Foundation Update

The AAPG Foundation will be well represented next month at the AAPG Annual Convention and Exhibition in Long Beach, Calif.

  • The Members of the Corporation will meet during the convention, as well as the Trustee Board.
  • Trustee Associates and a select number of Foundation supporters are invited to the Chairmen’s Reception, hosted by Foundation Trustee Chair Bill Fisher and Don O’Nesky, the Trustee Associate chair.
  • Lastly, the new Fundraising Advisory Committee will meet for the first time and discuss a new post-campaign fundraising strategy, under the volunteer leadership of Rick Fritz.

The James E. Hartman Student Leadership Summit Fund now exceeds $600,000, thanks to the generosity of Mr. Hartman. Because of his dedication to students studying geology, many new leaders will emerge for years to come.

A brand new initiative begins in the fall to enable students to develop their leadership skills.

If you have a passion to support future generations, add your contributions to the James E. Hartman Student Leadership Summit Fund.


The Foundation’s Trustee Associates continue to provide strong financial support, and are pleased to welcome the following new members: Pete Stark, John Dolson, Rita Monahan, James Painter, Terry Mather, Martin Shields, Larry and Barbara Meckel, Annell Bay and Loren Leiker.


The AAPG Foundation is pleased to announce that Marathon Oil Corporation has endowed two GIS-UDRIL digital subscriptions: University of Texas at Austin and the University of Kansas.

Marathon also pledged to endow eight more subscriptions in the next four years. Many thanks to Annell Bay and Paul Weeditz for making that gift happen!

Paul Buckthal of Amarillo, Texas, has endowed a University Subscription and GIS-UDRIL digital subscription for the University of New Mexico in memory of his wife, Natalie Henkes Buckthal, and in honor of his grand-daughter, Natalie Heberling, who attends that university.


A recent Visiting Geoscientist Program visit was made to Bahria University-Islamabad by Nadeem Ahmad, with the topic of “Seismic Stratigraphy as a Tool for Enhanced Exploration of Stratigraphic Traps.”

Ahmad’s visit has encouraged many students to apply for AAPG membership and the students there are looking to create an AAPG Student Chapter in the near future.

The AAPG Foundation would like to thank Tako Koning for his generous support of the Visiting Geoscientists Program.


Does your company match your giving?

More than $6,600 contributions came in the last two months from corporate matching gifts.

It’s easy to find out if your company matches charitable contributions. The Foundation staff would be happy to help you double your gift!


We are sorry to learn of the passing of Trustee Associates James Harrison Davis, of Houston, on Dec. 3, 2011 and Mark Dale Wilson, of Midland, Texas, on Dec. 9, 2011.

Davis had been a Trustee Associate since 1984; Wilson had been a Trustee Associate since 2001.

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Division Column-DEG Jeffrey Paine

Jeffrey Paine is DEG President for 2014-15.

Foundation Update

Foundation Update - Natalie Adams

Natalie Adams served as the AAPG Foundation manager from October 2010 through April 2014.

Division Column-DEG David Vance

David Vance is principal scientist, ARCADIS-US Inc., Midland, Texas, and is a member of the DEG CO2 Sequestration Committee.  

Division Column-DEG Tom J. Temples

Tom J. Temples is DEG President.

Division Column-DEG Bruce Smith

Bruce Smith is a DEG member and is with the Crustal Geophysics and Geochemistry Science Center of the U.S. Geological Survey in Denver.

Division Column-DEG Doug Wyatt

Doug Wyatt, of Aiken, S.C., is director of science research for the URS Corporation Research and Engineering Services contract to the USDOE National Energy Technology Laboratory. He also is a member of the DEG Advisory Board for the AAPG Eastern Section.

Foundation Update

Foundation Update is a regular column in the EXPLORER offering news about the AAPG Foundation’s latest activities. For more information about the AAPG Foundation, visit the Foundation website, email, or call (918) 560-2644.

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See Also: Book

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See Also: Bulletin Article

A new hierarchical architectural classification for clastic marginal-marine depositional systems is presented and illustrated with examples. In ancient rocks, the architectural scheme effectively integrates the scales of sedimentology (core, outcrop) and sequence stratigraphy (wireline-log correlation, reflection seismic). The classification also applies to modern sediments, which allows for direct comparison of architectural units between modern and ancient settings. In marginal-marine systems, the parasequence typically defines reservoir flow units. This classification addresses subparasequence scales of stratigraphy that commonly control fluid flow in these reservoirs. The scheme consists of seven types of architectural units that are placed on five architectural hierarchy levels: hierarchy level I: element (E) and element set (ES); hierarchy level II: element complex (EC) and element complex set (ECS); hierarchy level III: element complex assemblage (ECA); hierarchy level IV: element complex assemblage set (ECAS); and hierarchy level V: transgressive-regressive sequence (T-R sequence). Architectural units in levels I to III are further classified relative to dominant depositional processes (wave, tide, and fluvial) acting at the time of deposition. All architectural units are three-dimensional and can also be expressed in terms of plan-view and cross-sectional geometries. Architectural units can be linked using tree data structures by a set of familial relationships (parent-child, siblings, and cousins), which provides a novel mechanism for managing uncertainty in marginal-marine systems. Using a hierarchical scheme permits classification of different data types at the most appropriate architectural scale. The use of the classification is illustrated in ancient settings by an outcrop and subsurface example from the Campanian Bearpaw–Horseshoe Canyon Formations transition, Alberta, Canada, and in modern settings, by the Mitchell River Delta, northern Australia. The case studies illustrate how the new classification can be used across both modern and ancient systems, in complicated, mixed-process depositional environments.
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A three-dimensional seismic data set and published data from exploration wells were used to reconstruct the tectonostratigraphic evolution of the Mandal High area, southern North Sea, Norway. The Mandal High is an elongated southeast-northwest–trending horst. Three fault families in the Lower Permian sequence, inherited from the basement structural grain of Caledonian origin, are interpreted: (1) a north-northwest–south-southeast–striking fault family, (2) a northeast-southwest–striking fault family, and (3) a near east-west–striking fault family. In addition, an east-southeast–west-northwest–striking fault family (4) that formed during Late Jurassic rifting and was reverse reactivated in the Late Cretaceous is interpreted. We suggest that inversion occurred because of small dextral motion along fault family 1. A final fault family (5) displays various strike orientations and is associated with salt movements.

Seven chronostratigraphic sequences defined by well data and recognized on three-dimensional seismic data are interpreted and mapped: Early Permian rifting in a continental environment; Late Permian deposition of the Zechstein salt and flooding; Triassic continental rifting; uplift and erosion in the Middle Jurassic with deposition of shallow-marine and deltaic sediments; rifting and transgression in a deep-marine environment during the Late Jurassic; a post-rift phase in a marine environment during the Early Cretaceous; and flooding and deposition of the Chalk Group in the Late Cretaceous. An eighth sequence was interpreted—Paleogene–Neogene—but has not been studied in detail. This sequence is dominated by progradation from the east and basin subsidence. Well and seismic data over the Mandal High reveal that large parts of the high were subaerially exposed from Late Permian to Late Jurassic or Early Cretaceous, providing a local source of sediments for adjacent basins.

Similar to the Utsira High, where several large hydrocarbon discoveries have been recently seen, the Mandal High might consist of a set of petroleum plays, including fractured crystalline basement and shallow-marine systems along the flanks of the high, thereby opening up future exploration opportunities.

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See Also: DL Abstract

Assets within the Appalachian Basin range from conventional clastic and carbonate reservoirs to source rocks of Devonian black shale and Pennsylvanian coal, all of which are fractured.

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See Also: Online e Symposium

Effective hydraulic fracture stimulation is critical for shale development, and microseismic is the only technology able to map the growth of these hydraulic fracture networks.

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