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After decades spent visiting Morocco and neighboring Algeria, an AAPG member who's led countless field trips to some of the earth's most exotic places says the two old countries are evolving into modern times.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
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This article reviews the mechanisms of shale gas storage and discusses the major risks or uncertainties for shale gas exploration in China. At a given temperature and pressure, the gas sorption capacities of organic-rich shales are primarily controlled by the organic matter richness but may be significantly influenced by the type and maturity of the organic matter, mineral composition (especially clay content), moisture content, pore volume and structure, resulting in different ratios of gas sorption capacity (GSC) to total organic carbon content for different shales. In laboratory experiments, the GSC of organic-rich shales increases with increasing pressure and decreases with increasing temperature. Under geologic conditions (assuming hydrostatic pressure gradient and constant thermal gradient), the GSC increases initially with depth due to the predominating effect of pressure, passes through a maximum, and then decreases because of the influence of increasing temperature at greater depth. This pattern of variation is quite similar to that observed for coals and is of great significance for understanding the changes in GSC of organic-rich shales over geologic time as a function of burial history. At an elevated temperature and pressure and with the presence of moisture, the gas sorption capacities of organic-rich shales are quite low. As a result, adsorption alone cannot protect sufficient gas for high-maturity organic-rich shales to be commercial gas reservoirs. Two models are proposed to predict the variation of GSC and total gas content over geologic time as a function of burial history. High contents of free gas in organic-rich shales can be preserved in relatively closed systems. Loss of free gas during postgeneration uplift and erosion may result in undersaturation (the total gas contents lower than the sorption capacity) and is the major risk for gas exploration in marine organic-rich shales in China.
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The fact that velocity models based on seismic reflection surveys commonly do not consider the near-surface geology necessitates filling the gap between the top of a velocity model and the surface of the Earth. In this study, we present a new workflow to build a shallow geologic model based exclusively on borehole data and corroborated by laboratory measurements. The study area is in Chemery (France), located at the southwestern border of the Paris Basin, where a large amount of borehole data is publicly available. The workflow starts with identifying lithologic interfaces in the boreholes and interpolating them between the boreholes. The three-dimensional (3-D) geometry of the lithologies then allows interpretation of the position, orientation, and offset of fault planes. Given the importance of the fault interpretation in the modeling process, a combination of different approaches is used to obtain the most reasonable structural framework. After creating a 3-D grid, the resulting 3-D structural model is populated with upscaled velocity logs from the boreholes, yielding the final near-surface P-wave velocity model. To better constrain the velocity model, we conducted laboratory measurements of P- and S-wave velocities in dry and water-saturated conditions on all lithologies in the model. The laboratory data were used to populate the 3-D near-surface model with VP/VS ratio values. The presented workflow accounts for one-dimensional borehole data and is much more iterative and time-consuming than workflows based on two-dimensional seismic sections. Nevertheless, the workflow results in a robust 3-D near-surface model allowing for structural interpretations and revealing the 3-D seismic velocity field.
Show more American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
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Prolific hydrocarbon discoveries in the subsalt, commonly known as the “presalt,” section of Brazil and the conjugate African margin have created a business imperative to predict reservoir quality in lacustrine carbonates. Geothermal convection is a style of groundwater flow known to occur in rift settings, which is capable of diagenetic modification of reservoir quality. We simulated variable density groundwater flow coupled with chemical reactions to evaluate the potential for diagenesis driven by convection in subsalt carbonates.

Rates of calcite diagenesis are critically controlled by temperature gradient and fluid flux following the principles of retrograde solubility. Simulations predict that convection could operate in rift carbonates prior to salt deposition, but with rates of dissolution in the reservoir interval only on the order of 0.01 vol. %/m.y., which is too low to significantly modify reservoir quality. The exception is around permeable fault zones and/or unconformities where flow is focused and dissolution rates are amplified to 1 to 10 vol. %/m.y. and could locally modify reservoir quality. After salt deposition, simulations also predict convection with a critical function for salt rugosity. The greatest potential for dissolution at rates of 0.1 to 1 vol. %/m.y. occurs where salt welds, overlying permeable carbonates thin to 500 m (1640 ft) or less. With tens of million years residence times feasible, convection under these conditions could locally result in reservoir sweet spots with porosity modification of 1% to 10% and potentially an order of magnitude or more in reservoir permeability. Integrating quantitative model–derived predictive diagenetic concepts with traditional subsurface data sets refines exploration to production scale risking of carbonate reservoir presence and quality.

Show more American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
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The Heidrun field, located on the Halten Terrace of the mid-Norwegian continental shelf, was one of the first giant oil fields found in the Norwegian Sea. Traditional reservoir intervals in the Heidrun field lie within the Jurassic synrift sequence. Most Norwegian continental shelf fields have been producing from these Jurassic reservoirs for the past 30 yr. Production has since declined in these mature fields, but recently, exploration for new reservoirs has resurged in this region. The Jurassic rifted fault blocks form a narrow continental shelf in Norway, thereby greatly reducing the areal extent for exploration and development within existing fields. As the rift axis is approached farther offshore, these Jurassic reservoirs become very deep, too risky to drill, and uneconomical. This risk has prompted exploration in more recent years of the shallower Cretaceous, postrift stratigraphic succession. Cretaceous turbidites have been found in the Norwegian and North Seas, and the discovery of the Agat field in the Norwegian North Sea confirms the existence of a working petroleum system capable of charging Cretaceous reservoirs. These Cretaceous reservoirs were deposited as slope- and basin-floor fans within a series of underfilled rifted deeps along the Norwegian continental shelf and are thought to be sourced from the localized erosion of Jurassic rifted highs. We use three-dimensional seismic and well data to document the geomorphology of a deep-water, Lower Cretaceous wedge (Cromer Knoll Group) within the hanging wall of a rift-related half graben formed on the Halten Terrace offshore mid-Norway. Seismic attribute extractions taken within this Lower Cretaceous wedge reveal the presence of several lobate to elongated bodies that seem to cascade over fault-bounded terraces associated with rifted structures. These high-amplitude, elongated bodies are interpreted as deep-water sedimentary conduits that are time equivalent to the Cretaceous basin-floor fans in more distal parts of the basin to the west. These half-graben fills have the potential to contain high-quality Cretaceous sandstones that might represent a potential new reservoir interval within the Heidrun field.
Show more American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
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Were there enough arguments to champion a firm stand for a Pacific origin of the Caribbean lithosphere, as Kevin Burke, Bruce Malfait and others had suggested?

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
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Fracture zones can be critical to improving or creating sufficient porosity and permeability in hydrocarbon reservoirs – with strain, along with lithology and thickness being the major controls.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
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Think fast: A new risk-based approach to geomechanics is being used to help solve horizontal drilling problems.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
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We describe the structure, microstructure, and petrophysical properties of fault rocks from two normal fault zones formed in low-porosity turbiditic arkosic sandstones, in deep diagenesis conditions similar to those of deeply buried reservoirs. These fault rocks are characterized by a foliated fabric and quartz-calcite sealed veins, which formation resulted from the combination of the (1) pressure solution of quartz, (2) intense fracturing sealed by quartz and calcite cements, and (3) neoformation of synkinematic white micas derived from the alteration of feldspars and chlorite. Fluid inclusion microthermometry in quartz and calcite cements demonstrates fault activity at temperatures of 195degC to 268degC. Permeability measurements on plugs oriented parallel with the principal axes of the finite strain ellipsoid show that the Y axis (parallel with the foliation and veins) is the direction of highest permeability in the foliated sandstone (10–2 md for Y against 10–3 md for X, Z, and the protolith, measured at a confining pressure of 20 bars). Microstructural observations document the localization of the preferential fluid path between the phyllosilicate particles forming the foliation. Hence, the direction of highest permeability in these fault rocks would be parallel with the fault and subhorizontal, that is, perpendicular to the slickenlines representing the local slip direction on the fault surface. We suggest that a similar relationship between kinematic markers and fault rock permeability anisotropy may be found in other fault zone types (reverse or strike-slip) affecting feldspar-rich lithologies in deep diagenesis conditions.
Show more American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
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Understanding the distribution and geometry of reservoir geobodies is crucial for net-to-gross estimates and to model subsurface flow. This article focuses on the process of dolomitization and resulting geometry of diagenetic geobodies in an outcrop of Jurassic host rocks from northern Oman. Field and petrographic data show that a first phase of stratabound dolomite is crosscut by a second phase of fault-related dolomite. The stratabound dolomite geobodies are laterally continuous for at least several hundreds of meters (sim1000 ft) and probably regionally and are one-half meter (1.6 ft) thick. Based on petrography and geochemistry, a process of seepage reflux of mesosaline or hypersaline fluids during the early stages of burial diagenesis is proposed for the formation of the stratabound dolomite. In contrast, the fault-related dolomite geobodies are trending along a fault that can be followed for at least 100 m (328 ft) and vary in width from a few tens of centimeters to as much as 10 m (sim1–33 ft). Petrography, geochemistry, and high homogenization temperature of fluid inclusions all point to the formation of the dolomite along a normal fault under deep burial conditions during the Middle to Late Cretaceous. The high 87Sr/86Sr ratio in the dolomite and the high salinity measured in fluid inclusions indicate that the dolomitizing fluids are deep basinal brines that interacted with crystalline basement. The dolomitization styles have an impact on the dimension, texture, and geochemistry of the different dolomite geobodies, and a modified classification scheme (compared to the one from Jung and Aigner, 2012) is proposed to incorporate diagenetic geobodies in future reservoir modeling.
Show more American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
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In-Person Training
Vilnius Lithuania 25 October, 2016 26 October, 2016 32641 Desktop /Portals/0/PackFlashItemImages/WebReady/er-gtw-gtw-hydrocarbon-exploration-lithuania-hero.jpg?width=100&height=100&mode=crop&anchor=middlecenter&quality=75amp;encoder=freeimage&progressive=true Business and Economics, Economics, Reserve Estimation, Development and Operations, Engineering, Conventional Drilling, Coring, Production, Hydraulic Fracturing, Primary Recovery, Secondary Recovery, Gas Injection, Tertiary Recovery, Reservoir Characterization, Environmental, Natural Resources, Pollution, Geochemistry and Basin Modeling, Basin Modeling, Maturation, Migration, Oil and Gas Analysis, Oil Seeps, Petroleum Systems, Source Rock, Thermal History, Geophysics, Direct Hydrocarbon Indicators, Petrophysics and Well Logs, Sedimentology and Stratigraphy, Carbonates, Clastics, Conventional Sandstones, Deep Sea / Deepwater, Deepwater Turbidites, High Stand Deposits, Low Stand Deposits, Marine, Shelf Sand Deposits, Transgressive Deposits, Sequence Stratigraphy, Structure, Tectonics (General), Structural Analysis (Other), Salt Tectonics, Geomechanics and Fracture Analysis, Fold and Thrust Belts, Extensional Systems, Compressional Systems, Deep Basin Gas, Fractured Carbonate Reservoirs, Shale Gas, Stratigraphic Traps, Structural Traps, Subsalt Traps, Alternative Resources, Gas Hydrates
Vilnius, Lithuania
25-26 October 2016

AAPG Europe are excited to announce the first event to be held in the beautiful capital city of Vilnius, Lithuania. This Geosciences Technology Workshop will be based around the main theme "Hydrocarbon Exploration in Lithuania and the Baltic Region" and we expect interests from Latvia, Estonia, Poland and Kaliningrad.

Lithuania 26 October, 2016 26 October, 2016 33520 Desktop /Portals/0/PackFlashItemImages/WebReady/gtw-er-core-workshop-lithuanian-geological-society-2016-hero.jpg?width=100&height=100&mode=crop&anchor=middlecenter&quality=75amp;encoder=freeimage&progressive=true Alternative Resources, Gas Hydrates, Deep Basin Gas, Fractured Carbonate Reservoirs, Shale Gas, Stratigraphic Traps, Structural Traps, Subsalt Traps, Business and Economics, Economics, Reserve Estimation, Development and Operations, Engineering, Conventional Drilling, Coring, Production, Hydraulic Fracturing, Primary Recovery, Tertiary Recovery, Secondary Recovery, Gas Injection, Water Flooding, Reservoir Characterization, Environmental, Natural Resources, Pollution, Water Resources, Geochemistry and Basin Modeling, Basin Modeling, Migration, Oil and Gas Analysis, Oil Seeps, Petroleum Systems, Source Rock, Thermal History, Geophysics, Direct Hydrocarbon Indicators, Petrophysics and Well Logs, Sedimentology and Stratigraphy, Carbonates, Clastics, Conventional Sandstones, Deep Sea / Deepwater, Deepwater Turbidites, Low Stand Deposits, Marine, Shelf Sand Deposits, Transgressive Deposits, Sequence Stratigraphy, High Stand Deposits, Structure, Fold and Thrust Belts, Extensional Systems, Salt Tectonics, Tectonics (General), Geomechanics and Fracture Analysis, Structural Analysis (Other), Compressional Systems
26 October 2016

Join AAPG Europe and the Lithuanian Geological Survey for this exciting Core Workshop. This workshop will follow on from the 'Hydrocarbon Exploration in Lithuania and the Baltic Regions' event taking place at Vilnius University on 24th – 25th October.

The Early Palaeozoic Hydrocarbon System in the Baltic Basin and adjacent territories involves Middle-Late Cambrian, the Late Ordovician (Mossen & Fjacka Formations) and the Early Silurian Graptolitic Shales source rocks and the major complexes of reservoirs, associated with Middle Cambrian sandstones, Ordovician and Silurian reefogenic and carbonate build-ups.

The major reservoirs of the Baltic Basin are:

  • The Middle Cambrian (Deimena Fm). Sandstones - Producing
  • The Early Ordovician (Tremadoc, Salantai Fm.) sandstones
  • Late Ordovician (Early Ashgill) organogenic limestones/carbonate buildups
  • Late Silurian (Late Ludlow/Pridoli) reefogenic carbonate build-ups
Core Presentation:
Cores presented from the following 3 reference wells:

1. The Middle Cambrian - the Early Ordovician quartz sandstone reservoirs

The Middle Cambrian Deimena Group sandstones comprises all the major economically important oil fields located Lithuania, Latvia, Kaliningrad district and Polish onshore and Baltic Sea offshore. The other, much less significant, potential reservoirs are the Late Ordovician carbonate build-ups of Gotland (Sweden) and Southern part of Lithuania and the Late Silurian carbonate reefogenic buildups in South Lithuania (Zdanaviciute O., Sakalauskas J. eds., 2001, Zdanaviciute, Lazauskiene 2007; Kanev et al., 1994).

The reference sections would demonstrate core from fine-grained (dominated by 0.25-0.1 mm fraction (30-75%)) quartz sandstones containing thin clay and siltstone interlayers. The sandstones are to a different degree litified by compaction and predominantly cemented by quartz and diagenetic quartz cement that has the major control on reservoir properties.

The Early Ordovician

The early Ordovician Tremadoc age (Pakerort Regional Stage, Salantai Fm.) strata distributed rather locally are a reservoir unit at the base of the Ordovician succession, comprising quartz sandstones and quartz siltstones of only 0.5 to 4 m thick. It overlays directly to the Middle Cambrian Deimena Group sandstones and together form one reservoir unit with similar reservoir properties. The formation is overlain by the Early Ordovician shales. Several small oil fields are producing from this reservoir unit in the western part of Lithuania.

2. The Late Ordovician (Early Ashgill) and Late Silurian (Late Ludlow/Pridoli) organogenic limestone and reefogenic carbonate buildups reservoirs

The Late Ordovician - The Late Silurian

The reservoir rocks within the Silurian succession are the Wenlock - Early Ludlow and Pridolian reefogenic carbonates comprising secondary dolomites and reefal limestones with thicknesses of tens of meters. Silurian sequences are locally distributed along the Eastern slope of the Baltic Basin. The Wenlockian - Early Ludlow strata are up to 28 m thick; the effective porosity ranges from 12% to 17% and average permeabilities – 12-15 mD. The most favourable conditions for the formation of non-structural traps (reef-associated, lithologic-stratigraphic and combined) are associated with the carbonates (mainly stromoporoidal and crinoidal limestones) sucession of about 90 m thick of the late Ludlow- earliest Pridoli (Minija and Ventspils Formations). The reservoir rocks has mean porosities of 6-15 % and up to 26% and permeability ~465mD, reaching up to 2400mD. The Late Silurian reservoir rocks mainly occur in central and southern Lithuania in the central part of the basin.

3. Late Ordovician (Mossen & Fjacka Formations) and the Early Silurian Llandovery Black Shales

The Late Ordovician Shales

In the central and eastern part of the Baltic Basin the potential source rocks comprises dark grey and black shales of the Late Ordovician Late Caradoc-Early Asghill Fjacka and Mossen formations. Both units are generally thin, reaching only up to 5–10 m; the thicknesses of Fjack & Mossesn Formations are 6 m and 4 m respectively. TOC content are mostly in the 0.9 to 10 % range, with occasional higher values of up to 15 %. The source rock facies are kerogen type II and II-III.

The Early Silurian Shales

Potential source rocks in the Silurian succession are found within the Llandovery, Wenlock and, presumably, Ludlow-aged strata. The Silurian source rocks are composed of dark grey and black graptolite shales and dark grey and black clayey marlstones. Within the Baltic Basin organic matter content generally ranges from 0.7 to 9–11%, but can be as high as 16.46 % (fig. 5.5.b; Zdanaviciute, Lazauskiene, 2004). In terms of petrography, the organic matter is dominated by syngenetic, sapropelic and marine material, together with vitrinite-like particles and abundant faunal remains. Detrital sapropel is scattered as very fine-grained particles and lenses. Liptinite (up to 20%) generally occurs together with dispersed liptodetrinite in sapropelic organic matter, or more rarely as scattered particles. (Zdanavičiūtė, Swadowska 2002, Zdanaviciute, Lazauskiene, 2004, 2007, 2009).

Maturities in the area of interest attain at pre-Silurian level 1.3% Ro and around 1.0% Ro at Silurian source rock level, and reach 1.9% on the prominent West-Lithuanian local temperature high Zdanaviciute, Lazauskiene, 2004, 2007, 2009)

Please note registration for the Core Workshop is available to attendees of the upcoming GTW "Hydrocarbon Exploration in Lithuania and the Baltic Region" on the 24th - 25th October 2016. Please click here for information about the event.

Buenos Aires Argentina 16 November, 2016 18 November, 2016 33655 Desktop /Portals/0/PackFlashItemImages/WebReady/lacr-gtw-moving-toward-the-prediction-of-unconventional-plays-hero-new.jpg?width=100&height=100&mode=crop&anchor=middlecenter&quality=75amp;encoder=freeimage&progressive=true Development and Operations, Engineering, Directional Drilling, Production, Hydraulic Fracturing, Reservoir Characterization, Geochemistry and Basin Modeling, Oil and Gas Analysis, Source Rock, Geophysics, Seismic, Petrophysics and Well Logs, Carbonates, Sedimentology and Stratigraphy, (Carbonate) Shelf Sand Deposits, Clastics, Deep Sea / Deepwater, Marine, Transgressive Deposits, Slope, Structure, Geomechanics and Fracture Analysis, Structural Analysis (Other), Oil Shale, Shale Gas
Buenos Aires, Argentina
16-18 November 2016

Join leading scientists and industry practitioners at Moving toward the Prediction of Unconventional Plays: Lessons Learned from Tight and Shale Reservoirs in Neuquén Basin, Argentina, a Geosciences Technology Workshop (GTW) hosted by the American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG) and the Argentine Association of Petroleum Geologists and Geophysicists (AAGGP).

Houston Texas United States 01 December, 2016 02 December, 2016 33308 Desktop /Portals/0/PackFlashItemImages/WebReady/gtw-new-opportunities-with-drones-2016-hero.jpg?width=100&height=100&mode=crop&anchor=middlecenter&quality=75amp;encoder=freeimage&progressive=true Alternative Resources, Business and Economics, Resource Estimates, Engineering, Development and Operations, Environmental, Structure, Drones
Houston, Texas, United States
1-2 December 2016

Welcome to a workshop in which we will bring together experts, equipment providers, robotics experts, and others knowledgeable in a wide range of commercial drone usage, which includes monitoring in the oil industry, digital outcrop surveying, safety and security monitoring, utility inspection, real estate, agriculture, construction, environmental protection, and more.

Houston Texas United States 06 December, 2016 08 December, 2016 13606 Desktop /Portals/0/PackFlashItemImages/WebReady/sc-basic-petroleum-geology-for-the-non-geologist.jpg?width=100&height=100&mode=crop&anchor=middlecenter&quality=75amp;encoder=freeimage&progressive=true Structure, Geochemistry and Basin Modeling, Sedimentology and Stratigraphy, Geophysics, Engineering, Petrophysics and Well Logs, Basin Modeling, Source Rock, Petroleum Systems, Production
Houston, Texas, United States
6-8 December 2016

Here is an introduction to the tools and techniques that geologists and geophysicists use to locate gas and oil, that drillers use to drill the wells and that petroleum engineers use to test and complete the wells and produce the gas and oil. Exercises throughout the course provide practical experience in well log correlation, contouring, interpretation of surface and subsurface, contoured maps, seismic interpretation, well log interpretation, and decline curve analysis.

Houston Texas United States 24 January, 2017 25 January, 2017 33528 Desktop /Portals/0/PackFlashItemImages/WebReady/gtw-deepwater-shelf-2016-hero.jpg?width=100&height=100&mode=crop&anchor=middlecenter&quality=75amp;encoder=freeimage&progressive=true Engineering, Development and Operations, Reservoir Characterization, Geochemistry and Basin Modeling, Basin Modeling, Geophysics, Clastics, Sedimentology and Stratigraphy, Deep Sea / Deepwater, Deepwater Turbidites, Shelf Sand Deposits, Structure, Structural Analysis (Other), Fractured Carbonate Reservoirs, Stratigraphic Traps, Subsalt Traps
Houston, Texas, United States
24-25 January 2017

The goal of this event is to bring together new technologies and developments in both exploring for new frontiers and developing known provinces in both deepwater and shelf environments. The event brings together geology, geochemistry, engineering, and geophysics.

Yangon Myanmar 24 February, 2017 27 February, 2017 34027 Desktop /Portals/0/PackFlashItemImages/WebReady/AAPG-EAGE-MGS-Myanmar-Geosciences-Conference-Hero-v2.jpg?width=100&height=100&mode=crop&anchor=middlecenter&quality=75amp;encoder=freeimage&progressive=true Structure, Geochemistry and Basin Modeling, Sedimentology and Stratigraphy, Business and Economics, Engineering, Basin Modeling, Petroleum Systems, Oil and Gas Analysis, Maturation, Clastics, Carbonates, Evaporites, Economics, Reservoir Characterization, Development and Operations, Production
Yangon, Myanmar
24-27 February 2017

The Myanmar Geosciences Society will offer a 3-day/2-night field trip to the Kalaw Basin to visit Mesozoic sediments of Kialaw Basin and view conspicuous surface geologic expressions of Sagaing Strike Slip Fault and Shan Boundary fault (Suture Zone), as well as various Paleozoic to Tertiary outcrops along the road sections. Download the Itinerary and Registration form from the right bar.

Online Training
30 October, 2014 30 October, 2014 11390 Desktop /Portals/0/PackFlashItemImages/WebReady/sc-kerogen-maturity-determinations.jpg?width=100&height=100&mode=crop&anchor=middlecenter&quality=75amp;encoder=freeimage&progressive=true
30 October 2014

Cross disciplinary workflows play an important part of successful characterization of shale reservoirs. This course discusses how the artificial kerogen maturity of organic-rich Green River shale affects the petrophysical, micro-structural, geochemical and elastic properties.

21 August, 2014 21 August, 2099 10831 Desktop /Portals/0/PackFlashItemImages/WebReady/esymp-mexicos-oil-and-gas-history-new-discoveries-opportunities-and-energy-reform-hero.jpg?width=100&height=100&mode=crop&anchor=middlecenter&quality=75amp;encoder=freeimage&progressive=true
21 August 2014 - 21 August 2099
The goal of this e-symposium is to review the status of the Mexican upstream sector, and to provide a review of the most prolific and prospective areas in Mexico, with a focus on opportunities for international participation, given the upcoming energy reform in Mexico. 
09 September, 2014 09 September, 2014 10591 Desktop /Portals/0/PackFlashItemImages/WebReady/esymp-fluid-migration-and-accumulation-within-the-mississippian-why-2-oil-cut-here-15-one-mile-away-hero.jpg?width=100&height=100&mode=crop&anchor=middlecenter&quality=75amp;encoder=freeimage&progressive=true
9 September 2014
Water cut is a big factor in gauging the success of horizontal drilling in the Mississippi Lime Play (MLP). The contributing factors are related in part to the spectrum of producing lithofacies and reservoir quality encountered that varies laterally and vertically, sometimes dramatically. 
10 May, 2012 10 May, 2012 1486 Desktop /Portals/0/PackFlashItemImages/WebReady/oc-es-genetic-sequences-in-eagle-ford-austin.jpg?width=100&height=100&mode=crop&anchor=middlecenter&quality=75amp;encoder=freeimage&progressive=true
10 May 2012

Recognition and Correlation of the Eagle Ford, Austin Formations in South Texas can be enhanced with High Resolution Biostratigraphy, fossil abundance peaks and Maximum Flooding Surfaces correlated to Upper Cretaceous sequence stratigraphic cycle chart after Gradstein, 2010.

29 September, 2011 29 September, 2011 1478 Desktop /Portals/0/PackFlashItemImages/WebReady/oc-es-application-of-inversion-and-clustering-analysis.jpg?width=100&height=100&mode=crop&anchor=middlecenter&quality=75amp;encoder=freeimage&progressive=true
29 September 2011

This study will focus in the combination of λρ – μρ inversion with clustering analysis techniques in order to discriminate brittle zones in the Barnett Shale.

04 October, 2012 04 October, 2012 1491 Desktop /Portals/0/PackFlashItemImages/WebReady/oc-es-microseismic-imaging-of-hydraulic-fractures.jpg?width=100&height=100&mode=crop&anchor=middlecenter&quality=75amp;encoder=freeimage&progressive=true
4 October 2012

Effective hydraulic fracture stimulation is critical for shale development, and microseismic is the only technology able to map the growth of these hydraulic fracture networks.

12 July, 2012 12 July, 2012 1490 Desktop /Portals/0/PackFlashItemImages/WebReady/oc-es-shale-wells-making-the-engineering-fit-what-geology-offers.jpg?width=100&height=100&mode=crop&anchor=middlecenter&quality=75amp;encoder=freeimage&progressive=true
12 July 2012

This presentation will look at well placement vertically in the pay, well azimuth and well trajectory with explanations of how geology and post-depositional effects can make the difference between a successful well and a failure.

20 January, 2012 20 January, 2012 1482 Desktop /Portals/0/PackFlashItemImages/WebReady/oc-es-eagle-ford-shale-prospecting-with-3d-seismic-data.jpg?width=100&height=100&mode=crop&anchor=middlecenter&quality=75amp;encoder=freeimage&progressive=true
20 January 2012

The Eagle Ford Shale in South Texas is one of the more exciting shale plays in the United States at the current time.

16 February, 2012 16 February, 2012 1483 Desktop /Portals/0/PackFlashItemImages/WebReady/oc-es-seismically-driven-characterization-of-unconventional-shale-plays.jpg?width=100&height=100&mode=crop&anchor=middlecenter&quality=75amp;encoder=freeimage&progressive=true
16 February 2012

This presentation describes a proven workflow that uses a standard narrow azimuth 3D seismic, conventional logs, image logs and core data to build five key reservoir properties required for an optimal development of shale plays.

07 June, 2012 07 June, 2012 1488 Desktop /Portals/0/PackFlashItemImages/WebReady/oc-es-new-production-in-oil-fields.jpg?width=100&height=100&mode=crop&anchor=middlecenter&quality=75amp;encoder=freeimage&progressive=true
7 June 2012

Unger Field, discovered in1955, has produced 8.6 million barrels of oil from a thinly (several ft) bedded, locally cherty dolomite containing vuggy and intercrystalline porosity.

01 January, 2013 01 January, 9999 1459 Desktop /Portals/0/PackFlashItemImages/WebReady/oc-cc-giant-oil-and-gas-fields.jpg?width=100&height=100&mode=crop&anchor=middlecenter&quality=75amp;encoder=freeimage&progressive=true
1 January 2013 - 1 January 9999

There are more approximately 1,000 oil and gas fields in the world that have been classified as "giant," containing more than 500 million barrels of recoverable oil and /or 3 trillion cubic feet of gas.

05 March, 2014 05 March, 2014 3812 Desktop /Portals/0/PackFlashItemImages/WebReady/oc-es-virtual-field-trip-grand-canyon-bryce-and-zion.jpg?width=100&height=100&mode=crop&anchor=middlecenter&quality=75amp;encoder=freeimage&progressive=true
5 March 2014

Explore three of the great wonders of the geological world. Take a guided tour of classic geological sites on the Colorado Plateau.

15 March, 2012 15 March, 2012 1484 Desktop /Portals/0/PackFlashItemImages/WebReady/oc-es-exploring-the-geopressure-risk-in-deep-water-frontier-plays.jpg?width=100&height=100&mode=crop&anchor=middlecenter&quality=75amp;encoder=freeimage&progressive=true
15 March 2012

This e-symposium presents techniques for predicting pore pressure in seals by examining case studies from the Gulf of Mexico and incorporating the relationship between rocks, fluids, stress, and pressure.

09 February, 2012 09 February, 2012 1477 Desktop /Portals/0/PackFlashItemImages/WebReady/oc-es-seismic-reservoir-characterization-of-us-shales.jpg?width=100&height=100&mode=crop&anchor=middlecenter&quality=75amp;encoder=freeimage&progressive=true
9 February 2012

Projects in several shales will be discussed, including Marcellus, Eagle Ford, Haynesville, Fayetteville, Montney, and Barnett, as will several seismically-detectable drivers for success including lithofacies, stress, pre-existing fractures, and pore pressure.

08 December, 2011 08 December, 2011 1480 Desktop /Portals/0/PackFlashItemImages/WebReady/oc-es-connectivity-in-fluvial-systems.jpg?width=100&height=100&mode=crop&anchor=middlecenter&quality=75amp;encoder=freeimage&progressive=true
8 December 2011

This e-symposium focuses on methods for predicting connectivity within clastic fluvial systems.

25 August, 2011 25 August, 2011 1475 Desktop /Portals/0/PackFlashItemImages/WebReady/oc-es-overview-of-hydraulic-fracturing-mechanics-analysis-and-design.jpg?width=100&height=100&mode=crop&anchor=middlecenter&quality=75amp;encoder=freeimage&progressive=true
25 August 2011

This e-symposium provides highlights of the hydraulic fracturing mechanics, analysis, and design, and is derived from a two and one-half (2-1/2) day course which is designed for drilling, completion, production engineers, engineering technicians, geologists, well-site and completion supervisors, and managers, who desire to possess a comprehensive and integral knowledge of Hydraulic Fracturing.

28 April, 2011 28 April, 2011 1471 Desktop /Portals/0/PackFlashItemImages/WebReady/oc-es-niobrara-petroleum-system-a-major-tight-resource-play.jpg?width=100&height=100&mode=crop&anchor=middlecenter&quality=75amp;encoder=freeimage&progressive=true
28 April 2011

The Niobrara Petroleum System of the U.S. Rocky Mountain Region is a major tight petroleum resource play.

17 March, 2011 17 March, 2011 1470 Desktop /Portals/0/PackFlashItemImages/WebReady/oc-es-basic-tools-for-shale-exploration.jpg?width=100&height=100&mode=crop&anchor=middlecenter&quality=75amp;encoder=freeimage&progressive=true
17 March 2011

This e-symposium will provide information on which tools, processes, and procedures all geoscientists, engineers, and technical professionals working in shale plays need to understand and implement.

14 December, 2010 14 December, 2010 1467 Desktop /Portals/0/PackFlashItemImages/WebReady/oc-es-sale-gas-in-quebecs-sedimentary-basins.jpg?width=100&height=100&mode=crop&anchor=middlecenter&quality=75amp;encoder=freeimage&progressive=true
14 December 2010

Recent interest in unconventional gas resources has attracted several oil and gas explorers to sedimentary basins in Southern Quebec.

09 December, 2010 09 December, 2010 1466 Desktop /Portals/0/PackFlashItemImages/WebReady/oc-es-bakken-petroleum-system-of-the-williston-basin.jpg?width=100&height=100&mode=crop&anchor=middlecenter&quality=75amp;encoder=freeimage&progressive=true
9 December 2010

The Mississippian-Devonian Bakken Petroleum System of the Williston Basin is characterized by low-porosity and permeability reservoirs, organic-rich source rocks, and regional hydrocarbon charge.

21 October, 2010 21 October, 2010 1464 Desktop /Portals/0/PackFlashItemImages/WebReady/oc-es-evaluating-mature-fields.jpg?width=100&height=100&mode=crop&anchor=middlecenter&quality=75amp;encoder=freeimage&progressive=true
21 October 2010

This e-symposium covers how to conduct an interdisciplinary evaluation of mature fields to determine the best approach to recover remaining reserves.

19 August, 2010 19 August, 2010 1462 Desktop /Portals/0/PackFlashItemImages/WebReady/oc-es-challenging-the-paradigm-missing-section-normal-fault.jpg?width=100&height=100&mode=crop&anchor=middlecenter&quality=75amp;encoder=freeimage&progressive=true
19 August 2010

This presentation will show where there are cases of missing sections, but none of them can be attributed to normal faulting.

22 July, 2010 22 July, 2010 1461 Desktop /Portals/0/PackFlashItemImages/WebReady/oc-es-all-shale-gas-reservoirs-are-not-the-same.jpg?width=100&height=100&mode=crop&anchor=middlecenter&quality=75amp;encoder=freeimage&progressive=true
22 July 2010

Upon successful completion of this course, you will be able to describe geomechanics in shale reservoirs and discuss differences between plays.

03 June, 2010 03 June, 2010 1460 Desktop /Portals/0/PackFlashItemImages/WebReady/oc-es-marcellus-utica-in-the-field.jpg?width=100&height=100&mode=crop&anchor=middlecenter&quality=75amp;encoder=freeimage&progressive=true
3 June 2010

Upon successful completion of this course, you will be able to describe faults and fractures in carbonates, black shales, and coarser clastics as they occur in the northern Appalachian Basin.

25 March, 2010 25 March, 2010 1458 Desktop /Portals/0/PackFlashItemImages/WebReady/oc-es-mapping-natural-fractures-using-3d-seismic-and-well-data.jpg?width=100&height=100&mode=crop&anchor=middlecenter&quality=75amp;encoder=freeimage&progressive=true
25 March 2010

The presentation describes a well established fracture modeling workflow that uses a standard 3D seismic, conventional logs, image logs and data from one core to build predictive 3D fracture models that are validated with blind wells.

25 January, 2011 25 January, 2011 1454 Desktop /Portals/0/PackFlashItemImages/WebReady/oc-es-integrating-discipline-data-and-workflows-in-resource-play.jpg?width=100&height=100&mode=crop&anchor=middlecenter&quality=75amp;encoder=freeimage&progressive=true
25 January 2011

This esymposium takes a close look at workflows associated with resource plays, and analyzes where integration must occur between disciplines, data, and workflows at all phases of the process.

01 November, 2013 01 November, 9999 452 Desktop /Portals/0/PackFlashItemImages/WebReady/oc-toc-petroleum-exploration-production.jpg?width=100&height=100&mode=crop&anchor=middlecenter&quality=75amp;encoder=freeimage&progressive=true
1 November 2013 - 1 November 9999

This online course provides an overview of the petroleum industry from what is natural gas and crude oil to how to explore, drill, and produce oil and gas.

14 February, 3000 14 February, 3000 7817 Desktop /Portals/0/PackFlashItemImages/WebReady/oc-es-generic-hero.jpg?width=100&height=100&mode=crop&anchor=middlecenter&quality=75amp;encoder=freeimage&progressive=true
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