Why DPA?

July 2016 By David J. Entzminger

Since being asked by Paul Britt to become a DPA councilor in 2009, I have been asking myself, "Why DPA?"

You may find this is an interesting question for someone that has been a Certified Geologist with AAPG since 1993.

We're sorry. This article is available only to AAPG members. To continue reading, please login or consider joining AAPG to gain access.

 

Who Should Attend
Objectives

In just three days, you will learn the fundamentals and language of petroleum geology, exploration, drilling and production. This understanding will enable you to communicate more efficiently and perform your job more effectively. The course introduces the tools and techniques that geologists and geophysicists use to locate gas and oil, that drillers use to drill the wells and that petroleum engineers use to test and complete the wells and produce the gas and oil. Exercises throughout the course provide practical experience in well log correlation, contouring, interpretation of surface and subsurface, contoured maps, seismic interpretation, well log interpretation, and decline curve analysis. You will learn how to identify the most common rocks and minerals. 

This course is extremely well illustrated with PowerPoint presentations and hands-on samples such as a drill bit, Landsat pictures, microfossils and crude oil specimens. Every student that completes this course will receive a certificate with the continuing education units on it. This course is approved continuing education units for landmen and accountants and for attorneys in most states. Please Note: Online Registration not available for this course through AAPG. 

Please contact AAPG Education Department directly at (918) 560-2650 or write for registration instructions.

Course Content

In taking this course, you will learn:

  1. How to Identify the most common rocks and minerals.
  2. The different types of crude oils and natural gasses and their measurements.
  3. The basic processes in the formation and deformation of sedimentary rocks.
  4. The formation of natural gas and crude oil.
  5. The occurrence and distribution of crude oil and natural gas.
  6. The characteristics of petroleum traps.
  7. The use of geological and seismic data in petroleum exploration.
  8. How to drill a well, the language, technique and equipment.
  9. How to test a well and qualitatively interpret well logs.
  10. How to complete a well, the language, techniques and equipment.
  11. The challenge of offshore exploration, drilling and production.
  12. How to produce crude oil and natural gas, calculate reserves, stimulate wells and improve oil recovery.
Field Seminar Location

The field trip will visit local outcrops of basaltic pillow lavas, seamounts, and feeder dykes and sills into an Oligocene carbonate shelf.

Features similar to those seen in outcrop can be observed in seismic sections and exploration wells offshore in the late Cretaceous and Tertiary Canterbury basin and so are representative of the effects of volcanism on the petroleum system.

The pyroclastic deposits around the seamounts may function either as reservoirs or as seals and their emplacement clearly affected the distribution of carbonate reservoir facies around the seamounts on and around the volcanic platform.

Local intrusions interact with carbonate minerals and seawater producing local to regional diagenetic changes possibly also affecting maturation.

Delegates will be taken to outcrop localities that will show all of these features.

This field trip is available exclusively as part of the Influence of Volcanism and Associated Magmatic Processes on Petroleum Systems GTW.

40 (x2)
Limit

Registration for the Field Trip is open only to GTW Delegates and should be made when registering for the Influence of Volcanism and Associated Magmatic Processes on Petroleum Systems GTW. Registration fee (when available) will encompass the Field Trip component; there will be no “workshop-only” fee should a delegate not attend the Field Trip.

 

Kari Bassett Sr. Lecturer in Sedimentology & Basin Analysis - University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand
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Adrienne Pereira Programs Manager, AAPG Asia Pacific Region +65 96536728
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Why DPA?

July 2016 By David J. Entzminger

Since being asked by Paul Britt to become a DPA councilor in 2009, I have been asking myself, "Why DPA?"

You may find this is an interesting question for someone that has been a Certified Geologist with AAPG since 1993.

We're sorry. This article is available only to AAPG members. To continue reading, please login or consider joining AAPG to gain access.

Why DPA?

July 2016 By David J. Entzminger

Since being asked by Paul Britt to become a DPA councilor in 2009, I have been asking myself, "Why DPA?"

You may find this is an interesting question for someone that has been a Certified Geologist with AAPG since 1993.

We're sorry. This article is available only to AAPG members. To continue reading, please login or consider joining AAPG to gain access.