present & Future
 

Some things are worth waiting for: The potential of the Tuscaloosa Marine Shale has the E&P industry chomping at the bit, awaiting the seven billion barrels of oil estimated for recovery.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Desktop /Portals/0/PackFlashItemImages/WebReady/geologists-excited-about-tms-potential-2013-07july-hero.jpg?width=100&h=100&mode=crop&anchor=middlecenter&quality=75amp;encoder=freeimage&progressive=true Once overlooked, now spotlight-grabbing Geologists Excited About TMS Potential
 

West Edmond field, located in central Oklahoma, is one of the largest oil accumulations in the Silurian–Devonian Hunton Group in this part of the Anadarko Basin. Production from all stratigraphic units in the field exceeds 170 million barrels of oil (MMBO) and 400 billion cubic feet of gas (BCFG), of which approximately 60 MMBO and 100 BCFG have been produced from the Hunton Group. Oil and gas are stratigraphically trapped to the east against the Nemaha uplift, to the north by a regional wedge-out of Hunton strata, and by intraformational diagenetic traps. Hunton Group reservoirs are the Bois d'Arc and Frisco Limestones, with lesser production from the Chimneyhill subgroup, Haragan Shale, and Henryhouse Formation.

Hunton Group cores from three wells that were examined petrographically indicate that complex diagenetic relations influence permeability and reservoir quality. Greatest porosity and permeability are associated with secondary dissolution in packstones and grainstones, forming hydrocarbon reservoirs. The overlying Devonian–Mississippian Woodford Shale is the major petroleum source rock for the Hunton Group in the field, based on one-dimensional and four-dimensional petroleum system models that were calibrated to well temperature and Woodford Shale vitrinite reflectance data. The source rock is marginally mature to mature for oil generation in the area of the West Edmond field, and migration of Woodford oil and gas from deeper parts of the basin also contributed to hydrocarbon accumulation.

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Desktop /Portals/0/PackFlashItemImages/WebReady/Bulletin-hero-2013-07jul.jpg?width=100&h=100&mode=crop&anchor=middlecenter&quality=75amp;encoder=freeimage&progressive=true Petroleum system analysis of the Hunton Group in West Edmond field, Oklahoma
 
Jurassic deposition in the Maghrebian tethys was governed by eustasy and rifting. Two periods were delineated: (1) a carbonate shelf (Rhaetian–early Pliensbachian) and (2) a platform-basin complex (early Pliensbachian–Callovian). The carbonate shelf evolved in four stages, generating three sedimentary sequences, J1 to J3, separated by boundary sea level falls, drawdown, exposure, and local erosion. Sediment facies bear evidence of sea level rises and falls. Lateral changes in lithofacies indicate shoaling and deepening upward during the Sinemurian. A major pulse of rifting with an abrupt transition from carbonate shelf to pelagic basin environments of deposition marks the upper boundary of the lower Pliensbachian carbonate shelf deposits. This rifting episode with brittle fractures broke up the Rhaetian–early Pliensbachian carbonate shelf and has created a network of grabens, half grabens, horsts, and stacked ramps. Following this episode, a relative sea level rise led to pelagic sedimentation in the rift basins with local anoxic environments that also received debris shed from uplifted ramp crests. Another major episode spanning the whole early Pliensbachian–Bajocian is suggested by early brecciation, mass flows, slumps, olistolites, erosion, pinch-outs, and sedimentary prisms. A later increase in the rates of drifting marked a progress toward rift cessation during the Late Jurassic. These Jurassic carbonates with detrital deposits and black shales as the source rocks in northeastern Tunisia may define interesting petroleum plays (pinch-out flanking ramps, onlaps, and structurally upraised blocks sealed inside grabens). Source rock maturation and hydrocarbon migration began early in the Cretaceous and reached a maximum during the late Tortonian–Pliocene Atlassic orogeny.
Show more American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Desktop /Portals/0/PackFlashItemImages/WebReady/a-transition-from-carbonate-shelf-to-pelagic.jpg?width=100&h=100&mode=crop&anchor=middlecenter&quality=75amp;encoder=freeimage&progressive=true A transition from carbonate shelf to pelagic basin environments of deposition: Rifting and depositional systems in the Jurassic of northeastern Tunisia
 

A three-dimensional seismic data set and published data from exploration wells were used to reconstruct the tectonostratigraphic evolution of the Mandal High area, southern North Sea, Norway. The Mandal High is an elongated southeast-northwest–trending horst. Three fault families in the Lower Permian sequence, inherited from the basement structural grain of Caledonian origin, are interpreted: (1) a north-northwest–south-southeast–striking fault family, (2) a northeast-southwest–striking fault family, and (3) a near east-west–striking fault family. In addition, an east-southeast–west-northwest–striking fault family (4) that formed during Late Jurassic rifting and was reverse reactivated in the Late Cretaceous is interpreted. We suggest that inversion occurred because of small dextral motion along fault family 1. A final fault family (5) displays various strike orientations and is associated with salt movements.

Seven chronostratigraphic sequences defined by well data and recognized on three-dimensional seismic data are interpreted and mapped: Early Permian rifting in a continental environment; Late Permian deposition of the Zechstein salt and flooding; Triassic continental rifting; uplift and erosion in the Middle Jurassic with deposition of shallow-marine and deltaic sediments; rifting and transgression in a deep-marine environment during the Late Jurassic; a post-rift phase in a marine environment during the Early Cretaceous; and flooding and deposition of the Chalk Group in the Late Cretaceous. An eighth sequence was interpreted—Paleogene–Neogene—but has not been studied in detail. This sequence is dominated by progradation from the east and basin subsidence. Well and seismic data over the Mandal High reveal that large parts of the high were subaerially exposed from Late Permian to Late Jurassic or Early Cretaceous, providing a local source of sediments for adjacent basins.

Similar to the Utsira High, where several large hydrocarbon discoveries have been recently seen, the Mandal High might consist of a set of petroleum plays, including fractured crystalline basement and shallow-marine systems along the flanks of the high, thereby opening up future exploration opportunities.

Show more American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Desktop /Portals/0/PackFlashItemImages/WebReady/permian-holocene-tectonostratigraphic-evolution-Mandal-High.jpg?width=100&h=100&mode=crop&anchor=middlecenter&quality=75amp;encoder=freeimage&progressive=true Permian–Holocene tectonostratigraphic evolution of the Mandal High, Central Graben, North Sea
 

Industry and academia are teaming up to pump up activity in the Mississippian of the Midcontinent United States.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Desktop /Portals/0/PackFlashItemImages/WebReady/osu-industry-consortium-eyes-mississippian-2013-03mar-hero.jpg?width=100&h=100&mode=crop&anchor=middlecenter&quality=75amp;encoder=freeimage&progressive=true A ‘huge’ Mid-Continent resource OSU-Industry Consortium Eyes Mississippian
 

The central Black Sea Basin of Turkey is filled by more than 9 km (6 mi) of Upper Triassic to Holocene sedimentary and volcanic rocks. The basin has a complex history, having evolved from a rift basin to an arc basin and finally having become a retroarc foreland basin. The Upper Triassic–Lower Jurassic Akgol and Lower Cretaceous Cağlayan Formations have a poor to good hydrocarbon source rock potential, and the middle Eocene Kusuri Formation has a limited hydrocarbon source rock potential. The basin has oil and gas seeps. Many large structures associated with extensional and compressional tectonics, which could be traps for hydrocarbon accumulations, exist.

Fifteen onshore and three offshore exploration wells were drilled in the central Black Sea Basin, but none of them had commercial quantities of hydrocarbons. The assessment of these drilling results suggests that many wells were drilled near the Ekinveren, Erikli, and Ballıfakı thrusts, where structures are complex and oil and gas seeps are common. Many wells were not drilled deep enough to test the potential carbonate and clastic reservoirs of the İnaltı and Cağlayan Formations because these intervals are locally buried by as much as 5 km (3 mi) of sedimentary and volcanic rocks. No wells have tested prospective structures in the north and east where the prospective İnalti and Cağlayan Formations are not as deeply buried. Untested hydrocarbons may exist in this area.

Show more American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Desktop /Portals/0/PackFlashItemImages/WebReady/new-evidences-for-the-formation-turkey.jpg?width=100&h=100&mode=crop&anchor=middlecenter&quality=75amp;encoder=freeimage&progressive=true New evidences for the formation of and for petroleum exploration in the fold-thrust zones of the central Black Sea Basin of Turkey
 

It don’t come easy: The oil rich Monterey Shale has proved to be the biggest conventional resource provider in California, and it promises even more – but the formation’s complex geology is just as intimidating as its potential is huge.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Desktop /Portals/0/PackFlashItemImages/WebReady/monterey-shale-continues-to-tempt-and-tease-2013-02feb-hero.jpg?width=100&h=100&mode=crop&anchor=middlecenter&quality=75amp;encoder=freeimage&progressive=true California play full of complexities Monterey Shale Continues to Tempt and Tease
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In-Person Training
Jabal Akhdar Ad Dakhiliyah Oman 12 December, 2019 12 December, 2019 52552 Desktop /Portals/0/PackFlashItemImages/WebReady/Jabal-Akhdar-hero.jpg?width=100&height=100&mode=crop&anchor=middlecenter&quality=75amp;encoder=freeimage&progressive=true Basin Modeling and Geochemistry, Source Rock
 
Jabal Akhdar, Ad Dakhiliyah, Oman
12 December 2019

Field Trip Leader: Andreas Scharf, Sultan Qaboos University (SQU)
Date: 12th December
Time: 7.30am – 7pm
Fee: $400
Registration for the field trip is now closed

The Jabal Akhdar in the Oman Mountains forms a ~90 km x 60 km large dome. The core of this dome consists of Precambrian sedimentary rocks, including source rocks. These rocks are separated by the overlying rocks by an angular unconformity. Rocks above this unconformity are the Permo-Mesozoic shelf carbonates of the Arabian passive margin. During the Late Cretaceous, the Arabian shelf was overthrust by the Semail Ophiolite and Hawasina rocks. Final doming was during the Eocene to Miocene. Thus, the Jabal Akhdar Dome provides insights to several deformation events.

This field trip will start near Al-Hamra and traverse the Jabal Akhdar Dome from the southern margin. Our road leads to a spectacular vista point at about 2000 m elevation. From this site we will study the regional folds in Precambrian formations as well the impressive cliffs of Permo-Mesozoic rocks. Within the core of the dome we will investigate Paleozoic refolded folds as well as syndepositional extensional faults within the Precambrian strata (Figs. 1 & 2). In Wadi Bani Kharous, the angular unconformity is superbly exposed (Fig. 3). The field trip will further inspect ductile and brittle deformation in the Mesozoic shelf carbonates (Fig. 4). Deformation is due to gravitational collapse and related extension immediately after ophiolite emplacement and final doming.

Beirut Lebanon 13 December, 2019 13 December, 2019 54404 Desktop /Portals/0/PackFlashItemImages/WebReady/ft-central-coastal-Lebanon-hero.jpg?width=100&height=100&mode=crop&anchor=middlecenter&quality=75amp;encoder=freeimage&progressive=true Member, Carbonates, Sedimentology and Stratigraphy, Carbonate Platforms, Basin Modeling and Geochemistry, Source Rock, Structure, Structural Analysis (Other)
 
Beirut, Lebanon
13 December 2019

Date: Friday December 13, 2019
Location: Central coastal Lebanon north of Beirut. The visited towns will include Qartaba, Laqlouq, Tannourine, Chekka and Byblos
Fees: US$ 550 (Members) | US$ 750 (Non-members)

Trip Objectives:

Investigate the Cretaceous to Miocene carbonate platforms in Lebanon to draw analogy to Zohr, Explore the depositional environment of the Campanian source rocks, visualise the large structures of the Levant margin (e.g. the Qartaba structure) analogous to the offshore structures and have a concept of the scale.

Itinerary:

Departure time: 8:00 AM from hotel

Stop 1: Qartaba village: Overview of the stratigraphy and depositional environment of the Levant margin by looking at a panoramic view of the stratigraphic succession.

Stop 2: Laqlouq: quick stop to visualize the folding of the Qartaba anticline

Stop 3: Tannourine: Overview of the large E-W strike-slip faults and discussion on their geodynamic history and implications on the petroleum system

Stop 4: Tannourine-Douma road: Overview of the Cretaceous carbonate monocline and discussion on facies variation

Stop 5: Chekka quarry: Examine the Campanian thermogenic source rocks and the Paleocene depositional systems.

Stop 6: Ras Chekka: observe the Eocene carbonates, the Miocene reefs and the hiatus between the Lutetian-Burdigalian

End of the trip by 5:00 PM

Figure 1: The map of the region visited in this fieldtrip

Figure 1: The map of the region visited in this fieldtrip

Figure 2: Map showing the road that will be followed during the trip and the location of the stops
Figure 2: Map showing the road that will be followed during the trip and the location of the stops
Barranquilla Atlántico Colombia 26 March, 2020 27 March, 2020 54605 Desktop /Portals/0/PackFlashItemImages/WebReady/gtw-lacr-exploration-development-in-southern-caribbean-hero.jpg?width=100&height=100&mode=crop&anchor=middlecenter&quality=75amp;encoder=freeimage&progressive=true Business and Economics, Risk Analysis, Basin Modeling and Geochemistry, Basin Modeling, Maturation, Migration, Oil and Gas Analysis, Oil Seeps, Petroleum Systems, Source Rock, Thermal History, Geophysics, Seismic, Magnetic, Gravity, Direct Hydrocarbon Indicators, Petrophysics and Well Logs, Clastics, Sedimentology and Stratigraphy, Conventional Sandstones, Deep Sea / Deepwater, Deepwater Turbidites, Eolian Sandstones, Fluvial Deltaic Systems, High Stand Deposits, Incised Valley Deposits, Marine, Regressive Deposits, Sheet Sand Deposits, Shelf Sand Deposits, Slope, Transgressive Deposits, Sequence Stratigraphy, Structure, Structural Analysis (Other), Tectonics (General), Geomechanics and Fracture Analysis, Fold and Thrust Belts, Compressional Systems, Structural Traps, Deep Basin Gas, Tight Gas Sands, Stratigraphic Traps, Member
 
Barranquilla, Atlántico, Colombia
26-27 March 2020

The AAPG Latin America & Caribbean Region and the Colombian Association of Petroleum Geologists and Geophysicists (ACGGP) invite you join us for GTW Colombia 2020, a specialized workshop bringing leading scientists and industry practitioners to share best practices, exchange ideas and explore opportunities for future collaboration.

The 2-day workshop brings together technical experts and industry leaders from Colombia and throughout the Americas to take a multidisciplinary look at future opportunities for exploration and development of Southern Caribbean Frontier Basins.

Online Training
23 April, 2015 23 April, 2015 16809 Desktop /Portals/0/PackFlashItemImages/WebReady/an-analytical-model-for-shale-gas-permeability-hero.jpg?width=100&height=100&mode=crop&anchor=middlecenter&quality=75amp;encoder=freeimage&progressive=true
 
23 April 2015
Recent laboratory studies have revealed previously unknown behaviors in shale gas which unlock secrets of permeability and sweet spots in shale gas reservoirs. The presentation presents the findings and also goes into detail about how the new information can be applied in order to potentially improve recovery in reservoirs.
02 December, 2014 02 December, 2014 11967 Desktop /Portals/0/PackFlashItemImages/WebReady/esymp-multiscale-modeling-of-gas-transport-hero.jpg?width=100&height=100&mode=crop&anchor=middlecenter&quality=75amp;encoder=freeimage&progressive=true
 
2 December 2014

The gas transport in organic-rich shales involves different length-scales, from organic and inorganic pores to macro- and macrofractures. In order to upscale the fluid transport from nanoscale (flow through nanopores) to larger scales (to micro- and macrofractures), multicontinuum methodology is planned to be used.

30 October, 2014 30 October, 2014 11390 Desktop /Portals/0/PackFlashItemImages/WebReady/sc-kerogen-maturity-determinations.jpg?width=100&height=100&mode=crop&anchor=middlecenter&quality=75amp;encoder=freeimage&progressive=true
 
30 October 2014

Cross disciplinary workflows play an important part of successful characterization of shale reservoirs. This course discusses how the artificial kerogen maturity of organic-rich Green River shale affects the petrophysical, micro-structural, geochemical and elastic properties.

28 April, 2011 28 April, 2011 1471 Desktop /Portals/0/PackFlashItemImages/WebReady/oc-es-niobrara-petroleum-system-a-major-tight-resource-play.jpg?width=100&height=100&mode=crop&anchor=middlecenter&quality=75amp;encoder=freeimage&progressive=true
 
28 April 2011

The Niobrara Petroleum System of the U.S. Rocky Mountain Region is a major tight petroleum resource play.

09 December, 2010 09 December, 2010 1466 Desktop /Portals/0/PackFlashItemImages/WebReady/oc-es-bakken-petroleum-system-of-the-williston-basin.jpg?width=100&height=100&mode=crop&anchor=middlecenter&quality=75amp;encoder=freeimage&progressive=true
 
9 December 2010

The Mississippian-Devonian Bakken Petroleum System of the Williston Basin is characterized by low-porosity and permeability reservoirs, organic-rich source rocks, and regional hydrocarbon charge.

11 November, 2010 11 November, 2010 1465 Desktop /Portals/0/PackFlashItemImages/WebReady/oc-es-geochemical-evaluation-of-eagle-ford-group-source.jpg?width=100&height=100&mode=crop&anchor=middlecenter&quality=75amp;encoder=freeimage&progressive=true
 
11 November 2010

This e-symposium is ideal for geologists, geophysicists, engineers and other geoscientists who are involved in gas shale exploration and production.

14 February, 3000 14 February, 3000 7817 Desktop /Portals/0/PackFlashItemImages/WebReady/oc-es-generic-hero.jpg?width=100&height=100&mode=crop&anchor=middlecenter&quality=75amp;encoder=freeimage&progressive=true
 
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