Middle East Region Sets GTW Lineup

Contributors: Abeer Al-Zubaidi

In an effort to continue serving the geosciences community in the Middle East, AAPG Middle East Region will be offering a number of Geosciences Technology Workshops (GTWs) where the attendees, practitioners and scientists will have an opportunity to discuss real cases, issues and experiences.

The AAPG Geosciences Technology Workshops, offering the latest in cuttingedge technology in an interactive environment, follow two tracks for discussion: research and application.

The GTW Middle East schedule for the next several months includes:

  • “Hydrocarbon Trapping Mechanisms in the Middle East,” Dec. 10-12, Istanbul, Turkey
  • “Fracture Monitoring Using Passive Seismic,” Jan. 28-30, Dubai, UAE.
  • Rock Physics, Feb. 4-6, Kuwait City, Kuwait.
  • Geosteering and Well Placement in Thin Reservoirs, Feb. 25-27, Sharm El Sheikh, Egypt.
  • E&P Data Management, March 11-13, Dubai, UAE.
  • Seismic Reservoir Characterization, March 25-27, Abu Dhabi, UAE.
  • Geosciences Workforce: Attraction and Retention, April 8-10, Sharm El Sheikh, Egypt
  • Exploring and Producing Fractured Reservoirs, April 22-24, Dead Sea, Jordan.
  • Exploration of Subsalt Structures in Rift Basins, May 6-8, Amman, Jordan.
  • Looking Ahead of the Drilling Bit, June 3-5, Beirut, Lebanon.
  • Young Professionals Workshop: Mentoring to Bridge the Gap, June 17-19, TBD.

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Regions and Sections

Regions and Sections Column - Carol McGowen
Carol Cain McGowen is the development manager for AAPG's Regions and Sections. She may be contacted via email , or telephone at 1-918-560-9403.

Regions and Sections Column - Abeer Al Zubaidi

Abeer Al Zubaidi is the Director of the AAPG Middle East office. 

Ciaran Larkin is a conference producer for AAPG’s London office.

Regions and Sections Column

Regions and Sections is a regular column in the EXPLORER offering news for and about AAPG's six international Regions and six U.S. Sections. News items, press releases and other information should be submitted via email or to: EXPLORER - Regions and Sections, P.O. Box 979, Tulsa, OK 74101. 

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