Bulletin Article

7965
 

Interpretation of seismic data from the Sorvestsnaget Basin, southwest Barents Sea, demonstrates gradual middle Eocene basin infilling (from the north) generated by southward-prograding shelf-margin clinoforms. The basin experienced continued accommodation development during the middle Eocene because of differential subsidence caused by the onset of early Eocene sea-floor spreading in the Norwegian-Greenland Sea, faulting, salt movement, and different tectonic activity between the Sorvestsnaget Basin and Veslemoy high. During this time, the margin shows transformation from an initially high-relief margin to a progradation in the final stage. The early stage of progradation is characterized by the establishment of generally oblique clinoform shifts creating a flat shelf-edge trajectory that implies a gentle falling or stable relative sea level and low accommodation-to-sediment supply ratio (lt1) in the topsets. During the early stage of basin development, the high-relief margin, narrow shelf, stable or falling relative sea level, seismicity, and presumably high sedimentation rate caused accumulation of thick and areally extensive deep-water fans. Seismic-scale sandstone injections deform the fans.

A fully prograding margin developed when the shelf-to-basin profile lowered, apparently because of increased subsidence of the northern part. This stage of the basin development is generally characterized by the presence of sigmoid clinoform shifts creating an ascending shelf-edge trajectory that is implying steady or rising relative sea level with an accommodation-to-sediment supply ratio of greater than 1, implying sand accumulation on the shelf. This study suggests that some volume of sand was transported into the deep water during relative sea level rise considering the narrow shelf and inferred high rates of sediment supply.

DL Abstract

3094
 
DL Abstract

When evaluating paleosystems, there will always be a shortage of data constraints and a surplus of plausible geological scenarios for a basin evaluation. Modelling paleosystems with constraints from the modern has been used as a successful approach to better understand petroleum systems.

3093
 
DL Abstract

As the cost of finding and extracting oil and gas rises, petroleum companies must increasingly resort to proprietary and custom technology to gain or maintain a competitive edge. In contrast, the data we purchase and human resources employed are shared throughout the industry.

Explorer Article

3166
 
Explorer Article

Discoveries were comparatively sparse, but they persisted steadily throughout the year. Here are some of the more significant discoveries of the past year.

3165
 
Explorer Article

A review of major oil and gas discoveries of 2013 shows a down year in terms of quantity—but that’s not the whole story.

Explorer Emphasis

8050
 

Seismic Outlook: After several years of plenty, 2014 is expected to be a comparatively lean year for the seismic industry, a few localized hot-spots around the world notwithstanding.

3794
 

Icebreaking vessels are the key to navigating the Arctic, and so are in high demand as oil producers set their sights on the vast oil reserves at the top of the world.

3792
 
Explorer Emphasis Article

Oil spills are a potential challenge in any corner of the world, but the Arctic brings its own set of challenges to oil production and transportation, and so it needs its own dedicated technologies for meeting them.

3790
 

Arctic pioneers will relate their lessons and experiences from exploring and producing in the frozen north at the third annual Arctic Technology Conference this month in Houston.

3789
 
Explorer Emphasis Article

The Final Frontier: The Arctic Circle’s vast, untapped treasures of oil and gas resources beckon explorers to boldly go, despite the daunting technical, political and environmental challenges.

Workshop

Oslo Norway 16 March, 2015 19 March, 2015 10890
 
Oslo, Norway
16-19 March 2015

Permanent Reservoir Monitoring, also known as Life-of-Field Seismic, using permanently installed seismic cables, has been characterized by a few key marker projects but did not reach mainstream status during its first ten years. However, since the start of its second decade we have witnessed a flurry of new projects and activity so far, both in the Americas (Brazil) and Europe (Norway). Within a time span of about three years, these efforts combined are already dwarfing the efforts of the first 10 years.

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