Wanted: Posters to Add to GTW Program in Canada

Contributors: Ross Clark, Michael Abrams, Joe Curiale

Concepts and technologies developed for liquid-rich unconventional plays in North America are on the verge of being exported worldwide. An “A list” of geoscientists from Canada, Europe and the United States are joining forces with AAPG Canada Region to offer GTW Canada, Nov. 3-5 in Vancouver, B.C.

Liquid-rich unconventional petroleum systems, defined as “fine-grained rock acting as both hydrocarbon source and reservoir, or a low permeability reservoir with inter-bedded or juxtaposed organic-rich shale with liquid hydrocarbon potential,” have become significant worldwide exploration targets.

Understanding the hydrocarbon charge system (source, maturity, hydrocarbon phase, burial history and retention) and production capabilities (rock properties, flow rates and resource potential) are critical for a liquid-rich unconventional play to be technically and economically successful.

Today, when it is particularly critical to address and improve our current understanding of these key plays, AAPG’s novel GTW format of interdisciplinary presentation and discussion offers an environment to discuss, debate and share knowledge.

GTW Canada will offer 16 invited presentations divided across four oral sessions. Each oral session will be followed by discussion, with a focus on “where we are headed.”

GTW Canada organizers are actively soliciting poster abstracts for the event. Poster sessions will be on display throughout the workshop, and poster presenters will be given time on the program to introduce their poster to the entire GTW audience. Poster sessions will highlight several additional aspects of the workshop theme, including commercial technologies available across the disciplines.

The four principal workshop sessions will begin with presentations on the development of liquid-rich unconventional reservoirs, with a focus on qualifying key reservoir engineering elements of an unconventional oil play.

Presentations will include specific data needed to rank prospects in terms of importance, early development assessment of an unconventional play and evaluating reservoir fluid properties required for low permeability oil reservoir analysis.

A session on liquid-rich source units follows, with a focus on specific organic and inorganic characteristics of liquid-rich plays, plus source rock case studies and geochemical characteristics.

The third session, on analytical and upcoming technologies, presents current and future analytical methods used to assist the evaluation of liquid-rich unconventional plays.

Presentations will include an overview of current approaches, discussions of microstructure and the ongoing concerns over porosity development, and applications of organic petrography.

The final session will focus on worldwide case studies of successful liquid-rich plays, and will include presentations focusing on specific active oil rich plays, including the Eagle Ford, Niobrara, Utica and Duvernay.

Canada’s Hot Activity

Excitement and global attention continues to build around the economic potential of Canada’s liquid-rich unconventional resource plays. To date more than $2.5 billion has been spent on land in and around the two play areas – one northern play area near Kaybob, the other just south of Pembina.

Among the 17 different operators that have licensed horizontal wells, Shell is most active with 17 wells, and ExxonMobil is next with 15 wells. Shell’s activity appears mostly in the northern play area, but has two wells in the southern play area; ExxonMobil is only in the northern play after buying Celtic Exploration.

One of the hottest liquid-rich unconventional shale plays, the Duvernay, has seen more than 100 horizontal wells licensed since the play’s inception approximately 30 months ago. As of this writing, there are more than 40 wells currently on production from the Duvernay.

Although production data is publicly available, interpreting the early production history of the wells is difficult for numerous reasons. Provincially reported liquid yields for C3+ vary from 40 bbls/mmcf to over 110 bbls/mmcf with operators reporting yields of up to 400 bbls/mmcf.

Production from a few wells, however, stands out. One, the Trilogy HZ Kaybob 3-13-60-20 (W5), is producing in excess of 800 mmcf and 70,000 barrels of liquids in about a year. Another is a recent Encana well announced April 24, 2013 with IP30 rates of 4 mmcf and 1,400 bbls per day.

With these results, the play has become one of the most exciting high-liquids-yield shale gas plays in North America.

Data interpretation is one of many challenges that GTW Canada conveners, presenters and participants alike will attempt to crack during the 2 1/2-day workshop. Registration, hotel room reservations and full program details are available at www.aapg.org/gtw/2013/vancouver.

Comments (0)

 

Regions and Sections

Regions and Sections Column - Carol McGowen
Carol Cain McGowen is the development manager for AAPG's Regions and Sections. She may be contacted via email , or telephone at 1-918-560-9403.

Regions and Sections Column

Regions and Sections is a regular column in the EXPLORER offering news for and about AAPG's six international Regions and six U.S. Sections. News items, press releases and other information should be submitted via email or to: EXPLORER - Regions and Sections, P.O. Box 979, Tulsa, OK 74101. 

View column archives

Meet the Authors 

This month’s column is written by the GTW Canada conveners, Ross Clark (Kallisto Energy), Michael Abrams (Apache) and Joe Curiale (Chevron).

See Also: Book

Desktop /Portals/0/images/_site/AAPG-newlogo-vertical-morepadding.jpg?width=50&h=50&mode=crop&anchor=middlecenter&quality=90amp;encoder=freeimage&progressive=true 4456 Book

This special issue honors the legacy of J. Fred Read, a pioneer in carbonate sedimentology and stratigraphy. He taught at Virginia Tech for 38 years and, along with his students, published more than 120 papers. Many of these students have become leaders in carbonate research.

Desktop /Portals/0/images/_site/AAPG-newlogo-vertical-morepadding.jpg?width=50&h=50&mode=crop&anchor=middlecenter&quality=90amp;encoder=freeimage&progressive=true 12465 Book
Desktop /Portals/0/images/_site/AAPG-newlogo-vertical-morepadding.jpg?width=50&h=50&mode=crop&anchor=middlecenter&quality=90amp;encoder=freeimage&progressive=true 8373 Book

See Also: Bulletin Article

Emission of carbon dioxide (CO2) from fossil-fueled power generation stations contributes to global climate change. Capture of CO2 from such stationary sources and storage within the pores of geologic strata (geologic carbon storage) is one approach to mitigating anthropogenic climate change. The large storage volume needed for this approach to be effective requires injection into pore space saturated with saline water in reservoir strata overlain by cap rocks. One of the main concerns regarding storage in such rocks is leakage via faults. Such leakage requires, first, that the CO2 plume encounter a fault and, second, that the properties of the fault allow CO2 to flow upward. Considering only the first step of encounter, fault population statistics suggest an approach to calculate the probability of a plume encountering a fault, particularly in the early site-selection stage when site-specific characterization data may be lacking. The resulting fault encounter probability approach is applied to a case study in the southern part of the San Joaquin Basin, California. The CO2 plume from a previously planned injection was calculated to have a 4.1% chance of encountering a fully seal offsetting fault and a 9% chance of encountering a fault with a throw half the seal thickness. Subsequently available information indicated the presence of a half-seal offsetting fault at a location 2.8 km (1.7 mi) northeast of the injection site. The encounter probability for a plume large enough to encounter a fault with this throw at this distance from the injection site is 25%, providing a single before and after test of the encounter probability estimation method.
Desktop /Portals/0/PackFlashItemImages/WebReady/measuring-and-modeling-fault-density.jpg?width=50&h=50&mode=crop&anchor=middlecenter&quality=90amp;encoder=freeimage&progressive=true 3714 Bulletin Article

See Also: Online e Symposium

The e-symposium contains several case studies and log examples of bypassed pay and unconventional resources including Niobrara, Bakken, Marcellus, offshore GOM and others examples including processed log quality issues.

Desktop /Portals/0/PackFlashItemImages/WebReady/oc-es-recognizing-unconventional-pay-from-wireline-logs.jpg?width=50&h=50&mode=crop&anchor=middlecenter&quality=90amp;encoder=freeimage&progressive=true 1479 Online e-Symposium