Rocky Mountain, Eastern Section Meetings Set This Month

September will be a busy month for the AAPG Sections – two groups will be holding their annual meetings, both in locales that boast geologic industry history and plenty of entertainment opportunities.

Rocky Mountain Section Annual Meeting

Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper, a former oilman and current member of AAPG, will be the All-Convention luncheon speaker at this year’s Rocky Mountain Section meeting, set Sept. 9-12 at the Two Rivers Convention Center in Grand Junction, Colo.

It is the first time Grand Junction has hosted the annual RMS event.

The meeting theme is “Vintage Geology – Perfectly Aged,” and the technical sessions will include updates on the most recent work on resource plays across the region, the sedimentary and structural architecture of the latest plays in the Rockies and the impact and future of energy minerals.

Some of the specific session topics are:

  • New Ideas in Piceance Creek and Uinta Basins.
  • Resource Plays – Exploration and Exploitation.
  • Tight Oil and Gas Reservoirs – Where, How and Why?
  • Colorado Plateau Geology and Paleontology: A Tribute to

Robert G. Young.

The All-Convention luncheon will begin at 11:45 a.m. on Monday, Sept. 10.

Eastern Section Annual Meeting

The Eastern Section’s 41st annual meeting returns to Cleveland, the site of the Section’s very first meeting, Cleveland, for a gathering built on the theme “Classic Rocks – 153 Years of Performance.”

The meeting will be held Sept. 22-26, and the technical program offers short courses, field trips and a technical program that centers on the Section’s four major basins.

Technical sessions will include:

  • Case Histories and Development of the Marcellus Shale Reservoirs.
  • Horizontal Wells: Design, Drilling, Completion and Fracturing Techniques.
  • Regional Geologic Concepts and new Plays in the Appalachian and Illinois Basin.
  • Trenton-Black River Exploration and Production in Michigan and Indiana.
  • Exploration and Production of Shale Source/Reservoir Rocks.

Entertainment at the meeting includes a night at the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame, with full access to the museum.

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Regions and Sections

Regions and Sections Column - Carol McGowen
Carol Cain McGowen is the development manager for AAPG's Regions and Sections. She may be contacted via email , or telephone at 1-918-560-9403.

Regions and Sections Column

Regions and Sections is a regular column in the EXPLORER offering news for and about AAPG's six international Regions and six U.S. Sections. News items, press releases and other information should be submitted via email or to: EXPLORER - Regions and Sections, P.O. Box 979, Tulsa, OK 74101. 

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This article describes a 250-m (820-ft)-thick upper Eocene deep-water clastic succession. This succession is divided into two reservoir zones: the lower sandstone zone (LSZ) and the upper sandstone zone, separated by a package of pelitic rocks with variable thickness on the order of tens of meters. The application of sequence-stratigraphic methodology allowed the subdivision of this stratigraphic section into third-order systems tracts.

The LSZ is characterized by blocky and fining-upward beds on well logs, and includes interbedded shale layers of as much as 10 m (33 ft) thick. This zone reaches a maximum thickness of 150 m (492 ft) and fills a trough at least 4 km (2 mi) wide, underlain by an erosional surface. The lower part of this zone consists of coarse- to medium-grained sandstones with good vertical pressure communication. We interpret this unit as vertically and laterally amalgamated channel-fill deposits of high-density turbidity flows accumulated during late forced regression. The sandstones in the upper part of this trough are dominantly medium to fine grained and display an overall fining-upward trend. We interpret them as laterally amalgamated channel-fill deposits of lower density turbidity flows, relative to the ones in the lower part of the LSZ, accumulated during lowstand to early transgression.

The pelitic rocks that separate the two sandstone zones display variable thickness, from 35 to more than 100 m (115–>328 ft), indistinct seismic facies, and no internal markers on well logs, and consist of muddy diamictites with contorted shale rip-up clasts. This section is interpreted as cohesive debris flows and/or mass-transported slumps accumulated during late transgression.

The upper sandstone zone displays a weakly defined blocky well-log signature, where the proportion of sand is higher than 80%, and a jagged well-log signature, where the sand proportion is lower than 60%. The high proportions of sand are associated with a channelized geometry that is well delineated on seismic amplitude maps. Several depositional elements are identified within this zone, including leveed channels, crevasse channels, and splays associated with turbidity flows. This package is interpreted as the product of increased terrigenous sediment supply during highstand normal regression.

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