Explorer Emphasis Article

The geophysical industry is facing a host of environmental and safety issues that could significantly impact the bottom line of seismic operations -- and in some cases hamper access to certain regions of the world.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Explorer Emphasis Article

If you could listen to a heartbeat of the geophysical industry today, you might be tempted to call 911. While not yet to the life support stage, the health of this sector might best be described as poor and still declining.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Explorer Emphasis Article

If you could listen to a heartbeat of the geophysical industry today, you might be tempted to call 911. While not yet to the life support stage, the health of this sector might best be described as poor and still declining.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Explorer Emphasis Article

Coming soon: A new USGS resource assessment of the National Petroleum Reserve-Alaska, an area that may hold the key to Alaska's exploration future.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Explorer Article

Look out below! For successful drilling project, exploration strategies are going to have to dig deeper -- and that could be good news for the eastern U.S. Midcontinent.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Explorer Article

It took a long time, but one geologist finally helped prove the deep reservoir potential of the Trenton-Black River formations in the Appalachian Basin.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Explorer Article

Yes, technology is a factor for success in the field — but did you know it's also a factor for success before you go out into the field? Call it the 3-D seismic advantage.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Explorer Article

Regulations regarding seismic exploration on federal land — an important factor in any program, but especially in the U.S. West, where so much of the land is federal acreage — are causing companies and crews to rethink their operations.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Explorer Geophysical Corner

The Geophysical Corner is a regular column in the EXPLORER, edited by R. Randy Ray. This month's column is the second of a two-part series titled 'Seismic to Well Ties with Problematic Sonic Logs.'

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Explorer Emphasis Article

Convention Theater highlights technology.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
DL Abstract

Three-dimensional (3D) seismic-reflection surveys provide one of the most important data types for understanding subsurface depositional systems. Quantitative analysis is commonly restricted to geophysical interpretation of elastic properties of rocks in the subsurface. Wide availability of 3D seismic-reflection data and integration provide opportunities for quantitative analysis of subsurface stratigraphic sequences. Here, we integrate traditional seismic-stratigraphic interpretation with quantitative geomorphologic analysis and numerical modeling to explore new insights into submarine-channel evolution.

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Request a visit from Jacob Covault!

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
DL Abstract

Around 170 million years ago, the Gulf of Mexico basin flooded catastrophically, and the pre-existing landscape, which had been a very rugged, arid, semi-desert world, was drowned beneath an inland sea of salt water. The drowned landscape was then buried under kilometers of salt, perfectly preserving the older topography. Now, with high-quality 3D seismic data, the salt appears as a transparent layer, and the details of the drowned world can be seen in exquisite detail, providing a unique snapshot of the world on the eve of the flooding event. We can map out hills and valleys, and a system of river gullies and a large, meandering river system. These rivers in turn fed into a deep central lake, whose surface was about 750m below global sea level. This new knowledge also reveals how the Louann Salt was deposited. In contrast to published models, the salt was deposited in a deep water, hypersaline sea. We can estimate the rate of deposition, and it was very fast; we believe that the entire thickness of several kilometers of salt was laid down in a few tens of thousands of years, making it possibly the fastest sustained deposition seen so far in the geological record.

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Request a visit from Frank Peel!

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
VG Abstract

In comparison with the known boundary conditions that promote salt deformation and flow in sedimentary basins, the processes involved with the mobilization of clay-rich detrital sediments are far less well established. This talk will use seismic examples in different tectonic settings to document the variety of shale geometries that can be formed under brittle and ductile deformations.

Request a visit from Juan I. Soto!

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)

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