Books Continue Legacy of AAPG

While checking on potential quotes for my column I was amazed at how many quotes were made about books. For example, Martin Luther said, “Every great book is an action and every great action is a book.”

Then there is a Chinese proverb that says, “A book is like a garden carried in your pocket.” I am not sure exactly what that means but I like it.

My favorite quote on books was by Lord Byron, who said, “A drop of ink will make a million think!”

That fits exactly with AAPG’s goal to disseminate science.

This year you will have a tremendous opportunity to examine a portion of the treasury of knowledge provided by some of the top geoscientists in the world. The following is a list with a brief description of four key special publications that will soon be available:

  • Advances in the Petroleum Geology of Mexico –Editors: Claudio Bartolini and J.R.R. Ramos (co-published with Repsol YPF and PEMEX).
  • This special publication contains 20 chapters covering onshore and offshore Mexican basins of the circum-Gulf of Mexico. Most of the chapters have a multidisciplinary approach, with special emphasis on hydrocarbon exploration and petroleum geology.
  • It is an incredible new look at the geology and petroleum potential of Mexico.
  • Natural Gas Hydrates – Energy Resource Potential and Associated Geologic Hazards– Editors: Tim Collete and Art Johnson, C. Knapp and R. Boswell (co-published with the U.S. Department of Energy, EMD and AAPG Foundation).
  • This title evolved from the results of an AAPG Hedberg conference. It is a comprehensive treatise containing 39 printed extended abstracts and 39 full papers on CD on the geology of gas hydrates, focusing on resource assessment along with other significant papers on gas hydrate related geologic hazards.
  • Oil Field Production Geology– Mike Shepherd.
  • This special publication is written for students, new professionals in oil companies and for anyone with an interest in reservoir geology.
  • Forty chapters explain the background to production geology in the context of oil field subsurface operations. It also gives practical guidelines as to how a production geologist can analyze the reservoir geology and fluid flow characteristics of an oil field with the aim of improving hydrocarbon recovery.
  • CO2 Sequestration in Geological Media – State of the Science– Editors: Matt Grobe, J.C. Pashin and R.L. Dodge (co-published with EMD, DEG, the Bureau of Economic Geology and the AAPG Foundation).
  • This is a comprehensive geological analysis of carbon sequestration. Its 43 chapters present a compilation of state of the science contributions from the international research community on the topic of carbon dioxide sequestration in geological media, also called geosequestration.

AAPG has a rich history of developing special publications. On the bookshelves in my office is a set of every AAPG special publication. The very first special pub is titled “Geology of Salt Dome Oil Fields,” by E. DeGolyer and “Others.” The second is titled “The Theory of Continental Drift,” by W.A.J.M. van Waterschoot van der Gracht, published in 1928! It is the results of an early AAPG “workshop.” Even in our early history our members were thinking outside the box.

The first publication on salt domes has some classic papers and a great forward by Wallace Pratt, who writes:

“Much of the speculation as to the origin of salt domes especially in America, appears to be unsound, and the error results from an inaccurate of distorted conception of the true form and character of our salt domes. It is hoped that with a more accurate, more detailed picture of American salt domes, such as this volume attempts to present, students of salt-dome origin may clarify and bring into accord their several theories.”

In his forward Pratt describes the goal of AAPG in developing special publications: We want to publish more so we ask all members to consider this opportunity to “clarify and bring into accord your several theories.”

Terri Olson is the chair of the Publications Committee, and they are constantly looking for new proposals for special pubs. You can send inquiries to Beverly Molyneux.

I am even getting into the act. Ten years ago the late Dr. James Lee Wilson, a Sidney Powers medalist, and I conspired to develop a comprehensive special publication on the Cambro-Ordovician carbonates of North America. As a memorial to Jim, his many friends, colleagues and students plan to have “The Great American Bank: The Geology and Petroleum Potential of the Cambro-Ordovician Sauk Sequence of Laurentia” to print this fall.


Sir Francis Bacon said, “Some books are to be tasted, others to be swallowed and some few to be chewed and digested.”

Now is the time to take a new look at AAPG special publications – at least for a taste.

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Director's Corner

Director's Corner - Rick Fritz
Richard D. “Rick” Fritz, an AAPG member since 1984 and a member of the Division of Environmental Geosciences and the Division of Professional Affairs, served as AAPG Executive Director from 1999 to 2011.

The Director's Corner covers Association news and industry events from the worldview perspective of the AAPG Executive Director.

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See Also: Book

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See Also: Bulletin Article

A new hierarchical architectural classification for clastic marginal-marine depositional systems is presented and illustrated with examples. In ancient rocks, the architectural scheme effectively integrates the scales of sedimentology (core, outcrop) and sequence stratigraphy (wireline-log correlation, reflection seismic). The classification also applies to modern sediments, which allows for direct comparison of architectural units between modern and ancient settings. In marginal-marine systems, the parasequence typically defines reservoir flow units. This classification addresses subparasequence scales of stratigraphy that commonly control fluid flow in these reservoirs. The scheme consists of seven types of architectural units that are placed on five architectural hierarchy levels: hierarchy level I: element (E) and element set (ES); hierarchy level II: element complex (EC) and element complex set (ECS); hierarchy level III: element complex assemblage (ECA); hierarchy level IV: element complex assemblage set (ECAS); and hierarchy level V: transgressive-regressive sequence (T-R sequence). Architectural units in levels I to III are further classified relative to dominant depositional processes (wave, tide, and fluvial) acting at the time of deposition. All architectural units are three-dimensional and can also be expressed in terms of plan-view and cross-sectional geometries. Architectural units can be linked using tree data structures by a set of familial relationships (parent-child, siblings, and cousins), which provides a novel mechanism for managing uncertainty in marginal-marine systems. Using a hierarchical scheme permits classification of different data types at the most appropriate architectural scale. The use of the classification is illustrated in ancient settings by an outcrop and subsurface example from the Campanian Bearpaw–Horseshoe Canyon Formations transition, Alberta, Canada, and in modern settings, by the Mitchell River Delta, northern Australia. The case studies illustrate how the new classification can be used across both modern and ancient systems, in complicated, mixed-process depositional environments.
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See Also: DL Abstract

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See Also: Field Seminar

The seminar focuses on the lithologic variations that characterize clastic reservoir facies and on development of models that can be used to predict these variations in the subsurface.

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See Also: Map

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