Books Continue Legacy of AAPG

While checking on potential quotes for my column I was amazed at how many quotes were made about books. For example, Martin Luther said, “Every great book is an action and every great action is a book.”

Then there is a Chinese proverb that says, “A book is like a garden carried in your pocket.” I am not sure exactly what that means but I like it.

My favorite quote on books was by Lord Byron, who said, “A drop of ink will make a million think!”

That fits exactly with AAPG’s goal to disseminate science.

This year you will have a tremendous opportunity to examine a portion of the treasury of knowledge provided by some of the top geoscientists in the world. The following is a list with a brief description of four key special publications that will soon be available:

  • Advances in the Petroleum Geology of Mexico –Editors: Claudio Bartolini and J.R.R. Ramos (co-published with Repsol YPF and PEMEX).
  • This special publication contains 20 chapters covering onshore and offshore Mexican basins of the circum-Gulf of Mexico. Most of the chapters have a multidisciplinary approach, with special emphasis on hydrocarbon exploration and petroleum geology.
  • It is an incredible new look at the geology and petroleum potential of Mexico.
  • Natural Gas Hydrates – Energy Resource Potential and Associated Geologic Hazards– Editors: Tim Collete and Art Johnson, C. Knapp and R. Boswell (co-published with the U.S. Department of Energy, EMD and AAPG Foundation).
  • This title evolved from the results of an AAPG Hedberg conference. It is a comprehensive treatise containing 39 printed extended abstracts and 39 full papers on CD on the geology of gas hydrates, focusing on resource assessment along with other significant papers on gas hydrate related geologic hazards.
  • Oil Field Production Geology– Mike Shepherd.
  • This special publication is written for students, new professionals in oil companies and for anyone with an interest in reservoir geology.
  • Forty chapters explain the background to production geology in the context of oil field subsurface operations. It also gives practical guidelines as to how a production geologist can analyze the reservoir geology and fluid flow characteristics of an oil field with the aim of improving hydrocarbon recovery.
  • CO2 Sequestration in Geological Media – State of the Science– Editors: Matt Grobe, J.C. Pashin and R.L. Dodge (co-published with EMD, DEG, the Bureau of Economic Geology and the AAPG Foundation).
  • This is a comprehensive geological analysis of carbon sequestration. Its 43 chapters present a compilation of state of the science contributions from the international research community on the topic of carbon dioxide sequestration in geological media, also called geosequestration.

AAPG has a rich history of developing special publications. On the bookshelves in my office is a set of every AAPG special publication. The very first special pub is titled “Geology of Salt Dome Oil Fields,” by E. DeGolyer and “Others.” The second is titled “The Theory of Continental Drift,” by W.A.J.M. van Waterschoot van der Gracht, published in 1928! It is the results of an early AAPG “workshop.” Even in our early history our members were thinking outside the box.

The first publication on salt domes has some classic papers and a great forward by Wallace Pratt, who writes:

“Much of the speculation as to the origin of salt domes especially in America, appears to be unsound, and the error results from an inaccurate of distorted conception of the true form and character of our salt domes. It is hoped that with a more accurate, more detailed picture of American salt domes, such as this volume attempts to present, students of salt-dome origin may clarify and bring into accord their several theories.”

In his forward Pratt describes the goal of AAPG in developing special publications: We want to publish more so we ask all members to consider this opportunity to “clarify and bring into accord your several theories.”

Terri Olson is the chair of the Publications Committee, and they are constantly looking for new proposals for special pubs. You can send inquiries to Beverly Molyneux.

I am even getting into the act. Ten years ago the late Dr. James Lee Wilson, a Sidney Powers medalist, and I conspired to develop a comprehensive special publication on the Cambro-Ordovician carbonates of North America. As a memorial to Jim, his many friends, colleagues and students plan to have “The Great American Bank: The Geology and Petroleum Potential of the Cambro-Ordovician Sauk Sequence of Laurentia” to print this fall.


Sir Francis Bacon said, “Some books are to be tasted, others to be swallowed and some few to be chewed and digested.”

Now is the time to take a new look at AAPG special publications – at least for a taste.

Comments (0)

 

Director's Corner

Director's Corner - Rick Fritz
Richard D. “Rick” Fritz, an AAPG member since 1984 and a member of the Division of Environmental Geosciences and the Division of Professional Affairs, served as AAPG Executive Director from 1999 to 2011.

The Director's Corner covers Association news and industry events from the worldview perspective of the AAPG Executive Director.

View column archives

See Also: Bulletin Article

The Upper Jurassic Arab Formation in the Arabian Peninsula, the most prolific oil-bearing interval of the world, is a succession of interbedded thick carbonates and evaporites that are defined stratigraphically upsection as the Arab-D, Arab-C, Arab-B, and Arab-A. The Arab-D reservoir is the main reservoir in Khurais field, one of the largest onshore oil fields of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.

In Khurais field, the Arab-D reservoir is composed of the overlying evaporitic Arab-D Member of the Arab Formation and the underlying upper part of the Jubaila Formation. It contains 11 lithofacies, listed from deepest to shallowest: (1) hardground-capped skeletal wackestone and lime mudstone; (2) intraclast floatstone and rudstone; (3) pelletal wackestone and packstone; (4) stromatoporoid wackestone, packstone, and floatstone; (5) Cladocoropsis wackestone, packstone, and floatstone; (6) Clypeina and Thaumatoporella wackestone and packstone; (7) peloidal packstone and grainstone; (8) ooid grainstone; (9) crypt-microbial laminites; (10) evaporites; and (11) stratigraphically reoccurring dolomite.

The Arab-D reservoir lithofacies succession represents shallowing-upward deposition, which, from deepest to shallowest, reflects the following depositional environments: offshore submarine turbidity fans (lithofacies 1 and 2); lower shoreface settings (lithofacies 3); stromatoporoid reef (lithofacies 4); lagoon (lithofacies 5 and 6); shallow subtidal settings (lithofacies 7 and 8); peritidal settings (lithofacies 9); and sabkhas and salinas (lithofacies 10). The depositional succession of the reservoir represents a prograding, shallow-marine, reef-rimmed carbonate shelf that was subjected to common storm abrasion, which triggered turbidites.

Desktop /Portals/0/PackFlashItemImages/WebReady/arabian-carbonate-reservoirs-a-depositional-model.jpg?width=50&h=50&mode=crop&anchor=middlecenter&quality=90amp;encoder=freeimage&progressive=true 3771 Bulletin Article

The Marcellus Shale is considered to be the largest unconventional shale-gas resource in the United States. Two critical factors for unconventional shale reservoirs are the response of a unit to hydraulic fracture stimulation and gas content. The fracture attributes reflect the geomechanical properties of the rocks, which are partly related to rock mineralogy. The natural gas content of a shale reservoir rock is strongly linked to organic matter content, measured by total organic carbon (TOC). A mudstone lithofacies is a vertically and laterally continuous zone with similar mineral composition, rock geomechanical properties, and TOC content. Core, log, and seismic data were used to build a three-dimensional (3-D) mudrock lithofacies model from core to wells and, finally, to regional scale. An artificial neural network was used for lithofacies prediction. Eight petrophysical parameters derived from conventional logs were determined as critical inputs. Advanced logs, such as pulsed neutron spectroscopy, with log-determined mineral composition and TOC data were used to improve and confirm the quantitative relationship between conventional logs and lithofacies. Sequential indicator simulation performed well for 3-D modeling of Marcellus Shale lithofacies. The interplay of dilution by terrigenous detritus, organic matter productivity, and organic matter preservation and decomposition affected the distribution of Marcellus Shale lithofacies distribution, which may be attributed to water depth and the distance to shoreline. The trend of normalized average gas production rate from horizontal wells supported our approach to modeling Marcellus Shale lithofacies. The proposed 3-D modeling approach may be helpful for optimizing the design of horizontal well trajectories and hydraulic fracture stimulation strategies.

Desktop /Portals/0/PackFlashItemImages/WebReady/organic-rich-marcellus-shale-lithofacies-modeling.jpg?width=50&h=50&mode=crop&anchor=middlecenter&quality=90amp;encoder=freeimage&progressive=true 5725 Bulletin Article
We use samples from undeformed and deformed sandstones (single deformation band, deformation band cluster, slip-surface cataclasite, and fault core slip zone) to characterize their petrophysical properties (porosity, permeability, and capillary pressure). Relationships between permeability and porosity are described by power-law regressions where the power-law exponent (D) decreases with the increasing degree of deformation (strain) experienced by the sample from host rock (D, sim9) to fault core (D, sim5). The approaches introduced in this work will allow geologists to use permeability and/or porosity measurements to estimate the capillary pressures and sealing capacity of different fault-related rocks without requiring direct laboratory measurements of capillary pressure. Results show that fault core slip zones have the highest theoretical sealing capacity (gt140-m [459-ft] oil column in extreme cases), although our calculations suggest that deformation bands can locally act as efficiently as fault core slip zones in sealing nonwetting fluids (in this study, oil and CO2). Higher interfacial tension between brine and CO2 (because of the sensitivity of CO2 to temperature and pressure) results in higher capillary pressure and sealing capacity in a brine and CO2 system than a brine and oil system for the same samples.
Desktop /Portals/0/PackFlashItemImages/WebReady/insight-into-petrophysical-properties.jpg?width=50&h=50&mode=crop&anchor=middlecenter&quality=90amp;encoder=freeimage&progressive=true 3716 Bulletin Article

See Also: CD DVD

Desktop /Portals/0/images/_site/AAPG-newlogo-vertical-morepadding.jpg?width=50&h=50&mode=crop&anchor=middlecenter&quality=90amp;encoder=freeimage&progressive=true 4469 CD-DVD
Desktop /Portals/0/images/_site/AAPG-newlogo-vertical-morepadding.jpg?width=50&h=50&mode=crop&anchor=middlecenter&quality=90amp;encoder=freeimage&progressive=true 4311 CD-DVD