Explorer Geophysical Corner

Gas producers across the northern shelf of the Gulf of Mexico are now targeting super-deep gas plays -- some targets at depths of 26,000 to 33,000 feet (eight to 10 kilometers). To create optimal images of these super-deep gas targets, seismic data need to be acquired with receiver offsets extending to eight to 10 km away from the source.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Explorer Article

Forums add variety, depth to the program at ACE 2006 in Houston

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Explorer Emphasis Article

Awards given this year include Robert M. Mitchum who will receive the 2006 Sidney Powers Memorial Award. All told, 37 awards will be given at this years annual convention in Houston.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Explorer Article

Call it a dispute. A disagreement. A misunderstanding borne of opposing perspectives. Either way, who can do what with seismic data can be a thorny issue for geologists who use the data and for geophysical companies that acquire and provide the data. The contention revolves around Master License Agreements (MLAs) adopted by the Houston-based International Association of Geophysical Contractors.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Explorer Article

Like Sidney Powers himself, Robert Mitchum teamed with peers to convert groundbreaking theories into practical applications. Collaboration resonates throughout the lifework of Robert Mitchum, the 2006 recipient of the Sidney Powers Memorial Award.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Explorer Geophysical Corner

Fizz-gas and commercial-gas reservoirs look identical in stacked P-P seismic data and in migrated P-P images – and the failure of traditional post-stack P-P data to distinguish between these two gas saturations has frustrated efforts by operators to avoid drilling fizz-gas targets for decades. A solution now appears to be available through the use of multicomponent seismic technology.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Explorer Director’s Corner

Where can you have the opportunity, for about $80 per day for the price of admission, to choose from 465 technical talks, 415 posters, view state-of-the-art technology from around the world, and enjoy networking with top geoscientists and business leaders? It is the AAPG Annual Convention and Exhibition (ACE), scheduled for April 9-12 at the George R. Brown Convention Center in Houston.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Explorer Emphasis Article

Going deeper: All-azimuth illumination using ocean bottom seismic is another step in the ongoing effort to acquire better data in the Gulf of Mexico.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Explorer Emphasis Article

For decades – and for many reasons – Libya was off the exploration map, but that’s changed. Today this country with the Mediterranean climate couldn’t be hotter.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Explorer Emphasis Article

Demand for seismic crews is on the rise as geophysical activity increases in all regions.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
DL Abstract

Three-dimensional (3D) seismic-reflection surveys provide one of the most important data types for understanding subsurface depositional systems. Quantitative analysis is commonly restricted to geophysical interpretation of elastic properties of rocks in the subsurface. Wide availability of 3D seismic-reflection data and integration provide opportunities for quantitative analysis of subsurface stratigraphic sequences. Here, we integrate traditional seismic-stratigraphic interpretation with quantitative geomorphologic analysis and numerical modeling to explore new insights into submarine-channel evolution.

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Request a visit from Jacob Covault!

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
VG Abstract

In comparison with the known boundary conditions that promote salt deformation and flow in sedimentary basins, the processes involved with the mobilization of clay-rich detrital sediments are far less well established. This talk will use seismic examples in different tectonic settings to document the variety of shale geometries that can be formed under brittle and ductile deformations.

Request a visit from Juan I. Soto!

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
DL Abstract

Around 170 million years ago, the Gulf of Mexico basin flooded catastrophically, and the pre-existing landscape, which had been a very rugged, arid, semi-desert world, was drowned beneath an inland sea of salt water. The drowned landscape was then buried under kilometers of salt, perfectly preserving the older topography. Now, with high-quality 3D seismic data, the salt appears as a transparent layer, and the details of the drowned world can be seen in exquisite detail, providing a unique snapshot of the world on the eve of the flooding event. We can map out hills and valleys, and a system of river gullies and a large, meandering river system. These rivers in turn fed into a deep central lake, whose surface was about 750m below global sea level. This new knowledge also reveals how the Louann Salt was deposited. In contrast to published models, the salt was deposited in a deep water, hypersaline sea. We can estimate the rate of deposition, and it was very fast; we believe that the entire thickness of several kilometers of salt was laid down in a few tens of thousands of years, making it possibly the fastest sustained deposition seen so far in the geological record.

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Request a visit from Frank Peel!

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)

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