Explorer Geophysical Corner

In this month's Geophysical Corner the authors illustrate the use of a technique known as corendering to assist fault interpretations in a structurally complex area.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Explorer Emphasis Article

Rocky Mountain high: AAPG turns the spotlight on Denver for its 94th Annual Convention and Exhibition, which starts June 7 at the Colorado Convention Center.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Explorer Article

Astronaut, geologist, and AAPG member Jim Reilly explores how space technology could be applied to the oil and gas industry.     

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Explorer Geophysical Corner

Sequestration of CO2 in sealed brine reservoirs is an important issue in industrialized countries that are concerned about the impact of excessive atmospheric CO2 on the environment.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Explorer Article

A personal connection with a legendary geologist Hollis Hedberg triggered Georges Pardo’s personal connection with Cuba – and that bond has led to a new AAPG book on the island’s geology.     

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Explorer Article

The eye of the beholder: Everyone knows Colorado is a beautiful state. The big question is, how did it get that way?     

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Explorer Geophysical Corner

Last month we looked at the concept of utilizing the axial impacts of the rotating teeth of a rotary-cone drill bit as a downhole seismic source, which allows seismic data to be acquired by surfacepositioned sensors as a well is being drilled.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Explorer Article

Egypt’s diverse and prolific Western Desert hydrocarbon province will provide the context and the content of AAPG’s inaugural international Geosciences Technology Workshop (GTW).

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Explorer Emphasis Article

A gift from above: North Dakota’s Red Wing Creek Field is among a handful of oil and gas fields in the world that can trace its potential to meteorite impact.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Explorer Emphasis Article

Careful, careful … The environmentally sensitive regions of the American West are sparking increasing interest in new cable free seismic systems.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
DL Abstract

Three-dimensional (3D) seismic-reflection surveys provide one of the most important data types for understanding subsurface depositional systems. Quantitative analysis is commonly restricted to geophysical interpretation of elastic properties of rocks in the subsurface. Wide availability of 3D seismic-reflection data and integration provide opportunities for quantitative analysis of subsurface stratigraphic sequences. Here, we integrate traditional seismic-stratigraphic interpretation with quantitative geomorphologic analysis and numerical modeling to explore new insights into submarine-channel evolution.

Show more

Request a visit from Jacob Covault!

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
VG Abstract

In comparison with the known boundary conditions that promote salt deformation and flow in sedimentary basins, the processes involved with the mobilization of clay-rich detrital sediments are far less well established. This talk will use seismic examples in different tectonic settings to document the variety of shale geometries that can be formed under brittle and ductile deformations.

Request a visit from Juan I. Soto!

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
DL Abstract

Around 170 million years ago, the Gulf of Mexico basin flooded catastrophically, and the pre-existing landscape, which had been a very rugged, arid, semi-desert world, was drowned beneath an inland sea of salt water. The drowned landscape was then buried under kilometers of salt, perfectly preserving the older topography. Now, with high-quality 3D seismic data, the salt appears as a transparent layer, and the details of the drowned world can be seen in exquisite detail, providing a unique snapshot of the world on the eve of the flooding event. We can map out hills and valleys, and a system of river gullies and a large, meandering river system. These rivers in turn fed into a deep central lake, whose surface was about 750m below global sea level. This new knowledge also reveals how the Louann Salt was deposited. In contrast to published models, the salt was deposited in a deep water, hypersaline sea. We can estimate the rate of deposition, and it was very fast; we believe that the entire thickness of several kilometers of salt was laid down in a few tens of thousands of years, making it possibly the fastest sustained deposition seen so far in the geological record.

Show more

Request a visit from Frank Peel!

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)

Related Interests

See Also ...