Delegates Primed to Tackle Division Proposal

The upcoming AAPG Annual Convention and Exhibition in Pittsburgh will be a busy and important time for the House of Delegates, which will hold its annual meeting Sunday, May 19.

We’ll have several proposals for delegates to vote on, and I will ask delegates to exercise their judgment on a wide range of issues affecting AAPG now and in the future.

The most prominent proposal will be to form a new AAPG technical division called the “Petroleum Structure and Geomechanics Division” (PSGD) (see this month’s President’s Column, page 3).

Details of each of the proposals are available in the April Delegate’s Voice, including discussions by AAPG leaders, and I encourage all delegates to come to arrive well prepared and ready to make these historic votes.

The business includes:

First, delegates will vote on a Bylaws amendment allowing for flexibility to use an email option in notifying each member, including students and associates of delinquent annual dues. This housekeeping change will help Tulsa staff be more efficient and cost-effective in accomplishing membership notifications.

The full language of the amended wording is available for review at aapg.org/bylawschanges.cfm.

Second, delegates will consider a proposal to change the boundary between AAPG’s Asia Pacific and European Regions, which would result in five central Asians countries – Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan and Uzbekistan – moving to the European Region from the Asia Pacific Region.

The proposal was made because these countries have a better alignment of geologic interests and professional activity with the European community. In recent years giant oil fields have developed in this area and the geologic community is becoming increasingly active. Leadership in both Asia Pacific and Europe agree with the change.

Third, the proposal for a new technical division comes from the Executive Committee, with its full support.

Background: The Petroleum Structure and Geomechanics Division began as a group of people who have been meeting informally at AAPG annual meetings since 1997, under the leadership of AAPG members Peter Hennings and current elected editor Stephen Laubach.

The group has grown to over 200 geologists who are interested in aspects of structural geology, including faulting, fracturing and seals, which are influenced by rock mechanical properties. This also incorporates the study of stresses and pressures at reservoir level that affect drilling and completion procedures.

Geomechanics has broad appeal and will interest current members as well as draw new members to AAPG from other professional disciplines with overlapping interest.

Fourth, approval of Affiliated Society status has been requested by the Ghana Institution of Geoscientists (GhiG) and the Myanmar Geosciences Society, to be presented by Ed Rothman, chair of the Resolutions Committee. This is routine HoD business – and it shows the continuing growth of AAPG as a global geoscience community.

Finally, delegates will vote on new officers for the HoD who will begin service immediately following the HoD adjournment. The candidates are:

HoD Chair-Elect
  • Paul Britt, independent geologist and president, Texplore, Houston.
  • David Dolph, team lead-Global Exploration, Nexen Petroleum International, Calgary, Canada.
HoD Secretary/Editor
  • Mark Rainer, senior geologist, Jones Energy, San Diego.
  • Dan Billman, president, Billman Geologic Consultants, Mars, Pa.

I encourage delegates to come prepared to vote on these proposals that will guide AAPG’s future.

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