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The AAPG Foundation’s L. Austin Weeks Undergraduate Grant program annually awards deserving geoscience students and geoscience student organizations across the world with $500 in grant funds. These international grants support the educational expenses of undergraduate geoscience students and their associated student organizations.

The Geoscience Student Club at the ENSEGID School of Bordeaux. Photo courtesy of ENSEGID School of Bordeaux
The Geoscience Student Club at the ENSEGID School of Bordeaux. Photo courtesy of ENSEGID School of Bordeaux

In 2015 the program was expanded to accept applications from individual students, student-led geoscience associations and clubs in addition to applications from AAPG student chapters.

The response was tremendous.

The applications far exceeded the total number of awards available. The Foundation received more than 350 applications–255 from students and 95 from student organizations. This year the number of awards available totaled 152 grants. The proportion of awards was split equally between individual students and student organizations.

This year the student and organization applications were reviewed by a selection panel composed of AAPG trustee associates including Denise Cox, Jim McGhay, Ron Nelson, Steve Laubach and Valary Schulz-West. The award criteria focused on students and student organizations’ scholastic performance, intended use, and leadership activity. Each winning student and student organization received $500 in grant funds.

Award-winning students may use the grants to purchase much needed equipment required for hands-on exploration, such as rock hammers and compasses, also and are able to apply the funds toward tuition, books and fees. Student organizations may use the funds to support group activities through the purchase of necessary field equipment and are able also to apply the funds towards geology field trips and conferences.

The increased interest from this year’s grant cycle shows a need for greater funding in the area of undergraduate geoscience education. We know that the financial need will continue to grow and we hope the results from this award cycle highlight the necessity to focus fundraising efforts for undergraduate geoscience education across the world.

Thanks to the expansion of the program, one geoscience club hopes to build an official AAPG Student Chapter at ENSEGID School of Bordeaux (France). Student representative Armand Moreau wrote in a thank you letter to the Foundation:

“The Geoscience Student Club at the ENSEGID School of Bordeaux (France) is thrilled and proud to have received the L. Austin Weeks Undergraduate Grant from the AAPG Foundation.

“We would like to thank the different contributors and the members of the Foundation for this grant and for their trust in our association. This money will help us to organize geological field trips during the coming year, a great opportunity to gain more knowledge and experience in the field.

“We are now even more motivated to build an official AAPG Student Chapter in our school, which will allow us to bring together all the geological students of Bordeaux and to organe more events, conferences and field trips. This is our next step!”

If you are interested in volunteering for the L. Austin Weeks Undergraduate Grant Committee to help select student recipients, or in making a contribution to support the program, please contact Foundation program coordinator, April Stuart, or (918) 560-2664.

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Alternative Resources, Structure, Geochemistry and Basin Modeling, Sedimentology and Stratigraphy, Geophysics, Business and Economics, Engineering, Petrophysics and Well Logs, Environmental, Geomechanics and Fracture Analysis, Compressional Systems, Salt Tectonics, Tectonics (General), Extensional Systems, Fold and Thrust Belts, Structural Analysis (Other), Basin Modeling, Source Rock, Migration, Petroleum Systems, Thermal History, Oil Seeps, Oil and Gas Analysis, Maturation, Sequence Stratigraphy, Clastics, Carbonates, Evaporites, Seismic, Gravity, Magnetic, Direct Hydrocarbon Indicators, Resource Estimates, Reserve Estimation, Risk Analysis, Economics, Reservoir Characterization, Development and Operations, Production, Structural Traps, Oil Sands, Oil Shale, Shale Gas, Coalbed Methane, Deep Basin Gas, Diagenetic Traps, Fractured Carbonate Reservoirs, Stratigraphic Traps, Subsalt Traps, Tight Gas Sands, Gas Hydrates, Coal, Uranium (Nuclear), Geothermal, Renewable Energy, Eolian Sandstones, Sheet Sand Deposits, Estuarine Deposits, Fluvial Deltaic Systems, Deep Sea / Deepwater, Lacustrine Deposits, Marine, Regressive Deposits, Transgressive Deposits, Shelf Sand Deposits, Slope, High Stand Deposits, Incised Valley Deposits, Low Stand Deposits, Conventional Sandstones, Deepwater Turbidites, Dolostones, Carbonate Reefs, (Carbonate) Shelf Sand Deposits, Carbonate Platforms, Sebkha, Lacustrine Deposits, Salt, Conventional Drilling, Directional Drilling, Infill Drilling, Coring, Hydraulic Fracturing, Primary Recovery, Secondary Recovery, Water Flooding, Gas Injection, Tertiary Recovery, Chemical Flooding Processes, Thermal Recovery Processes, Miscible Recovery, Microbial Recovery, Drive Mechanisms, Depletion Drive, Water Drive, Ground Water, Hydrology, Reclamation, Remediation, Remote Sensing, Water Resources, Monitoring, Pollution, Natural Resources, Wind Energy, Solar Energy, Hydroelectric Energy, Bioenergy, Hydrogen Energy
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