Asia Pacific Blog

Join us for this free webinar where Dr. Yong Li will discuss the Co-Occurrence of Multi Unconventional Natural Gases in Upper Paleozoic, Ordos Basin, China.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Explorer Division Column EMD

Happy new year to all Energy Minerals Division and AAPG members! T.S. Eliot wrote, “For last year’s words belong to last year’s language, and next year’s words await another voice. And to make an end is to make a beginning.” Therefore, I am focusing on the exciting future outlook in energy minerals and not dwelling on the past year that has been painful to many of us on a personal and professional level.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Explorer Article

As companies work toward developing alternative sources for a world with ever-increasing energy demands, energy minerals are moving to the forefront of the conversation. AAPG’s Energy Minerals Division finds itself in the spotlight these days for its work in prospecting alternative energy sources, such as geothermal and hydrates, for commercial use. “We’ve got good momentum right now with interest in alternative energy,” said Ursula Hammes, AAPG Member, EMD president and president at Hammes Energy and Consultants.

Show more
American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Explorer Division Column EMD

By the time you are reading this I hope you have attended your first virtual AAPG Annual Convention and Exhibition – ever! What a success it was, with up to 10 concurrent sessions including talks and posters. Our own Claudia Hackbarth and Mike Bingle-Davis chaired a session on the future of oil and gas and Bill Ambrose chaired one on expanding energy frontiers to Earth, the moon and Mars. A new format was offered with live presentations and interactive panels that were moderated and conducted by experts in their fields.

Show more
American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Explorer Division Column EMD

What’s in a name? Should we call it a transition? A convergence? A transformation? A revolution? A tipping-point? A paradigm shift? Consider that perhaps the name is largely irrelevant, except to sell conference tickets. There’s a radical shift afoot that affects the business model for global energy delivery and consumption. And with it comes with a wealth of opportunities for energy geoscientists, as well as an obligation for every professional society to help its members prepare for the future.

Show more
American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
EMD Blog

EMD is mapping a path to the future in Houston. Submit your abstract for an EMD session by September 26 for  ACE 2020. 

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
EMD Blog

Gas hydrate field production tests, laboratory studies, and computer modeling have documented the fact that gas hydrates hosted in sand-rich, conventional reservoirs systems, can occur at high concentrations and can be produced with conventional hydrocarbon production technologies.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Explorer Division Column EMD

Change is in the air. How will we choose to deal with it? We make choices every day, in our project work, our investments and our lifestyles. With so much in play, how do we select the right options? This challenge is particularly appropriate to discuss within the Energy Minerals Division, since our members are those in the AAPG who look beyond the conventional, the everyday and the familiar. We focus on opportunities outside of those in the traditional oil field to provide efficient and economic energy resources to the world.

Show more
American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Explorer Geophysical Corner

The Gulf of Mexico is one of the most prolific oil and gas basins in the world. Understandably, the region is also home to many deeply buried mature source rocks and migration pathways to the surface, which result in petroleum seepage on the seafloor. The emerging mineral-rich fluids invite microbes, mollusks and clam to feed on them, and these communities located around the seep locations form hard surfaces and appear to be different from the surrounding seafloor. Such hard surfaces are acoustically reflective and thus are detected by the technology available today.

Show more
American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Explorer Division Column EMD

Our industry has been through a lot of changes since 2000, due in no small part to the explosive growth in unconventional oil and gas. Petroleum geologists have had to adapt to this change by learning new skills to keep abreast of the technological changes required to explore and develop unconventional oil and gas resources.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Field Seminar
Ipoh, Malaysia
Thursday, 25 November 2021, 8:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m.

Date: 25 November, 2021 Time: To be determined View Information On CO2 Laboratory Further details to come.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Workshop
Virtual Workshop
Tuesday, 23 November Wednesday, 24 November 2021, 8:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m.

High CO2 fields and marginal fields (due to high levels of contaminants) are some of the challenges that are prevalent in the Asia Pacific petroleum industry. Join AAPG Asia Pacific for a 2-day workshop focused on best practices, risk-based planning and the role geoscientists and engineers will play in these changing times.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Field Seminar
Ipoh, Malaysia
Thursday, 25 November 2021, 8:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m.

Date: 25 November 2021 Time: To be determined Organized by: Southeast Asia Carbonate Research Laboratory, SEACARL, The Department of Geosciences, Faculty Fundamental Sciences, Information system Technology, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS. While AAPG and EAGE welcome this Field Trip in conjunction with our 2-day Geosciences Technology Workshop, all management and attending responsibilities will be taken care of by Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS. Further details to come.

Show more
American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)
Online e-Symposium
Thursday, 11 February 2010, 12:00 a.m.–12:00 a.m.

Gas hydrates, ice-like substances composed of water and gas molecules (methane, ethane, propane, etc.), occur in permafrost areas and in deep water marine environments.

American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG)

Committee

About Resource

Related Interests

See Also ...