Fluid Migration and Accumulation within the Mississippian: Why 2% Oil Cut Here, 15% One Mile Away?

09 September, 2014
Who Should Attend
This course is ideal for individuals involved in Shales in the Mid-Continent Region and the Mississippi Limestone Play.
Objectives

Please see course description.

Course Content

Online Webinar - 2:00 p.m., CDT, 1 hour duration.

Water cut is a big factor in gauging the success of horizontal drilling in the Mississippi Lime Play (MLP). The contributing factors are related in part to the spectrum of producing lithofacies and reservoir quality encountered that varies laterally and vertically, sometimes dramatically. As the extent of the play has increased, so have the types of reservoirs including conventional tripolite, spiculite, and dolomite reservoirs that may or may not be affected by Pennsylvanian karst. Conventional reservoirs are typically in transition when sufficient oil column is not present to lead to irreducible water saturation, inherently leading to variable water cuts based on height about free water and types of pores that are present. 

Unconventional reservoir such as tight, dark organic-bearing dolomitic and silty lithofacies of the “Cowley” are often interbedded the spicultic and dolomitic conventional reservoirs. These rocks with sufficient oil prone organic matter and thermal maturity can locally become self- sourced reservoirs and possibly charge adjoining conventional reservoirs. Coupled with a thick thermally mature Woodford or Chattanooga Shale and fracturing, a hydrocarbon sweet spot is likely.

The structural history during and after the Mississippian with the development of the Arkoma and Anadarko basins and surrounding uplifts led to early thermal maturity of the Woodford Shale that goes back as far to the early Pennsylvanian. Evidence notable wrench faulting peaked in Atokan and Morrowan time in the Anadarko Basin extending well into Kansas. This dynamic setting lead to reactivation of basement weaknesses with both compressional strike-slip and transtensional faults that appear to closely tied to hydrocarbon migration fairways in the northern Midcontinent. 

Structure of the E-Symposium 

Each e-symposium consists of one-hour live e-symposium, along with material for one full day of independent study. The live portion will be followed by a full day of independent study (not a live event). The one-hour live e-symposium can be accessed from any computer anywhere in the world using a high-speed internet connection. After the event is over, you will receive via email information about accessing the asynchronous segment (not live) which consists of a recording of the event, your independent study materials, to be accessed and studied at any time. You will be able to email responses to the readings, along with your study question answers for CEU credit (if you sign up for the extended package). 

Course materials will be available for download after the course closes.

$75
Expires on
01 January, 9999
Member Tuition without CEU
$95
Expires on
01 January, 9999
Nonmember Tuition without CEU
$25
Expires on
01 January, 9999
Student Tuition without CEU
$100
Expires on
01 January, 9999
Member Tuition with CEU
$145
Expires on
01 January, 9999
Nonmember Tuition with CEU
$35
Expires on
01 January, 9999
Student Tuition with CEU
200 people
Limit
1.0
CEU

Limited to 15 student slots.  No refunds for cancellations after August 12, 2014.

 

Lynn Lynn Watney Kansas Geological Survey at the University of Kansas, USA
Vicky Vicky Kroh Registrar, Education Department +1 918 560 2650 +1 918 560 2678
Debbi Debbi Boonstra Education Manager +1 918 560-2630
Susan Susan Nash, Ph.D. Director of Education and Professional Development +1 918 560 2604

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