Robert H. (Bob) Goldstein

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Robert H. (Bob) Goldstein

Robert H. (Bob) Goldstein is the Haas Distinguished Professor in the Department of Geology at the University of Kansas. He has been on the faculty of the Department of Geology at Kansas since 1985. He received the BS in 1979 from Juniata College and received the MS in 1981 and Ph.D. in 1986, both from the University of Wisconsin. 

Bob’s research specialties include sequence stratigraphy of carbonates, diagenesis, and fluid-inclusion research. Current research focuses on the following: 

  1. sea-level, paleotopographic, oceanographic, and climate controls on depositional sequence architecture of the Spanish Miocene; 
  2. modeling reservoir-analog architecture in deep-water and shallow water carbonates; 
  3. predicting porosity in reservoirs from new conceptual models of carbonate diagenesis; 
  4. effect of hydrothermal fluids on carbonate and sandstone reservoir rocks; 
  5. origin and distribution of early and late dolomite; and 
  6. new fluid inclusion techniques for evaluating history of fluid composition. 

Currently, he and his students are working on a variety of projects dealing with upstream fossil fuel energy supply including both conventional and unconventional oil and gas resources.

Robert H. (Bob) Goldstein is the Haas Distinguished Professor in the Department of Geology at the University of Kansas. He has been on the faculty of the Department of Geology at Kansas since 1985. He received the BS in 1979 from Juniata College and received the MS in 1981 and Ph.D. in 1986, both from the University of Wisconsin. 

Bob’s research specialties include sequence stratigraphy of carbonates, diagenesis, and fluid-inclusion research. Current research focuses on the following: 

  1. sea-level, paleotopographic, oceanographic, and climate controls on depositional sequence architecture of the Spanish Miocene; 
  2. modeling reservoir-analog architecture in deep-water and shallow water carbonates; 
  3. predicting porosity in reservoirs from new conceptual models of carbonate diagenesis; 
  4. effect of hydrothermal fluids on carbonate and sandstone reservoir rocks; 
  5. origin and distribution of early and late dolomite; and 
  6. new fluid inclusion techniques for evaluating history of fluid composition. 

Currently, he and his students are working on a variety of projects dealing with upstream fossil fuel energy supply including both conventional and unconventional oil and gas resources.


University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas, USA

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