AAPG’s Publishing Legacy Adds New Chapters

AAPG is a science publisher. It’s a tradition that dates back to our founding. And our flagship journal, the BULLETIN, and our special publications are usually a core part of a petroleum geoscientist’s professional library.

Last month was a big one for AAPG science publishing.

AAPG’s associate editors were invited by Elected Editor Steve Laubach to gather in Houston on Feb. 4 to discuss improvements to the BULLETIN’s editorial process, select publication awards and talk about developing a short course for aspiring young authors.

That evening the attendees were inducted into the Charles Taylor Fellowship. The fellowship, named after the BULLETIN’s first editor, Charles H. Taylor, was established by AAPG’s Executive Committee to recognize the vital contributions that all current and former associate editors have made to ensuring that AAPG maintains high standards of published science.

Then on Feb. 7, at a meeting convened by AAPG President Ted Beaumont and SEG President David Monk, my SEG counterpart Steven Davis and I signed a memorandum of understanding for AAPG to join as a partner in the new journal Interpretation.

Interpretation, launched by SEG late last year, is a peer-reviewed quarterly designed to publish papers on the science and practice of interpreting data to better understand Earth’s subsurface, particularly as it relates to the exploration and extraction of resources and for environmental and engineering applications.

This journal fills an important space in science publishing and our participation is the outgrowth of an enhanced and evolving partnership with SEG.

Finally, last month marked the launch of a new BULLETIN feature.

Editor Laubach has been working closely with Beverly Molyneaux, AAPG’s managing editor of technical publications, and Geoscience Director Jim Blankenship to ensure that BULLETIN authors’ manuscripts are published as quickly as possible.

The result is a new website for the BULLETIN and a new feature called Ahead of Print . There you will find manuscripts that have been peer-reviewed and accepted for publication, but have not yet gone through the lay-out and production process.

Ahead of Print gives our members and subscribers the ability to access AAPG science as soon as it’s accepted. This benefits users and is an important step in attracting authors to publish in the BULLETIN.

Ensuring that AAPG remains a relevant and successful science publisher is vital to our long-term objectives. Last month’s activities build upon a strong foundation and position us for the future.

And there are further improvements to come.

I’d like to leave you with one more thought:

Most of us are consumers of the science information published by AAPG. We sift through the online BULLETIN archives and Search and Discovery for papers or presentations that will help us better understand an exploration concept or the geology of a particular region.

That’s great! That’s what these resources are meant to do – to help you do your job better.

But those papers and presentations are only there because someone took the time – usually personal time – to put words on paper, to draft figures and to edit and revise. They probably didn’t do it for fame and fortune (although I wouldn’t dismiss the possibility). Instead they likely saw this contribution as a way to improve their own understanding, to enhance their professional standing and to step into the role of teacher, contributing to the scientific discourse.

They decided to become active participants in advancing our science.

What paper or presentation is locked inside you?

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Director's Corner

Director's Corner - David Curtiss

David Curtiss is an AAPG member and was named AAPG Executive Director in August 2011. He was previously Director of the AAPG GEO-DC Office in Washington D.C.

The Director's Corner covers Association news and industry events from the worldview perspective of the AAPG Executive Director.

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Thirty-seven mudstone samples were collected from the uppermost Lower Mudstone Member of the Potrerillos Formation in El Gordo minibasin within La Popa Basin, Mexico. The unit is exposed in a circular pattern at the earth's surface and is intersected by El Gordo diapir in the northeast part of the minibasin. Vitrinite reflectance (Ro) results show that samples along the eastern side of the minibasin (i.e., south of the diapir) are mostly thermally immature to low maturity (Ro ranges from 0.53% to 0.64%). Vitrinite values along the southern, western, and northwestern part of the minibasin range between 0.67% and 0.85%. Values of Ro immediately northwest of the diapir are the highest, reaching a maximum of 1.44%. The results are consistent with two different possibilities: (1) that the diapir plunges to the northwest, or (2) that a focused high-temperature heat flow existed along just the northwest margin of the diapir. If the plunging diapir interpretation is correct, then the thermally immature area south of the diapir was in a subsalt position, and the high-maturity area northwest of the diapir was in a suprasalt position prior to Tertiary uplift and erosion. If a presumed salt source at depth to the northwest of El Gordo also fed El Papalote diapir, which is located just to the north of El Gordo diapir, then the tabular halokinetic sequences that are found only along the east side of El Papalote may be subsalt features. However, if the diapir is subvertical and the high-maturity values northwest of the diapir are caused by prolonged, high-temperature fluid flow along just the northwestern margin of the diapir, then both of these scenarios are in disagreement with previously published numerical models. This disagreement arises because the models predict that thermal anomalies will extend outward from a diapir a distance roughly 1.5 times the radius of the diapir, but the results reported here show that the anomalous values on one side of the diapir are about two times the radius, whereas they are as much as five times the radius on the other side of the diapir. The results indicate that strata adjacent to salt margins may experience significantly different heat histories adjacent to different margins of diapirs that result in strikingly different diagenetic histories, even at the same depth.
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