Explorer Emphasis Article

With oil reaching historic lows, massive layoffs, a growing stigma against fossil fuels, and new fields of science with a futuristic feel, it is understandable why studying the geosciences – particularly for careers in petroleum – might strike a student as a bad idea. Most would agree the oil and gas industry has a major public relations crisis on its hands. To remain relevant, it must demonstrate the growing need for geoscientists in forward-thinking positions where job security is all but a given.

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American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Learn! Blog

New energy technologies are making geological knowledge more important than ever, but often in unexpected ways. Welcome to an interview with Mike Stephenson, head of the British Geological Survey’s Decarbonisation Programme, which has a wide range of projects that range from geothermal, CCS, compressed air energy storage, to hydrogen storage and heat storage. (AAPG will feature presentations and panel discussions on this topic at ACE 2020 in Houston.)

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American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Explorer Division Column EMD

What’s in a name? Should we call it a transition? A convergence? A transformation? A revolution? A tipping-point? A paradigm shift? Consider that perhaps the name is largely irrelevant, except to sell conference tickets. There’s a radical shift afoot that affects the business model for global energy delivery and consumption. And with it comes with a wealth of opportunities for energy geoscientists, as well as an obligation for every professional society to help its members prepare for the future.

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American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Explorer Emphasis Article

Scott Tinker, director of the Bureau of Economic Geology at the University of Texas at Austin, will grant no quarter about either the history and benefits of energy in our lives or its potential to improve our future. “Access to affordable, reliable energy is the foundation of modern economies,” he said. This subject has been on his mind of late, for he has spent the last two years studying those who are, as he puts it, suffering from “energy poverty.” Some 2.5 billion people worldwide live in some form of energy poverty today. “Access to secure energy,” Tinker said, “impacts all other major humanitarian issues, including hunger, shelter, clean water, education, healthcare, human migration, empowerment of women, and more. Those who do not have energy access suffer from energy poverty.”

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American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Explorer Division Column DEG

In order to support our modern society in an ever- growing global population, energy supplies must converge to meet that growing demand.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Explorer Emphasis Article

“Undoubtedly, yes, the world must accelerate its transition to renewable energy. Cost is no longer a major barrier for renewables.” That’s Sir Mark Moody-Stuart, chairman of the United Nations Global Compact Foundation, an organization dedicated to finding what it calls “lasting solutions” to the world’s pressing global needs, including, for our purposes here, energy.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Explorer Emphasis Article

While many see the energy transition as the switch from carbon-based to non- carbon-based fuels, Scott Tinker sees a broader definition. Tinker, past AAPG president, director of the Bureau of Economic Geology and Texas state geologist, suggested the goal of a successful transition is lifting some 2.5 billion people out of poverty by addressing energy poverty, as well as by minimizing environmental impacts.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Explorer Emphasis Article

Wind, solar and biofuels have a long way to go before they’re sufficiently reliable to replace fossil fuels as the world’s primary energy source, but in the meantime, carbon capture and storage will play an integral role in the global transition to sustainable energy.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Explorer Emphasis Article

The two most compelling words in the Middle East oil industry today might be “natural gas.” And there are other, increasingly important word pairs not usually associated with the Middle East oil industry, like “unconventional resources” and “renewable energy.”

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
EMD Blog

EMD is mapping a path to the future in Houston. Submit your abstract for an EMD session by September 26 for  ACE 2020. 

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Workshop
Netherlands
Tuesday, 5 April Wednesday, 6 April 2022, 8:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m.

Plan to attend Geothermal Crossover Technology workshop 4 on 5-6 April 2022. The workshop will offer an exciting knowledge sharing and discussion platform where industry experts, country representatives and academia can share their visions and perspectives on how the petroleum and geothermal industries can work together to create new opportunities to make geothermal energy exploration and production a reality.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Short Course
Virtual Short Course
Wednesday, 3 November 2021, 4:00 p.m.–8:00 p.m.

Join us for 'Multi-Criteria Geothermal Resource Assessment: From Play Analysis to Sustainability Evaluation'. A Masterclass presented by Dr. Luca Guglielmetti from the University of Geneva.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Field Seminar
Ipoh, Malaysia
Friday, 26 November 2021, 8:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m.

Seri Iskander, Perak, Malaysia Optional Trip Date: 26 November, 2021 Time: To be determined View Information On CO₂ Laboratory Further details to come.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Workshop
Virtual Workshop
Tuesday, 23 November Thursday, 25 November 2021, 2:00 p.m.–5:45 p.m.

High CO2 fields and marginal fields (due to high levels of contaminants) are some of the challenges that are prevalent in the Asia Pacific petroleum industry. Join AAPG Asia Pacific for a 2-day workshop focused on best practices, risk-based planning and the role geoscientists and engineers will play in these changing times.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Online e-Symposium
Thursday, 11 February 2010, 12:00 a.m.–12:00 a.m.

Gas hydrates, ice-like substances composed of water and gas molecules (methane, ethane, propane, etc.), occur in permafrost areas and in deep water marine environments.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)

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