09 February, 2021

Natural Fracture Characterization for Basement and Carbonate Reservoir Exploration & Development

 

Hydrocarbons have been discovered in basement reservoirs with good production around the world over the past decades. The potential of fractured basement reservoirs is still significant, but often overlooked by explorers. This short course aims to address the major needs in fracture evaluation of basement reservoirs in the different phases of a field’s life.

Hydrocarbons have been discovered in basement reservoirs with good production around the world over the past decades. The potential of fractured basement reservoirs is still significant, but often overlooked by explorers. The volumes of hydrocarbons in fractured basements can be substantial; however, the ultimate recovery factor varies greatly from one reservoir to another. The common causes of a low recovery factor include a poor understanding fracture systems and characteristics of the basement, due to either lack of sufficient data or lack of expertise, meaning that insufficient information exists for successful well placement.

This short course aims to address the major needs in fracture evaluation of basement reservoirs in the different phases of a field’s life. All types of data that add value to fracture assessment, as well as data acquisition strategies, will be presented. Natural fracture interpretation techniques, along with examples, will be fully discussed. Case studies from Southeast Asia and other parts of the world will be examined. Exercises will be also given, allowing participants to gain practical interpretation skills. At the end of the course, attendees should expect to have a clear picture of data requirements and the techniques for properly characterizing natural fractures and faults, so that they will be better equipped with the knowledge and tools needed for successful drilling of more productive basement wells, thereby enhancing the hydrocarbon recovery factor in a basement field’s development.

Fracture characterization for carbonate reservoirs will be also covered in this short course with case studies to be presented.

Participants may expect to gain in-depth knowledge about natural fracture characterization using multiple data sets. Geoscientists who are involved in other types of naturally fractured reservoirs maybe also benefit from this course because the workflow, data requirements and technical solutions to be discussed will be also mostly applicable to other types of fractured reservoirs.