Rocky Mountain, Eastern Section Meetings Set This Month

September will be a busy month for the AAPG Sections – two groups will be holding their annual meetings, both in locales that boast geologic industry history and plenty of entertainment opportunities.

Rocky Mountain Section Annual Meeting

Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper, a former oilman and current member of AAPG, will be the All-Convention luncheon speaker at this year’s Rocky Mountain Section meeting, set Sept. 9-12 at the Two Rivers Convention Center in Grand Junction, Colo.

It is the first time Grand Junction has hosted the annual RMS event.

The meeting theme is “Vintage Geology – Perfectly Aged,” and the technical sessions will include updates on the most recent work on resource plays across the region, the sedimentary and structural architecture of the latest plays in the Rockies and the impact and future of energy minerals.

Some of the specific session topics are:

  • New Ideas in Piceance Creek and Uinta Basins.
  • Resource Plays – Exploration and Exploitation.
  • Tight Oil and Gas Reservoirs – Where, How and Why?
  • Colorado Plateau Geology and Paleontology: A Tribute to

Robert G. Young.

The All-Convention luncheon will begin at 11:45 a.m. on Monday, Sept. 10.


Eastern Section Annual Meeting

The Eastern Section’s 41st annual meeting returns to Cleveland, the site of the Section’s very first meeting, Cleveland, for a gathering built on the theme “Classic Rocks – 153 Years of Performance.”

The meeting will be held Sept. 22-26, and the technical program offers short courses, field trips and a technical program that centers on the Section’s four major basins.

Technical sessions will include:

  • Case Histories and Development of the Marcellus Shale Reservoirs.
  • Horizontal Wells: Design, Drilling, Completion and Fracturing Techniques.
  • Regional Geologic Concepts and new Plays in the Appalachian and Illinois Basin.
  • Trenton-Black River Exploration and Production in Michigan and Indiana.
  • Exploration and Production of Shale Source/Reservoir Rocks.

Entertainment at the meeting includes a night at the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame, with full access to the museum.

Comments (0)

 

Regions and Sections

Regions and Sections Column - Carol McGowen
Carol Cain McGowen is the development manager for AAPG's Regions and Sections. She may be contacted via email , or telephone at 1-918-560-9403.

Regions and Sections Column

Regions and Sections is a regular column in the EXPLORER offering news for and about AAPG's six international Regions and six U.S. Sections. News items, press releases and other information should be submitted via email or to: EXPLORER - Regions and Sections, P.O. Box 979, Tulsa, OK 74101. 

View column archives

See Also: Book

Desktop /Portals/0/images/_site/AAPG-newlogo-vertical-morepadding.jpg?width=50&h=50&mode=crop&anchor=middlecenter&quality=90amp;encoder=freeimage&progressive=true 4090 Book

See Also: Bulletin Article

We reviewed the tectonostratigraphic evolution of the Jurassic–Cenozoic collision between the North American and the Caribbean plate using more than 30,000 km (18,641 mi) of regional two-dimensional (2-D) academic seismic lines and Deep Sea Drilling Project wells of Leg 77. The main objective is to perform one-dimensional subsidence analysis and 2-D flexural modeling to better understand how the Caribbean collision may have controlled the stratigraphic evolution of the offshore Cuba region.

Five main tectonic phases previously proposed were recognized: (1) Late Triassic–Jurassic rifting between South and North America that led to the formation of the proto-Caribbean plate; this event is interpreted as half grabens controlled by fault family 1 as the east-northeast–south-southwest–striking faults; (2) Middle–Late Jurassic anticlockwise rotation of the Yucatan block and formation of the Gulf of Mexico; this event resulted in north-northwest–south-southeast–striking faults of fault family 2 controlling half-graben structures; (3) Early Cretaceous passive margin development characterized by carbonate sedimentation; sedimentation was controlled by normal subsidence and eustatic changes, and because of high eustatic seas during the Late Cretaceous, the carbonate platform drowned; (4) Late Cretaceous–Paleogene collision between the Caribbean plate, resulting in the Cuban fold and thrust belt province, the foreland basin province, and the platform margin province; the platform margin province represents the submerged paleoforebulge, which was formed as a flexural response to the tectonic load of the Great Arc of the Caribbean during initial Late Cretaceous–Paleocene collision and foreland basin development that was subsequently submerged during the Eocene to the present water depths as the arc tectonic load reached the maximum collision; and (5) Late Cenozoic large deep-sea erosional features and constructional sediment drifts related to the formation of the Oligocene–Holocene Loop Current–Gulf Stream that flows from the northern Caribbean into the Straits of Florida and to the north Atlantic.

Desktop /Portals/0/PackFlashItemImages/WebReady/Subsidence-controls-on-foreland-basin.jpg?width=50&h=50&mode=crop&anchor=middlecenter&quality=90amp;encoder=freeimage&progressive=true 3526 Bulletin Article

See Also: CD DVD

Desktop /Portals/0/images/_site/AAPG-newlogo-vertical-morepadding.jpg?width=50&h=50&mode=crop&anchor=middlecenter&quality=90amp;encoder=freeimage&progressive=true 4115 CD-DVD

See Also: Energy Policy Blog

18 percent of AAPG members are women, up from 10 percent in 2006.

Desktop /Portals/0/PackFlashItemImages/WebReady/future-oil-and-gas-opportunities-for-women-and-minorities-2014-04apr-16-hero.jpg?width=50&h=50&mode=crop&anchor=middlecenter&quality=90amp;encoder=freeimage&progressive=true 12894 Energy Policy Blog

See Also: Field Seminar

This four-day field trip will begin with a drive from Denver to Glenwood Springs and a road log describing the general geology along Interstate 70 (I-70), as well as an overview stop in Rifle to introduce the Wasatch and Green River systems. It will focus on two themes: observing the characteristics of a wide variety of sedimentary environments and comparing these with subsurface data.

Desktop /Portals/0/PackFlashItemImages/WebReady/ace2015-ft-08-hero.jpg?width=50&h=50&mode=crop&anchor=middlecenter&quality=90amp;encoder=freeimage&progressive=true 14687 Field Seminar