Explorer Geophysical Corner

Seismic contractors are continually searching for methods that will expedite seismic data acquisition – which is why several efforts have been made over the past three decades to develop procedures that will allow vibrators to shake simultaneously at different source stations, with the data being recorded by a common receiver grid.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Explorer Emphasis Article

Angola’s oil industry continues to benefit from new oil discoveries and ever increasing oil production, according to a paper presented at the Deepwater Offshore West Africa Conference (DOWAC) by AAPG member, Tako Koning.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Explorer Article

Her amazing adventure: AAPG member and EXPLORER correspondent Susan R. Eaton got the trip of a lifetime when she was selected for the Elysium Expedition to Antarctica.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Explorer Geophysical Corner

The final guideline that should be used when designing a 3-D survey is the use of the even-integer rule for specifying the exact dimensions of a recording swath.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Explorer Emphasis Article

Dangerous, or not so much? Some are anxious to give the public a different perspective on hydraulic fracturing.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Explorer Emphasis Article

We’ve come a long way, baby: Advances in downhole geology during the past 10 years tell a compelling story about the industry’s accomplishments, expectations and continuing demands.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Explorer Geophysical Corner

This article is the third of a four-article series – the topic this month considers Part 3 and Part 4 labeled on the figure 1 flow chart of 3-D seismic design methodology.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Explorer Emphasis Article

Hot, hot, hot: The Niobrara play joins the list of hot shales – even being dubbed the “NeoBakken.” An industry-sponsored consortium evaluates the complexities of this giant play to help further its economic success.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Explorer Emphasis Article

The circum-Arctic region has ample energy potential, but innovative technology is essential for future exploration. One research geologist explains the need for combining tried and true geology basics with new, creative methods to get the best results.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Explorer Article

Old habits die hard – Not! The prolific California Monterey shale is revisited, but this time with an unconventional approach.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
DL Abstract

Three-dimensional (3D) seismic-reflection surveys provide one of the most important data types for understanding subsurface depositional systems. Quantitative analysis is commonly restricted to geophysical interpretation of elastic properties of rocks in the subsurface. Wide availability of 3D seismic-reflection data and integration provide opportunities for quantitative analysis of subsurface stratigraphic sequences. Here, we integrate traditional seismic-stratigraphic interpretation with quantitative geomorphologic analysis and numerical modeling to explore new insights into submarine-channel evolution.

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Request a visit from Jacob Covault!

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
VG Abstract

In comparison with the known boundary conditions that promote salt deformation and flow in sedimentary basins, the processes involved with the mobilization of clay-rich detrital sediments are far less well established. This talk will use seismic examples in different tectonic settings to document the variety of shale geometries that can be formed under brittle and ductile deformations.

Request a visit from Juan I. Soto!

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
DL Abstract

Around 170 million years ago, the Gulf of Mexico basin flooded catastrophically, and the pre-existing landscape, which had been a very rugged, arid, semi-desert world, was drowned beneath an inland sea of salt water. The drowned landscape was then buried under kilometers of salt, perfectly preserving the older topography. Now, with high-quality 3D seismic data, the salt appears as a transparent layer, and the details of the drowned world can be seen in exquisite detail, providing a unique snapshot of the world on the eve of the flooding event. We can map out hills and valleys, and a system of river gullies and a large, meandering river system. These rivers in turn fed into a deep central lake, whose surface was about 750m below global sea level. This new knowledge also reveals how the Louann Salt was deposited. In contrast to published models, the salt was deposited in a deep water, hypersaline sea. We can estimate the rate of deposition, and it was very fast; we believe that the entire thickness of several kilometers of salt was laid down in a few tens of thousands of years, making it possibly the fastest sustained deposition seen so far in the geological record.

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Request a visit from Frank Peel!

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)

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