ACE 2011 – Disseminating the Science

Networking potential is always high at the AAPG Annual Convention and Exhibition.
Networking potential is always high at the AAPG Annual Convention and Exhibition.

Science is the heartbeat of AAPG. It is the key for innovation in our industry, and AAPG is dedicated to finding new scientific developments and related new technologies.

Once again it’s time to disseminate science at ACE –AAPG’s Annual Convention and Exhibition, and as usual, meeting along with SEPM. Once again the meeting is in Houston, and the meeting’s theme is fitting for the locale: “Making the Next Giant Leap in Geoscience.”

It will be held April 10-13.

Thousands of geoscientists, engineers, managers, professors, producers, teachers and students will be coming to share their findings and explore new ideas. With more than 400 oral presentations and more than 400 full-day posters, the technical program is the heart of the ACE.

There are 11 themes this year – and as you can see, there is something for everybody:

  • Molecules to Marketplace: The Business of Energy.
  • Global Deepwater Reservoirs: Giant Leaps in E&P.
  • Worldwide E&P: Opportunities in the New Decade.
  • Challenged Resource Frontiers.
  • Mudstones and Shales: Unlocking the Promise.
  • Siliciclastics: Advancing Research to Resource.
  • Insight into Carbonates and Evaporites.
  • Breakthroughs: Tectonics, Salt and Basin Analysis.
  • Integrating New Technology, Geophysics and Subsurface Data.
  • Energy and Environmental Horizons.
  • The Next Geo-Generation: Who, What and Where.

In addition to the technical program, one of my favorite places is the exhibit hall. Houston always has a great exhibition, and this year will be no exception. It is one of the best places to network while exploring new technology.

Of course, there are many ancillary activities at the convention – field trips, short courses, student activities, luncheons, forums, panels, special sessions, committee meetings, spouse activities and entertainment.

Some of the highlights include the opening session and awards ceremony on Sunday, April 10, from 4-5 p.m. in the George R. Brown Convention Center. If you have not attended the opening session lately, now is the time to enjoy an exciting program, which includes a keynote speech by AAPG President Dave Rensink.

The opening session is a great opportunity to recognize the great scientists and leaders of AAPG.

On Monday, April 11 there will be a special All-Convention Luncheon featuring four NASA astronauts, as well as one of my favorite programs – the Discovery Thinking Forum, which this year will feature five top executives discussing their success exploring for and finding hydrocarbons.

There also are numerous events for students and young professionals. One of the member’s favorites is the student reception on Monday night, when awards are provided for best student paper and poster and the winners of the Imperial Barrel Award (IBA) competition are announced.

It is important to thank the members and staff who work tirelessly to make a great program at ACE. We also thank all of the sponsors who help make ACE a reality at a reasonable cost.

I have attended every ACE since 1977, through good times and hard times. I always found it well worth the trip.

Please come and join us in Houston.

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Director's Corner

Director's Corner - Rick Fritz
Richard D. “Rick” Fritz, an AAPG member since 1984 and a member of the Division of Environmental Geosciences and the Division of Professional Affairs, served as AAPG Executive Director from 1999 to 2011.

The Director's Corner covers Association news and industry events from the worldview perspective of the AAPG Executive Director.

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