Foundation Update: An Active Month

Eddie David
Eddie David

A new AAPG Foundation named grant was established, a major new pledge was received and a new “legacy” program was created during an active month for the AAPG Foundation.

The new named grant was established by the Pittsburgh Association of Petroleum Geologists (PAPG) – a $500 annual award that will be distributed through the AAPG Grants-in-Aid program.

The PAPG grant will be restricted to a student enrolled at a college or university in the Appalachian Basin area and whose research includes Appalachian Basin geology.

Past AAPG president, Honorary member and Trustee Associate Edward K. David has pledged $100,000 to the Foundation’s “Meeting Challenges Assuring Success” campaign – with efforts to raise $100,000 through matching gifts.

When fully funded, David’s gift will provide an annual Eddie David Named Grant through the Foundation’s Grants-in-Aid program and an annual grant to support the George B. Asquith Scholarship for Excellence in Petroleum Geology at Texas Tech University.

Members are encouraged to join David’s effort to provide funding for geoscience students.

The AAPG Foundation provided $20,000 to the Kansas State University Foundation in support of the Paul and Deana Strunk Geology Fellowship (made possible by a generous donation from Trustee Associate Paul Strunk).

Finally, Foundation Chairman William Fisher announced creation of the “Legacy Circle” to honor and recognize members who want to further their generosity in support of the Foundation’s mission through a lasting gift indicated in their will.

Membership in the “Legacy Circle” will be announced in the Foundation’s annual report; donor preferences regarding the bequest and all information will be held in the utmost confidence.

For information on this and all Foundation programs contact the AAPG Foundation at (918) 560-2644.

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Foundation Update

Rebecca Griffin worked as the AAPG Foundation manager until October 2010.

Foundation Update

Foundation Update is a regular column in the EXPLORER offering news about the AAPG Foundation’s latest activities. For more information about the AAPG Foundation, visit the Foundation website, email, or call (918) 560-2644.

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