Bulletin Article

 

Interpretation of seismic data from the Sorvestsnaget Basin, southwest Barents Sea, demonstrates gradual middle Eocene basin infilling (from the north) generated by southward-prograding shelf-margin clinoforms. The basin experienced continued accommodation development during the middle Eocene because of differential subsidence caused by the onset of early Eocene sea-floor spreading in the Norwegian-Greenland Sea, faulting, salt movement, and different tectonic activity between the Sorvestsnaget Basin and Veslemoy high. During this time, the margin shows transformation from an initially high-relief margin to a progradation in the final stage. The early stage of progradation is characterized by the establishment of generally oblique clinoform shifts creating a flat shelf-edge trajectory that implies a gentle falling or stable relative sea level and low accommodation-to-sediment supply ratio (lt1) in the topsets. During the early stage of basin development, the high-relief margin, narrow shelf, stable or falling relative sea level, seismicity, and presumably high sedimentation rate caused accumulation of thick and areally extensive deep-water fans. Seismic-scale sandstone injections deform the fans.

A fully prograding margin developed when the shelf-to-basin profile lowered, apparently because of increased subsidence of the northern part. This stage of the basin development is generally characterized by the presence of sigmoid clinoform shifts creating an ascending shelf-edge trajectory that is implying steady or rising relative sea level with an accommodation-to-sediment supply ratio of greater than 1, implying sand accumulation on the shelf. This study suggests that some volume of sand was transported into the deep water during relative sea level rise considering the narrow shelf and inferred high rates of sediment supply.

Desktop /Portals/0/PackFlashItemImages/WebReady/evolution-of-shelf-margin-clinoforms-and.jpg?width=100&h=100&mode=crop&anchor=middlecenter&quality=75amp;encoder=freeimage&progressive=true 7965

Explorer Article

 

New technology, new science, new possibilities – all in a new location. There’s a lot that’s new waiting to be introduced at this year’s Arctic Technology Conference (ATC), a multidisciplinary meeting that offers the latest in Arctic exploration, development and production.

Desktop /Portals/0/PackFlashItemImages/WebReady/explorer-cover-2015-02feb.jpg?width=100&h=100&mode=crop&anchor=middlecenter&quality=75amp;encoder=freeimage&progressive=true 15727

Explorer Emphasis

 
Oil spills get a lot of media attention, but the best stories are about the disasters that didn’t happen.
Desktop /Portals/0/PackFlashItemImages/WebReady/shining-the-spotlight-on-oil-spill-prevention-hero.jpg?width=100&h=100&mode=crop&anchor=middlecenter&quality=75amp;encoder=freeimage&progressive=true 17201
 

Exploration and production in the Arctic is a proven difficult task – companies active there are all too familiar with its harsh conditions of ice, extreme low temperatures, long periods of winter darkness and remoteness. Consequently, providing safety to workers has become a major concern for companies braving this harsh territory.

Desktop /Portals/0/PackFlashItemImages/WebReady/changing-the-game-in-arctic-remote-health-care-hero.jpg?width=100&h=100&mode=crop&anchor=middlecenter&quality=75amp;encoder=freeimage&progressive=true 15851
 

In a paper to be presented at the upcoming Arctic Technology Conference, Fugro remote sensing manager Todd Mitchell discusses ways to better characterize the sensitive areas of the remote Arctic to help prepare for better disaster responses.

Desktop /Portals/0/PackFlashItemImages/WebReady/remote-sensing-for-cost-effective-mapping-hero.jpg?width=100&h=100&mode=crop&anchor=middlecenter&quality=75amp;encoder=freeimage&progressive=true 15837
 

Newfoundland-based GRI Simulations has logged innumerable hours working on its Virtual Arctic Simulation Environment to enable scientists to evaluate the perilous area from the comfort of their offices.

Desktop /Portals/0/PackFlashItemImages/WebReady/hamilton-matthew-2015-02feb.jpg?width=100&h=100&mode=crop&anchor=middlecenter&quality=75amp;encoder=freeimage&progressive=true 15833
 

Innumerable geoscientists worldwide are familiar with the AAPG Giant Oil Fields publications. These AAPG members are spearheading the effort to compile “Giant Oil and Gas Fields of the Decade 2000-2010” featuring papers covering fields in areas around the globe.

Desktop /Portals/0/PackFlashItemImages/WebReady/explorer-cover-2015-01jan.jpg?width=100&h=100&mode=crop&anchor=middlecenter&quality=75amp;encoder=freeimage&progressive=true 14053
 

Some highlights from international activity in 2014.

Desktop /Portals/0/PackFlashItemImages/WebReady/where-the-action-was-discovery-highlights-hero.jpg?width=100&h=100&mode=crop&anchor=middlecenter&quality=75amp;encoder=freeimage&progressive=true 14050
 

Seismic Outlook: After several years of plenty, 2014 is expected to be a comparatively lean year for the seismic industry, a few localized hot-spots around the world notwithstanding.

Desktop /Portals/0/PackFlashItemImages/WebReady/seismic-industry-tightens-its-belt-in-2014-hero.jpg?width=100&h=100&mode=crop&anchor=middlecenter&quality=75amp;encoder=freeimage&progressive=true 8050

Explorer Policy Watch

 

Commercial interest in the Arctic has grown with declines in summer sea ice cover – since 2007 the extent of Arctic sea ice has been significantly less than it was in the decade after satellite measurements started in 1978.

Desktop /Portals/0/PackFlashItemImages/WebReady/explorer-cover-2015-02feb.jpg?width=100&h=100&mode=crop&anchor=middlecenter&quality=75amp;encoder=freeimage&progressive=true 15858
Coming Soon

Check back often. "Find an Expert" feature is coming online soon!