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AAPG is excited about presenting THREE Short Courses in four days! Basic Seismic Interpretation   17-18 May 2016 'Old' (pre-1958) Electric Logs: A Quick Review 19 May 2016 Quick Guide to Carbonate Well Log Analysis   20 May 2016

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Learn! Blog

This course is intended for engineers who need a better understanding of the geology and geological concepts used in exploration and production decisions, including petroleum engineers, drilling and completion engineers and others who may need a basic petroleum geology refresher. It will also be valuable for GeoTechs, Landmen, Bankers, Office staff and others who work with geologists and need a basic knowledge of geology and geologic terminology and processes.

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American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Explorer Geophysical Corner

Over the last few years, several articles on multicomponent seismic data have appeared in Geophysical Corner describing various aspects of processing and interpretation of such data. In this article, we address an important question about correlation of synthetic seismograms with converted wave PS seismic data.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Middle East Blog

This three-day workshop aims at sharing knowledge and ideas on the advancements in subsurface mapping. This includes recent technologies in acquiring seismic and non seismic data, improvements in imaging the subsurface and advances in data interpretation.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Explorer Geophysical Corner

Our seismic industry has witnessed many revolutions, starting from refraction to reflection imaging (1919), analog to digital recording (1963), the introduction of the common depth point (CDP) technique (1952) and the transition from 2-D to 3-D P-wave seismic data in the 1980s.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Explorer Emphasis Article

Developing acceptable source alternatives to the airgun is a complex endeavor.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Explorer Emphasis Article

Computers have taken on more and more of the load in seismic interpretation. But advances in computational seismology and the use of seismic attributes won’t remove the geologist from the equation.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Explorer Emphasis Article

Touted as a “revolutionary” fault-imaging attribute, Thinned Fault Likelihood (TFL) is proving to be a relatively new and successful tool for revealing sweet spots and fracture proximity in highly faulted formations, said AAPG member Hesham Refayee, a geoscientist at dGB Earth Sciences.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Explorer Geophysical Corner

The main goal for shale resource characterization is usually the identification of sweet spots, which represent the most favorable drilling targets. Such sweet spots can be identified as those pockets in the target formation that exhibit high total organic carbon (TOC) content, as well as high brittleness. As there is no direct way of computing TOC using seismic data, we adopt indirect ways for doing so.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Latin America Blog

Looking for hassle free, cost-effective ways to keep your employees and your company competitive during the industry downturn? AAPG can provide you with customized in-house courses offered at reasonable rates.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
VG Abstract

In comparison with the known boundary conditions that promote salt deformation and flow in sedimentary basins, the processes involved with the mobilization of clay-rich detrital sediments are far less well established. This talk will use seismic examples in different tectonic settings to document the variety of shale geometries that can be formed under brittle and ductile deformations.

Request a visit from Juan I. Soto!

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
DL Abstract

Around 170 million years ago, the Gulf of Mexico basin flooded catastrophically, and the pre-existing landscape, which had been a very rugged, arid, semi-desert world, was drowned beneath an inland sea of salt water. The drowned landscape was then buried under kilometers of salt, perfectly preserving the older topography. Now, with high-quality 3D seismic data, the salt appears as a transparent layer, and the details of the drowned world can be seen in exquisite detail, providing a unique snapshot of the world on the eve of the flooding event. We can map out hills and valleys, and a system of river gullies and a large, meandering river system. These rivers in turn fed into a deep central lake, whose surface was about 750m below global sea level. This new knowledge also reveals how the Louann Salt was deposited. In contrast to published models, the salt was deposited in a deep water, hypersaline sea. We can estimate the rate of deposition, and it was very fast; we believe that the entire thickness of several kilometers of salt was laid down in a few tens of thousands of years, making it possibly the fastest sustained deposition seen so far in the geological record.

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Request a visit from Frank Peel!

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
DL Abstract

Three-dimensional (3D) seismic-reflection surveys provide one of the most important data types for understanding subsurface depositional systems. Quantitative analysis is commonly restricted to geophysical interpretation of elastic properties of rocks in the subsurface. Wide availability of 3D seismic-reflection data and integration provide opportunities for quantitative analysis of subsurface stratigraphic sequences. Here, we integrate traditional seismic-stratigraphic interpretation with quantitative geomorphologic analysis and numerical modeling to explore new insights into submarine-channel evolution.

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Request a visit from Jacob Covault!

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)

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