Explorer Geophysical Corner

This month’s column is the first of a two-part series dealing with seismic wave tests – horizontal wave testing.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Explorer Director’s Corner

Over a year ago AAPG and SEG developed an ad hoc “joint cooperation committee” to review each society’s respective programs and look for different ways to cooperate. Then-AAPG President Will Green initiated the ad hoc joint committee at the end of his term with his counterpart, Fred Aminzadeh at SEG. Scott Tinker and John Lorenz continued the committee along with their SEG counterparts Larry Lines and Stephen Hill.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Explorer Emphasis Article

Well, shake it up, baby: Hydro-impact technology is using seismic wave stimulation technology to shake loose residual oil trapped in the reservoirs around existing wells.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Explorer Emphasis Article

Well data isn’t the geologists only tool to assess potential of deep basins or frontier areas. Think 'source rock.'

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Explorer Article

A recent AAPG Geosciences Technology Workshop examined the contributions, challenges and responsibilities of geoscientists in estimating resources and reserves.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Explorer Geophysical Corner

This month’s column deals with determining reservoir heterogeneity in Athabasca oil sands from surface seismic data. 

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Explorer Emphasis Article

When it comes to geothermal energy, Germany is feeling the heat – literally and figuratively – beneath its feet.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Explorer Emphasis Article

Sweet smell of success: A run of offshore discoveries have made Brazil the oil industry’s story of the century – and the celebration there may just be starting.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Explorer Geophysical Corner

Seismic reflection amplitude can be related to net pay and can provide information about the presence or absence of hydrocarbons in a reservoir interval.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Explorer Article

WEB EXCLUSIVE: A comprehensive look at the use of cutting-edge technology in Egypt’s Western Desert – including the application of new seismic, drilling and stimulation operations – helped make AAPG’s first international Geoscience Technical Workshop a big success.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
VG Abstract

In comparison with the known boundary conditions that promote salt deformation and flow in sedimentary basins, the processes involved with the mobilization of clay-rich detrital sediments are far less well established. This talk will use seismic examples in different tectonic settings to document the variety of shale geometries that can be formed under brittle and ductile deformations.

Request a visit from Juan I. Soto!

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
DL Abstract

Three-dimensional (3D) seismic-reflection surveys provide one of the most important data types for understanding subsurface depositional systems. Quantitative analysis is commonly restricted to geophysical interpretation of elastic properties of rocks in the subsurface. Wide availability of 3D seismic-reflection data and integration provide opportunities for quantitative analysis of subsurface stratigraphic sequences. Here, we integrate traditional seismic-stratigraphic interpretation with quantitative geomorphologic analysis and numerical modeling to explore new insights into submarine-channel evolution.

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Request a visit from Jacob Covault!

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
DL Abstract

Around 170 million years ago, the Gulf of Mexico basin flooded catastrophically, and the pre-existing landscape, which had been a very rugged, arid, semi-desert world, was drowned beneath an inland sea of salt water. The drowned landscape was then buried under kilometers of salt, perfectly preserving the older topography. Now, with high-quality 3D seismic data, the salt appears as a transparent layer, and the details of the drowned world can be seen in exquisite detail, providing a unique snapshot of the world on the eve of the flooding event. We can map out hills and valleys, and a system of river gullies and a large, meandering river system. These rivers in turn fed into a deep central lake, whose surface was about 750m below global sea level. This new knowledge also reveals how the Louann Salt was deposited. In contrast to published models, the salt was deposited in a deep water, hypersaline sea. We can estimate the rate of deposition, and it was very fast; we believe that the entire thickness of several kilometers of salt was laid down in a few tens of thousands of years, making it possibly the fastest sustained deposition seen so far in the geological record.

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Request a visit from Frank Peel!

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)

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