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Abstract: North Atlantic extension and break-up: challenges, controversies and implications

The rifts systems bordering the North Atlantic house some of the world’s most prolific petroleum systems. Additionally, the region has been a testing ground for rift and continental margin models since the advent of plate tectonics.

The rifts systems bordering the North Atlantic house some of the world’s most prolific petroleum systems. Additionally, the region has been a testing ground for rift and continental margin models since the advent of plate tectonics. It contains abandoned and truncated rifts, hyperextended basins, magmatic and magma-poor continental margins and transform margins, many of which have become the global "type areas" for study. In this presentation, a career's experience in North Atlantic exploration will be harnessed to present a proposed sequential structural evolution for the region, on the way examining important concepts including:

  • Reactivation of old structures through time, from the "Wilson Cycle" to the smaller scale.
  • Fast and slow break-up, magmatic and magma-poor margins – how are they related?
  • Hyperextended basins – formation, characteristics and hydrocarbon implications.
  • The role of transform margins in North Atlantic development and petroleum geology.

These topics are all areas of uncertainty despite a huge body of research and significant exploration activity. The key controversies will be framed, recent ideas reviewed, answers suggested, and lively debate encouraged!

Distinguished Lecturer

Tony

Tony Doré

Europe Region

Video Presentation

Abstracts

  • 22979 The Arctic Ocean occupies a unique tectonic setting as a small, confined ocean between two much larger oceans - the subducting Pacific margin and the opening North Atlantic. Unlike many of the world's oceans, evidence on both timing and geometry is poor, and major elements of the plate tectonic evolution are still "up for grabs". The Arctic has experienced significant plate motion from Cretaceous to present, and because of the ambiguities in the oceanic signature, resolving the most likely kinematic history is critical in understanding paleogeography and hence reservoir and source distribution. I will show a 3-stage kinematic model which, while not a unique solution, seems to best satisfy the known constraints. The Arctic – a tectonic tour through the last great petroleum frontier http://www.aapg.org/career/training/in-person/distinguished-lecturer/abstract/Articleid/22979/the-arctic-–-a-tectonic-tour-through-the-last-great-petroleum-frontier
    The Arctic – a tectonic tour through the last great petroleum frontier

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