Explorer Article

Online Registration closes SEPTEMBER 23

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Explorer Article

Speakers are now picked and preparing for this year's AAPG Distinguished Lecture slate of talks, both in the United States and around the world.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Explorer Emphasis Article

Continued success in the deepwater Gulf of Mexico especially involving the subsalt plays — may depend on how geologists 'see' the situation.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Explorer Emphasis Article

Ninety-nine percent of total Gulf of Mexico production is from Neogene-age reservoirs

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Explorer Emphasis Article

Now, this is deep: A new MMS report officially establishes the deepwater regions as the big gorilla in the Gulf of Mexico.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Explorer Geophysical Corner

Last month's article on 'Understanding Seismic Amplitudes' listed 21 factors that could affect seismic amplitudes through seismic acquisition and the earth. This article presents 14 additional factors that arise in seismic processing and interpretation.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Explorer Article

The upcoming APPEX event in Houston is set to draw numerous repeat customers beckoned by the show's theme to 'Discover More in 2004.'

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Explorer Emphasis Article

When once-rampant drilling activity in a region begins declining and the majors begin losing interest, 'it's all drilled up' becomes the common refrain.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Explorer Emphasis Article

North Sea independents — small and otherwise — continue to find success.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Explorer Geophysical Corner

Seismic interpretation is fundamentally based on interpreting changes in amplitude.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
DL Abstract

Three-dimensional (3D) seismic-reflection surveys provide one of the most important data types for understanding subsurface depositional systems. Quantitative analysis is commonly restricted to geophysical interpretation of elastic properties of rocks in the subsurface. Wide availability of 3D seismic-reflection data and integration provide opportunities for quantitative analysis of subsurface stratigraphic sequences. Here, we integrate traditional seismic-stratigraphic interpretation with quantitative geomorphologic analysis and numerical modeling to explore new insights into submarine-channel evolution.

Show more

Request a visit from Jacob Covault!

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
VG Abstract

In comparison with the known boundary conditions that promote salt deformation and flow in sedimentary basins, the processes involved with the mobilization of clay-rich detrital sediments are far less well established. This talk will use seismic examples in different tectonic settings to document the variety of shale geometries that can be formed under brittle and ductile deformations.

Request a visit from Juan I. Soto!

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
DL Abstract

Around 170 million years ago, the Gulf of Mexico basin flooded catastrophically, and the pre-existing landscape, which had been a very rugged, arid, semi-desert world, was drowned beneath an inland sea of salt water. The drowned landscape was then buried under kilometers of salt, perfectly preserving the older topography. Now, with high-quality 3D seismic data, the salt appears as a transparent layer, and the details of the drowned world can be seen in exquisite detail, providing a unique snapshot of the world on the eve of the flooding event. We can map out hills and valleys, and a system of river gullies and a large, meandering river system. These rivers in turn fed into a deep central lake, whose surface was about 750m below global sea level. This new knowledge also reveals how the Louann Salt was deposited. In contrast to published models, the salt was deposited in a deep water, hypersaline sea. We can estimate the rate of deposition, and it was very fast; we believe that the entire thickness of several kilometers of salt was laid down in a few tens of thousands of years, making it possibly the fastest sustained deposition seen so far in the geological record.

Show more

Request a visit from Frank Peel!

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)

Related Interests

See Also ...